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Re: [Generation-Mixed] Black History Month & Kids

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  • soul sis36
    Hi Lynn, Thanks for the info!!! Interesting about your kids. Your kids are smart and love to learn about anything, etc. I am so glad to hear it. =)
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 29, 2008
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      Hi Lynn,

      Thanks for the info!!! Interesting about your kids. Your kids are smart and love to learn about anything, etc. I am so glad to hear it. =)

      wintyreeve@... wrote:
      Hi Soul,
       
      My daughter is now 4 and my son is 7. I teach my children at home. Both kids learn differently, and yes I need to adjust to their learning style and remain age appropriate. My daughter learns by asking lots of questions and is more "hands on". My son can learn by memory, he just takes everything in and likes to try out new ideas & experiments. My son loves to learn about DNA, science and dinosaurs. I actually read "Scientific American" and "National Geographic" to him. Kids can learn just about anything, and they love the attention and closeness when you spend time with them. I have learned so much being able to teach my children. Hehe and Had so many laughs trying to find new activities.
      THAT BEING SAID... I have found that kids are very teachable and you don't have to "dummy down" what you teach them. Their minds are so open to new information. Kids are naturally curious and love to explore. It is so important that we, adults, realize we are also teachers and mentors.
      There are tons of web sites and library materials or community events that will help you. I also feel it is important that children spend time with their elders, and learn to listen. Each one of us here has a special gift or talent, so let's share it!!
       
      Love, Lynn
       
      PS: There is a story on my family page that my daughter and I wrote together: My son also took a photograph that is on this page if you scroll down. Enjoy!
       





    • Rosanna
      I hear you, Lynn. The public school system is in a deplorable state. Students spend at least half the year practiciing for standardized tests, so there isn t
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 4, 2008
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        I hear you, Lynn.
        The public school system is in a deplorable state.
        Students spend at least half the year practiciing
        for standardized tests, so there isn't much
        time left over to really learn anything.
        That's why I plan to home school.


        In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com, wintyreeve@... wrote:


        Hello Friends,

        I was teaching some kids in Sunday School about Black History
        Month, and played the song "Iko, Iko" by the Dixie Cups to tell them
        about the way the song came from African slaves who hid African words
        within the song to talk to each other, and give each other hope.

        The oldest kid was 8, and the youngest is my daughter, who is 4.
        My daughter is taught, by me at home, so she knows about slavery
        --and her own family history. I teach my daughter alot of others
        things too (spelling, science, math, etc.). Anyways, the children
        did not know about slavery and did not even know what a slave is.
        When I tried to tell them about their ancestors coming from Africa,
        big boats--they asked about toys on the ship. They had no idea
        what a slave ship is--or what conditions were like. Not only did I
        play "Iko, Iko" but I served food to let them experience what was
        passed down from our ancestors, and served a mango so they could
        taste a food from South Africa. The kids had no idea that things
        were passed down, one generation to the next, in their family and
        this is where we get so much of who we are. They just assumed food
        is something from a grocery store that your mom makes for you.
        They had no concept or way to imagine what was given to them from
        their ancestors. They thought music was only something played on
        the radio and had no idea that the music came from somewhere,
        and had a meaning that was part of their culture or identity.
        One of the kids told me that he thought Soulja Boy spoke "African".
        What I was told is that "Black History" month means a party at
        school and a talent show. The child who said this came from a
        school that is supposed to emphasize African-American culture,
        and is named after a prominent African-American person.

        I think I have to start from the beginning and teach these kids
        ... But what I want to say is do not assume that the school is
        teaching your children what is important to you, or your family.
        Do not assume the school is teaching what you think a child
        should know. Go to the school, to the teacher, and find out for
        yourself. Make a visit to the classroom. And most important,
        teach your children at home. And remember, you are an example
        for the child--you are a more powerful influence that you know.

        Blessings, Lynn
      • barac1998@aol.com
        It is interesting that the schools seem like they don t have time. However I m firm on getting them to make time, in a nice way of course. I m a oral
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 4, 2008
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          It is interesting that the schools seem like they don't have time. However I'm firm on getting them to make time, in a nice way of course. I'm a oral tradition storyteller, for a living. I'm trying to get schools to see not only why there should be something for Black History month in their school, but also that the history is not confined to just February. 365 days of Blackness if you will. I also do performances that are  made for the the curriculum that they are using. Or they can pick a program I have. I say that to say it takes a lot of time on my part. I meet with schools for other things and work the community. So when these things come up, we can get in a little better. I don't do it  for that , it just works out that way. I try to get the BSU and whoever to have some pride and put something. Handle it with care not just throw it together. Besides doing my storytelling, I help plan many of the events or give some input.
           
          Even on the adult level we are forgettiing how to even celebrate Black History Month in some areas. Not having the right history or what is the meaning. I'm one of many that does this. Keep in mind there are still Keepers of the Culture, pressing on.
           
          Suggest to the schools what you want, go to the PTA meetings. Many don't know how to do our history. One school in my area had three programs in one day, the draw back was it was made optional for the students. This is the school that because of their attitude transformed me into a storyteller.
           
          It is my understanding that this middle school did like a news broadcast panel of historical figures like Harriet Tubman for example. Hopefully we will be part of the history one day.



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