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  • wintyreeve@aol.com
    Hello Keir, Thanks for sharing your story. I can relate to a lot of what you are saying ... and want you to know you have my support. and insight, your voice
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 5, 2007
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      Hello Keir,
       
      I can relate to a lot of what you are saying
      ... and want you to know you have my support.
      Stay strong--and keep on sharing your stories
      and insight, your voice really is important for
      others, especially kids, to hear and learn from.

       
      Blessings ~ Lynn
       
       
      War, disaster survivors offer lessons in tolerance, hope
       
      The Record
      Saturday, May 19, 2007

      By WALTER DAWKINS
      STAFF WRITER


      Holocaust survivors, a refugee from war-torn Sudan
      and a black man who befriends Ku Klux Klan members
      were among about 50 speakers Friday to describe their
      experiences to Fieldstone Middle School students in Montvale.


      "They are speaking really about tolerance, forgiveness and peace,"
      Assistant Principal Mark Maire said of the daylong
      event titled, "Respect, Reflect, and Remember."

      "They are teaching the kids to look at people differently,
      to look at life differently, to appreciate other people and
      be thankful for what they have because you are dealing with
      Holocaust survivors and former Rwandan refugees who lost everything."

      Irene McNally, president of the Montvale Parent-Teacher
      Organization, said live presenters were a much more
      effective way for students to learn valuable life lessons.

      "Character education, which includes topics like bullying,
      being a good citizen and volunteering, is mandated by
      the state," said McNally, who helped organize the event.

      "If you tell kids about these events through
      textbooks, it feels rather sterile.
      But if you can show them a Holocaust survivor or a World War
      II camp liberator in flesh and blood, it makes it more real."

      Kristina Myers of the Alice Paul Institute told
      the students about Paul's struggles in the early
      1900s to help women earn the right to vote.

      "She was arrested, she went on hunger strikes, she
      did all of this because she believed in something
      very strongly," Myers said of the New Jersey activist.

      "So I'm hoping to pass to the kids that if they
      believe in something and they see an injustice,
      that they can change it just like Alice Paul did."

      Daryl Davis, an African-American, spoke about
      his experiences befriending and ultimately
      converting members of the Klan to tolerance.

      "Take the time to talk to people who are different than
      you and you can change the world," said Davis, who wrote a
      book, "Klan-Destine Relationships," about his experiences.

      Atem Ajok talked about the civil war in his
      native Sudan that destroyed his village and has
      resulted in the deaths of at least 2 million people.
      Ajok escaped to the United States after the U.S.
      government granted refugee status to about 3,800
      Sudanese young men displaced or orphaned by the war.

      "Genocidal war anywhere can be stopped
      if we all speak out," said Ajok, 25.

      "As the great Dr. Martin Luther King once said,
      at the end what we will remember is not the words
      of our enemies, but the silence of our friends."

      Holocaust survivor Arlette Michaelis grew up in Brussels,
      Belgium, during the Nazi occupation in World War II.

      Her parents and brother were imprisoned for anti-Nazi
      activities, including hiding Jews in their home.

      "You've got to be informed, listen and know history
      so that it doesn't repeat itself," Michaelis said.

      "And don't give your enemy the weapon of fear.

      You can never lose your hope in a better
      future and in your fight for freedom."

      State Sen. Gerald Cardinale, R-Cresskill,
      who attended, said he was very impressed.

      "It's amazing that they were able to put
      together -- the variety and quality of
      speakers in this program," Cardinale said.

      "When you see people who've lived these
      experiences, it personalizes in a way
      that really brings it home to all of us.

      It becomes something that we feel a
      responsibility to do something about it."

      Many of the fifth- through eighth-grade
      students, who all wore maroon T-shirts with
      "Respect, Reflect, Remember" printed on the back,
      said they appreciated the value of what they heard.

      "I think it's a great opportunity for us to learn
      about people who come from different countries,"
      said fifth-grader Nick Hallowell, 11.

      "I learned that you should never give up in life."

      Eighth-grader Ryan Rosenthal also
      was happy with the knowledge he gained.

      "I learned how to be respectful, how to
      overcome challenges and how to deal with
      problems in your life," said Ryan, 14.

      Eleven-year-old April Hanna said her favorite
      speaker was Davis, who confronted the
      Klan members with understanding.

      "He influenced the KKK to not treat people differently,
      and that we're all equal," the fifth-grader said.

      "I learned a lot of things about life."

      Richard Williams, a survivor of the Oklahoma City bombing
      in 1995 who spoke about how he recovered from the traumatic
      event, said he got as much out of the day as the kids.

      "It's wonderful for me to be able to share my story with these
      children," said Williams, one of the last people pulled from
      the wreckage of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building.

      "It's a story of hope and healing and it's probably
      more cathartic for me than it is for the children."

      E-mail: dawkins@...




    • kier22_2
      Thanks Lynn, That s what makes it worth it. In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com, wintyreeve@... wrote: Hello Keir, I can relate to a lot of what you are saying
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 6, 2007
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        Thanks Lynn, That's what makes it worth it.



        In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
        wintyreeve@... wrote:


        Hello Keir,

        I can relate to a lot of what you are saying
        ... and want you to know you have my support.
        Stay strong--and keep on sharing your stories
        and insight, your voice really is important for
        others, especially kids, to hear and learn from.

        Blessings ~ Lynn


        http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2MDYmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTcxMzY1MjgmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXky



        War, disaster survivors offer lessons in tolerance, hope


        Saturday, May 19, 2007


        By WALTER DAWKINS
        STAFF WRITER



        Holocaust survivors, a refugee from war-torn Sudan
        and a black man who befriends Ku Klux Klan members
        were among about 50 speakers Friday to describe their
        experiences to Fieldstone Middle School students in Montvale.


        "They are speaking really about tolerance, forgiveness and peace,"
        Assistant Principal Mark Maire said of the daylong
        event titled, "Respect, Reflect, and Remember."

        "They are teaching the kids to look at people differently,
        to look at life differently, to appreciate other people and
        be thankful for what they have because you are dealing with
        Holocaust survivors and former Rwandan refugees who lost everything."



        Irene McNally, president of the Montvale Parent-Teacher
        Organization, said live presenters were a much more
        effective way for students to learn valuable life lessons.


        "Character education, which includes topics like bullying,
        being a good citizen and volunteering, is mandated by
        the state," said McNally, who helped organize the event.

        "If you tell kids about these events through
        textbooks, it feels rather sterile.
        But if you can show them a Holocaust survivor or a World War
        II camp liberator in flesh and blood, it makes it more real."

        Kristina Myers of the Alice Paul Institute told
        the students about Paul's struggles in the early
        1900s to help women earn the right to vote.


        "She was arrested, she went on hunger strikes, she
        did all of this because she believed in something
        very strongly," Myers said of the New Jersey activist.

        "So I'm hoping to pass to the kids that if they
        believe in something and they see an injustice,
        that they can change it just like Alice Paul did."


        Daryl Davis, an African-American, spoke about
        his experiences befriending and ultimately
        converting members of the Klan to tolerance.


        "Take the time to talk to people who are different than
        you and you can change the world," said Davis, who wrote a
        book, "Klan-Destine Relationships," about his experiences.


        Atem Ajok talked about the civil war in his
        native Sudan that destroyed his village and has
        resulted in the deaths of at least 2 million people.
        Ajok escaped to the United States after the U.S.
        government granted refugee status to about 3,800
        Sudanese young men displaced or orphaned by the war.


        "Genocidal war anywhere can be stopped
        if we all speak out," said Ajok, 25.

        "As the great Dr. Martin Luther King once said,
        at the end what we will remember is not the words
        of our enemies, but the silence of our friends."


        Holocaust survivor Arlette Michaelis grew up in Brussels,
        Belgium, during the Nazi occupation in World War II.

        Her parents and brother were imprisoned for anti-Nazi
        activities, including hiding Jews in their home.


        "You've got to be informed, listen and know history
        so that it doesn't repeat itself," Michaelis said.

        "And don't give your enemy the weapon of fear.

        You can never lose your hope in a better
        future and in your fight for freedom."


        State Sen. Gerald Cardinale, R-Cresskill,
        who attended, said he was very impressed.


        "It's amazing that they were able to put
        together -- the variety and quality of
        speakers in this program," Cardinale said.

        "When you see people who've lived these
        experiences, it personalizes in a way
        that really brings it home to all of us.

        It becomes something that we feel a
        responsibility to do something about it."

        Many of the fifth- through eighth-grade
        students, who all wore maroon T-shirts with
        "Respect, Reflect, Remember" printed on the back,
        said they appreciated the value of what they heard.


        "I think it's a great opportunity for us to learn
        about people who come from different countries,"
        said fifth-grader Nick Hallowell, 11.

        "I learned that you should never give up in life."

        Eighth-grader Ryan Rosenthal also
        was happy with the knowledge he gained.

        "I learned how to be respectful, how to
        overcome challenges and how to deal with
        problems in your life," said Ryan, 14.


        Eleven-year-old April Hanna said her favorite
        speaker was Davis, who confronted the
        Klan members with understanding.


        "He influenced the KKK to not treat people differently,
        and that we're all equal," the fifth-grader said.

        "I learned a lot of things about life."


        Richard Williams, a survivor of the Oklahoma City bombing
        in 1995 who spoke about how he recovered from the traumatic
        event, said he got as much out of the day as the kids.


        "It's wonderful for me to be able to share my story with these
        children," said Williams, one of the last people pulled from
        the wreckage of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building.

        "It's a story of hope and healing and it's probably
        more cathartic for me than it is for the children."

        E-mail: dawkins@...
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