Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

study

Expand Messages
  • Heather Stimmel
    I read Mr. Taylor s post, regarding the study. I just have one question. What does he mean when he says perceived discrimination? I mean... isn t it pretty
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 13, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      I read Mr. Taylor's post, regarding the study. I just have one question. What does he mean when he says "perceived" discrimination? I mean... isn't it pretty clear (to multiracial individuals) when someone is discrimating against you? It is to me, and the multiracial friends and family I know. Just wondering...

      "Our lives begin to end the day we
      become silent about things that matter."
      -Martin Luther King, Jr.

    • multiethnic77
      Hi Heather, Thank you for your question. As a fellow multiethnic American, I certainly agree that ethnic discrimination can definitely be blatant and can also
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 13, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Heather,

        Thank you for your question. As a fellow multiethnic American, I certainly agree that ethnic discrimination can definitely be blatant and can also be easily recognized. Researchers, such as myself, however, must be as objective as possible when measuring it. This can be a very difficult task as ethnic discrimination can be ambiguous at times. Those investigating it that use current scientific assessment measures, like the one in my questionnaire, are, for the most part, unable to know if every person's thought of being ethnically discriminated against actually was intended to be ethnically discriminatory by the alleged discriminator/s. That is why researchers who use scientific assessments to gauge ethnic discrimination can not factually say such and such person was ethnically discriminated against. What researchers can do reasonably objectively is measure the perception of ethnic discrimination. Racism, a similar concept, is also measured in the same way--using perceived racism instruments. I hope this was helpful.

        James



        In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
        Heather Stimmel <heather21230@...> wrote:



        I read Mr. Taylor's post, regarding the study. I just have one question. What does he mean when he says "perceived" discrimination? I mean... isn't it pretty clear (to multiracial individuals) when someone is discrimating against you? It is to me, and the multiracial friends and family I know. Just wondering...


        "Our lives begin to end the day we
        become silent about things that matter."
        -Martin Luther King, Jr.
      • Rosanna
        Yes, in the social sciences researchers must attempt to be as objective as possible. I have a BA in sociology and also did grad work in the field (before
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 20, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Yes, in the social sciences researchers must attempt to be as objective as possible. I have a BA in sociology and also did grad work in the field (before switching to creative writing!), so I understand what you're saying. I'm just glad to see more grad students and other researchers paying attention to multiethnic americans. Please let us know the results of your study or if it's published somewhere. Thanks and good luck.



          In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
          "multiethnic77" <multiethnic77@...> wrote:



          Hi Heather,

          Thank you for your question. As a fellow multiethnic American, I certainly agree that ethnic discrimination can definitely be blatant and can also be easily recognized. Researchers, such as myself, however, must be as objective as possible when measuring it. This can be a very difficult task as ethnic discrimination can be ambiguous at times. Those investigating it that use current scientific assessment measures, like the one in my questionnaire, are, for the most part, unable to know if every person's thought of being ethnically discriminated against actually was intended to be ethnically discriminatory by the alleged discriminator/s. That is why researchers who use scientific assessments to gauge ethnic discrimination can not factually say such and such person was ethnically discriminated against. What researchers can do reasonably objectively is measure the perception of ethnic discrimination. Racism, a similar concept, is also measured in the same way--using perceived racism instruments. I hope this was helpful.

          James


          In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
          Heather Stimmel <heather21230@> wrote:


          I read Mr. Taylor's post, regarding the study. I just have one question. What does he mean when he says "perceived" discrimination? I mean... isn't it pretty clear (to multiracial individuals) when someone is discrimating against you? It is to me, and the multiracial friends and family I know. Just wondering...

          "Our lives begin to end the day we
          become silent about things that matter."
          -Martin Luther King, Jr.
        • wintyreeve@aol.com
          That is so funny... My major is sociology and minor is creative writing! Grin* Talk about small world,,, I think sociology is pretty flexible for a science.
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 20, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            That is so funny... My major is sociology and minor is creative writing! Grin* Talk about small world,,,
             
            I think sociology is pretty flexible for a science. What do you think?
             
            Lynn
             
             
             
            In a message dated 7/20/2009 3:23:23 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, rosanna_armendariz@... writes:
             

            Yes, in the social sciences researchers must attempt to be as objective as possible. I have a BA in sociology and also did grad work in the field (before switching to creative writing!), so I understand what you're saying. I'm just glad to see more grad students and other researchers paying attention to multiethnic americans. Please let us know the results of your study or if it's published somewhere. Thanks and good luck.

            In Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com,
            "multiethnic77" <multiethnic77@ ...> wrote:

            Hi Heather,

            Thank you for your question. As a fellow multiethnic American, I certainly agree that ethnic discrimination can definitely be blatant and can also be easily recognized. Researchers, such as myself, however, must be as objective as possible when measuring it. This can be a very difficult task as ethnic discrimination can be ambiguous at times. Those investigating it that use current scientific assessment measures, like the one in my questionnaire, are, for the most part, unable to know if every person's thought of being ethnically discriminated against actually was intended to be ethnically discriminatory by the alleged discriminator/ s. That is why researchers who use scientific assessments to gauge ethnic discrimination can not factually say such and such person was ethnically discriminated against. What researchers can do reasonably objectively is measure the perception of ethnic discrimination. Racism, a similar concept, is also measured in the same way--using perceived racism instruments. I hope this was helpful.

            James

            In Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com,
            Heather Stimmel <heather21230@ > wrote:

            I read Mr. Taylor's post, regarding the study. I just have one question. What does he mean when he says "perceived" discrimination? I mean... isn't it pretty clear (to multiracial individuals) when someone is discrimating against you? It is to me, and the multiracial friends and family I know. Just wondering...

            "Our lives begin to end the day we
            become silent about things that matter."
            -Martin Luther King, Jr.

          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.