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Other People's Skin (by Elizabeth Atkins)

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  • multiracialbookclub
    Dear AP, Here s info about my new book. It contains 4 stories; my novella is about a biracial college student. Thank you for the invitation to send this for
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 2, 2007
      Dear AP, 

      Here's info about my new book. 

      It contains 4 stories; my novella is
      about a biracial college student. 

      Thank you for the invitation to send
      this for posting on
      Generation-Mixed

      I am immensely appreciative of the group's
      interest and enthusiasm in my message!

      –-
      Elizabeth

       
       
      [[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[



      It's about an obsession as American
      as apple pie: `Other People's Skin'


      Sadly, this bitter obsession about color
      has been dividing and conquering
      black women for generations.

      Now a new book is sprinkling some sweetness
      on this compelling issue – by showcasing
      African-American women who triumph
      over the tragedy that race has wreaked
      on their hearts and minds.
       

      Other People's Skin: Four
      Novellas
       is a literary elixir that
      can heal and unite women of color. 

      And men who read these powerful stories
      will glean a newfound respect and awe for
      black women's strength and resilience.


      OTHER PEOPLE'S SKIN 
                   "FICTION WITH A MISSION"




      Here's a peek at the anthology 
      from Atria /Simon & Schuster
      that contains my novella:
      http://www.empowerourselves.org/home.html 

      And here's an excerpt …
      http://www.empowerourselves.org 

      The co-authors are Tracy Price-Thompson, TaRessa
      Stovall
      and Desiree Cooper (co-host of American
      Weekend on NPR and Detroit Free Press columnist). 



      Tracy Price-Thompson               TaRessa Stovall


      Desiree Cooper                                Elizabeth Atkins

      We are planning a national tour next

      summer along with poignant panel
      discussions about this important issue.

      Thank you again,
      Elizabeth.
       
      ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]] 
    • wintyreeve@aol.com
      Hello Friends, On Other s People s Skin and comparing your hair, skin and outward features to other people ... I want to share something I have learned when
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 5, 2007
        Hello Friends,
         
        On "Other's People's Skin" and comparing your
        hair, skin and outward features to other people
        ... I want to share something I have learned
        when researching my family history.

        I read chapter 1 of "Stolen Childhood: Slave Youth in
        19th Century America" by Wilma King, which is posted
        on the Washington Post website (address below).

        I was so disgusted and disturbed by the vivid, often firsthand
        experiences, of children raised during slavery that I wanted
        to scream ... but the object of my anger has shifted from the
        evils of slavery to the lingering self-degregadation among
        modern slave descendants. So many youth today have lost
        their connection to community, families have been displaced
        and knowledge lost then replaced with media hype. I really
        feel that we need to re-educate our youth, and take a stand
        of leaders to win back the hearts and minds of our children.

        I was so sick at reading "Stolen Childhood"--we are a generation of
        survivors and yet so few acknowledge or give thanks for our very
        lives, and those who suffered and worked for our very existence.
        It took an incredible amount of strength, resourcefulnes
        and prayer for a slave child to live past infancy.

        I really feel that if people could just grasp the incredible odds
        it took to survive slavery that they would have more love and
        appeciation not only for themselves but for their heritage as well.


        Here is some of what I learned:

        * Pregnant women kept as slaves often miscarried their children
        before birth due to horrendous living conditions that include
        lack of proper nutrition, lack of medical care, heavy labor
        throughout pregnancy and abuse inflicted on them.

        * Many children died before the age of nine due to
        horrendous living conditions, as well as lack of
        supervision while the parents were working.

        * Children were valued among slaveholders because they were worth
        money -- mothers were often made to feel guilty, shamed, and
        personally responsible for the deaths of their children.

        * Parenting a child while being held a slave required
        tremendous fortitude, and the bonds between a child
        were often tested when that child was abused or sold.
        Many parents integrated African traditions into
        child rearing to maintain familial connections.

        * "Enslaved parents had an unusually heavy responsibility,
        for they not only had to survive, but they also had to
        ensure that their children survived under conditions that
        were tantamount to perpetual war between slaveholders
        fighting to control their chattel while the bond servants
        were struggling to free themselves from the control of others.
        The African heritage was an important factor
        in how enslaved mothers and fathers guided
        their children through the strife..."

        -- Wilma King


        I can see now that every aspect of my features tells a story,
        tracing back to the beginnings of my heritage.
        To know the sacrifices, battles and efforts won to
        birth our generations gives me a sense of gratitude
        for all I have, and for the traits passed down to me --
        because in surviving slavery, out ancestors have given
        the greatest gift of love, that being our very lives.

        Namaste ~ Lynn
         
        Chapter One to "Stolen Childhood" by Wilma King
         



      • mixd4evr
        Thank you for your insight on this atrocity. I will definitely read Stolen Childhood . This brings up an issue near and dear to my heart think about all of
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 6, 2007
          Thank you for your insight on this atrocity.
          I will definitely read "Stolen Childhood".


          This brings up an issue near and dear to my heart think about
          all of the children sold into slavery in Asia, especially
          Cambodia, Thailand and many other Southeast Asian countries.
          These children are either SOLD by their parents into sexual
          slavery or industrial slavery. I can't even imagine the
          lives these children live or even how they make it through
          their torturous days? It is beyond sad and this is Modern Day
          Slavery something that the world can change but largely ignores.

          Any thoughts?

          Thanks, I did not mean to divert attention from
          your post but I think they are intertwined.



          In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
          Lynn <wintyreeve@...> wrote:



          Hello Friends,

          On "Other's People's Skin" and comparing your
          hair, skin and outward features to other people
          ... I want to share something I have learned
          when researching my family history.

          I read chapter 1 of "Stolen Childhood: Slave Youth in
          19th Century America" by Wilma King, which is posted
          on the Washington Post website (address below).

          I was so disgusted and disturbed by the vivid, often firsthand
          experiences, of children raised during slavery that I wanted
          to scream ... but the object of my anger has shifted from the
          evils of slavery to the lingering self-degregadation among
          modern slave descendants. So many youth today have lost
          their connection to community, families have been displaced
          and knowledge lost then replaced with media hype. I really
          feel that we need to re-educate our youth, and take a stand
          of leaders to win back the hearts and minds of our children.

          I was so sick at reading "Stolen Childhood"--we are a generation of
          survivors and yet so few acknowledge or give thanks for our very
          lives, and those who suffered and worked for our very existence.
          It took an incredible amount of strength, resourcefulnes
          and prayer for a slave child to live past infancy.

          I really feel that if people could just grasp the incredible odds
          it took to survive slavery that they would have more love and
          appeciation not only for themselves but for their heritage as well.


          Here is some of what I learned:

          * Pregnant women kept as slaves often miscarried their children
          before birth due to horrendous living conditions that include
          lack of proper nutrition, lack of medical care, heavy labor
          throughout pregnancy and abuse inflicted on them.

          * Many children died before the age of nine due to
          horrendous living conditions, as well as lack of
          supervision while the parents were working.

          * Children were valued among slaveholders because they were worth
          money -- mothers were often made to feel guilty, shamed, and
          personally responsible for the deaths of their children.

          * Parenting a child while being held a slave required
          tremendous fortitude, and the bonds between a child
          were often tested when that child was abused or sold.
          Many parents integrated African traditions into
          child rearing to maintain familial connections.

          * "Enslaved parents had an unusually heavy responsibility,
          for they not only had to survive, but they also had to
          ensure that their children survived under conditions that
          were tantamount to perpetual war between slaveholders
          fighting to control their chattel while the bond servants
          were struggling to free themselves from the control of others.
          The African heritage was an important factor
          in how enslaved mothers and fathers guided
          their children through the strife..."

          -- Wilma King


          I can see now that every aspect of my features tells a story,
          tracing back to the beginnings of my heritage.
          To know the sacrifices, battles and efforts won to
          birth our generations gives me a sense of gratitude
          for all I have, and for the traits passed down to me --
          because in surviving slavery, out ancestors have given
          the greatest gift of love, that being our very lives.

          Namaste ~ Lynn

          Chapter One to "Stolen Childhood" by Wilma King
          http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/longterm/books/chap1/stolen.htm

          My Thoughts on "Stolen Childhood
          "http://inourhearts.wordpress.com/2007/09/29/stolen-childhood-children-slavery-a-review-on-chapter-1/




          [Related Link: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3418%5d
        • wintyreeve@aol.com
          RE: This brings up an issue near and dear to my heart think about all of the children sold into slavery in Asia, especially Cambodia, Thailand and many other
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 11, 2007
            RE: This brings up an issue near and dear to my heart think about all of the children sold into slavery in Asia, especially Cambodia, Thailand and many other Southeast Asian countries.
             
            There is this Ojibwa man named Peter Razor, and when I saw him speak several years ago--you could tell he had been through some trauma. His eyes looked so haunted--he knew everything that was in the room, took in things that were not even in sight. He was also a fighter, a man who fought to have his story told. Peter survived Minnesota boarding schools, where he was constantly abused and degraded. Then he was farmed out--sold like a slave, and almost killed. His book "While Locust Slept" is very disturbing and sickening, not only what happened to Peter but to the abuse, and even murder he witnessed to other children that happened in America.
            I gave "While Locust Slept" to my friend to read. My friend said no I can't read this, it's too depressing. That made me so angry--"too depressing". How many people look away from abuse, oppression and suffering because of their own personal discomfort? How can you know something is wrong and not act? It made me think of all the wrong in the world that is allowed simply because people look away.
             
            You are right E--child slavery is wrong. Child slavery deserves public outcry, and something must be done. It should not be ignored. Some of these bastards from America that are hurting children are being caught on camera by the media, and I cheer every time one of them is sent to jail or a law is changed. I know I can't change the world but I will do what I can...and pray.
             
            Blessings ~ Lynn
             
             

            Author Peter Razor to Speak

            By Molly Exner
            UW-RF News Bureau

            APRIL 8, 2005--Award-winning author, Peter Razor, will read his stark, haunting prose from his book, "While the Locust Slept," at 4:15 p.m., on April 19 in the Chalmer Davee Library Breezeway at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls.

            Razor, a first-time author at age 72, chronicles his survival of abuse and bigotry as an Ojibwe man at a state orphanage in the 1930s, and the brutal farm indenture that followed.

            Through transcendent prose, Razor recalls his early years as a ward of the state of Minnesota. Disclosing his story through flashbacks and relying on research from his own case files, Razor pieces together the shattered fragments of his boyhood into a memoir that reads as compellingly as a novel.

            Abandoned as an infant at the State Public School in Owatonna, Minn., Razor is raised by abusive workers who thought of him as nothing more than "a dirty Injun." Cut off from his family and his heritage, he turns inward, forced to learn about the world on his own. After failed attempts to run away from the orphanage, he is indentured by the state to an abusive, reclusive farm family. Beaten, poorly fed, clothed in rags, and worked like a slave laborer, he struggles to attend high school and begins to dream of another life.

            Winner of a Minnesota Book Award, Razor's "While the Locust Slept" presents a stark and often chilling story, devoid of self-pity. Razor recalls with haunting clarity the years he, like the locust, patiently waited to awaken and emerge.

            Razor currently is an enrolled member of the Fond du Lac Band of Ojibwa. As an adult, Razor researched his past and culture and began dancing in powwows and learning to make traditional garments. In recent years, he has received acclaim for the instruments he makes, including hand drums, rattles and jingles.

            For more information, contact Kay Montgomery at 715/425-3742.





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