Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re:My recent trip to the optometrist

Expand Messages
  • rosanna_armendariz
    Thanks for sharing, Sundee. I hope all is well with your eyes! And it is indeed unfortunate that a so-called medical professional wouldn t consider the
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 6, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks for sharing, Sundee. I hope all is well with your eyes! And it is indeed unfortunate that a so-called medical professional wouldn't consider the possibility that you might have African-American ancestry. It is no wonder that people are so often misdiagnosed or told nothing is wrong with them and sent home, only to get worse, or in some very unfortunate cases, die from lack of treatment. Ugh! Hopefully those human vision glasses will be available soon.



      In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
      Sundee Frazier <sundeefrazier@...> wrote:



      I also like the idea of human vision glasses, Rosanna! I had an interesting experience at the optometrist recently, as well, where race played into the discussion and a possible diagnosis of glaucoma.

      I didn't know this before, but it turns out African-Americans have a higher rate of glaucoma because of the shape of the socket that holds the optic nerve (glaucoma is a problem where a lack of drainage of fluids creates pressure in the eye disrupting the function of the optic nerve). Anyway, I had taken a test that showed a likely glaucoma diagnosis, but the optometrist was clearly confused why I (who am on the younger side--for glaucoma--and don't look obviously black) would have this problem. As she listed the risk factors, I was able to clear up for her that I am in fact African-American on one side of my family.

      To see my blackness you have to look deep inside me (or my eyes), literally!

      Sundee Frazier
      www.sundeefrazier.com

      Brendan Buckley's Universe and Everything in It (Delacorte/Random House 2007)
      Winner, Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Award (American Librarian Association)
      The Other Half of My Heart (coming June 2010)
      http://www.hungermtn.org/the-other-half-of-my-heart/
    • wintyreeve@aol.com
      That is fascinating! I joined a medical research study....I have to do breathing tests, which measure how much air your lungs push out and how much oxygen is
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 11, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        That is fascinating!
         
        I joined a medical research study....I have to do breathing tests, which measure how much air your lungs push out and how much oxygen is in the blood. I told the doctor I am Mixed but she put my race as "White". LOL* I obviously don't look White!  Anyways, the doctor told me an average Black person has a 12% decreased numbers in the spirometer tests (the volume of air inhaled and exhaled from the lungs). And this is their average. Since I am part White, the doctor decided to err on the side of caution.
         
        Lynn

        In a message dated 11/6/2009 12:23:14 A.M. Central Standard Time, sundeefrazier@... writes:
         

        I also like the idea of human vision glasses, Rosanna! I had an interesting experience at the optometrist recently, as well, where race played into the discussion and a possible diagnosis of glaucoma.


        I didn't know this before, but it turns out African-Americans
        have a higher rate of glaucoma because of the shape of the socket that holds the optic nerve (glaucoma is a problem where a lack of drainage of fluids creates pressure in the eye disrupting the function of the optic nerve). Anyway, I had taken a test that showed a likely glaucoma diagnosis, but the optometrist was clearly confused why I (who am on the younger side--for glaucoma--and don't look obviously black) would have this problem. As she listed the risk factors, I was able to clear up for her that I am in fact African-American
        on one side of my family.

        To see my blackness you have to look deep inside me (or my eyes), literally!

        Sundee Frazier

        Brendan Buckley's Universe and Everything in It (Delacorte/Random House 2007)
        Winner, Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Award (American Librarian Association)
        The Other Half of My Heart (coming June 2010)







      • rosanna_armendariz
        Wow. Before now I really hadn t thought about how being mixed might lead to medical misdiagnosis and other doctor-patient miscommunications and problems
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 11, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Wow. Before now I really hadn't thought about how being mixed might lead to medical misdiagnosis and other doctor-patient miscommunications and problems obtaining medical care. It really is discouraging to think about.



          In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com, wintyreeve@... wrote:



          That is fascinating!

          I joined a medical research study....I have to do breathing tests, which measure how much air your lungs push out and how much oxygen is in the blood.
          I told the doctor I am Mixed but she put my race as "White". LOL* I obviously don't look White! Anyways, the doctor told me an average Black person has a 12% decreased numbers in the spirometer tests (the volume of air inhaled and exhaled from the lungs). And this is their average. Since I am part White, the doctor decided to err on the side of caution.

          Lynn


          sundeefrazier@... writes:

          I also like the idea of human vision glasses, Rosanna! I had an interesting experience at the optometrist recently, as well, where race played into the discussion and a possible diagnosis of glaucoma.

          I didn't know this before, but it turns out _African-Americans _
          (http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=Al5eeK2CFwcv4rD5U5qzvEfty6IX?qid=20070527201834AAIhzhM&show=7#profile-info-CiC2JY9Maa)
          have a higher rate of glaucoma because of the shape of the socket that holds the optic nerve (glaucoma is a problem where a lack of drainage of fluids creates pressure in the eye disrupting the function of the optic nerve).
          Anyway, I had taken a test that showed a likely glaucoma diagnosis, but the optometrist was clearly confused why I (who am on the younger side--for glaucoma--and don't look obviously black) would have this problem. As she listed the risk factors, I was able to clear up for her that I am in fact African-American
          (http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=Al5eeK2CFwcv4rD5U5qzvEfty6IX?qid=20070527201834AAIhzhM&show=7#profile-info-CiC2JY9Maa)
          on one side of my family.

          To see my blackness you have to look deep inside me (or my eyes), literally!

          Sundee Frazier
          www.sundeefrazier.www_ (http://www.sundeefrazier.com/)


          Brendan Buckley's Universe and Everything in It (Delacorte/Random House 2007) Winner, Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Award (American Librarian Association)
          The Other Half of My Heart (coming June 2010)
          http://www.hungermthttp://wwwhttp://www.http://www.h_
          http://www.hungermtn.org/the-other-half-of-my-heart/)
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.