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Re: (Article) Fewer Americans call themselves Multi-Racial

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  • DENISE BAKER
    Oh yeah, your right...duh!! maybe in part then, because those who participated felt they only belong to one race ... From: Tyrone
    Message 1 of 9 , May 9, 2007
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      Oh yeah, your right...duh!! maybe in part then, because
      those who participated felt they only belong to one race


      ----- Original Message -----


      Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2007 11:46 AM
      Subject: Re: (Article) Fewer Americans call themselves Multi-Racial



      Then the numbers should be higher, not lower



      DENISE BAKER <bblueii@msn. com> wrote:


      But, which survey is this? I thought the US Census
      was conducted every decade the next will be 2010.
      For the stats to be accurate, they
      should at least be compared correctly...
      If this article is valid, however, these numbers may
      be partly due to people of mixed races not feeling like
      they belong to either of the races they were born unto...


       
      ----- Original Message -----


      Sent: Sunday, May 06, 2007 3:47 PM
      Subject: Re: (Article) Fewer Americans call themselves Multi-Racial



      Thanks for the article.
      I agree that we're a society that still thinks
      everyone can be indentified as just one race.
      There's a lot of pressure to pick
      one thing and identify with that,
      which I think is too bad.



      "multiracialbookclu b" <soaptalk@.. .> wrote:



      Fewer Americans call
      themselves Multi-racial


      By Haya El Nasser, USA TODAY, 04-05-2007

      The share of Americans who identify themselves as
      Multi-Racial has shrunk this decade, an unexpected
      trend in an increasingly diverse nation.

      About 1.9% of the people checked off more than one race
      in a 2005 Census Bureau survey of 3 million households,
      a meaningful decline from two surveys in 2000.

      "There's no overall explanation" for the drop, says Reynolds
      Farley, a research scientist at the University of Michigan's
      Institute for Social Research who analyzed the trend.

      The data show that the nation continues to wrestle with
      racial identity even in the face of growing diversity, he says.

      "We're a society where we still basically
      assume everyone is in one race," he says.

      Multi-Racial groups fought that concept in the 1990s ...

      Mixed-Race Americans lobbied the government
      to stop requiring people to 'choose one' race
      category on Census and other federal forms.

      The 2000 Census for the first time
      allowed people to check more than one race.

      About 2.4%, or 6.8 million people, did so in the full Census.

      [It was expected that] the numbers were likely to rise
      as more children were born to mixed-race parents and
      multiracial organizations sprouted on college campuses.

      The opposite happened.

      The Census Bureau's American Community Survey of 3
      million households a year shows a clear trend, Farley says.

      In the 2000 ACS, 2.1% checked more than one race.

      The drop to 1.9% in 2005 is "a slight decrease
      but statistically significant, " Farley says.

      Jungmiwha Bullock, president of the Association
      of MultiEthnic Americans, is not surprised.

      Some believe that identifying more than
      one race negates racial identity, she says.
      ... "I don't say I'm half Black and half Korean.
      I'm 100% Black, and I'm 100% Korean."

      The Census numbers "clearly underestimate
      how many people are Mixed-Race," says Daniel
      Lichter, a professor at Cornell University ...

      "There's a lot of pressure from society to choose one race,"
      says Sara Ferry, 28, a school psychologist in Philadelphia
      who has a "black" father and a Chinese-American mother.
      "That's unfortunate. "

      SOURCE:
      http://www.usatoday .com/news/ nation/2007- 05-04-multiracia l_N.htm?csp= 34



    • miss.maxwell
      I think these numbers will change in time. Some people are so used to the requirement to check only one race, that they do so automatically. I know that when I
      Message 2 of 9 , May 14, 2007
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        I think these numbers will change in time.
        Some people are so used to the requirement to check
        only one race, that they do so automatically.
        I know that when I was growing up in school, I protested the
        fact that I could only choose one race for a long time until
        I finally gave in and only checked like my teachers told me.
        I do it today out of habit. Until i read this article, I didn't
        even know that I could check more than one box on the census.


        "DENISE BAKER" <bblueii@... > wrote:


        Oh yeah, your right...duh!! maybe in part then, because
        those who participated felt they only belong to one race


        TY ANDERSON <gemini072@... > wrote:


        Then the numbers should be higher, not lower


        DENISE BAKER <bblueii@... > wrote:


        But, which survey is this? I thought the US Census
        was conducted every decade the next will be 2010.
        For the stats to be accurate, they
        should at least be compared correctly...
        If this article is valid, however, these numbers may
        be partly due to people of mixed races not feeling like
        they belong to either of the races they were born unto...


        MULATTA_LOCA <rosanna_armendariz@... > wrote:


        Thanks for the article.
        I agree that we're a society that still thinks
        everyone can be indentified as just one race.
        There's a lot of pressure to pick
        one thing and identify with that,
        which I think is too bad.


        "MULTIRACIALBOOKCLUB" <soaptalk@... > wrote:


        Fewer Americans call themselves Multi-racial


        By Haya El Nasser, USA TODAY, 04-05-2007

        The share of Americans who identify themselves as
        Multi-Racial has shrunk this decade, an unexpected
        trend in an increasingly diverse nation.

        About 1.9% of the people checked off more than one race
        in a 2005 Census Bureau survey of 3 million households,
        a meaningful decline from two surveys in 2000.

        "There's no overall explanation" for the drop, says Reynolds
        Farley, a research scientist at the University of Michigan's
        Institute for Social Research who analyzed the trend.

        The data show that the nation continues to wrestle with
        racial identity even in the face of growing diversity, he says.

        "We're a society where we still basically
        assume everyone is in one race," he says.

        Multi-Racial groups fought that concept in the 1990s ...

        Mixed-Race Americans lobbied the government
        to stop requiring people to 'choose one' race
        category on Census and other federal forms.

        The 2000 Census for the first time
        allowed people to check more than one race.

        About 2.4%, or 6.8 million people, did so in the full Census.

        [It was expected that] the numbers were likely to rise
        as more children were born to mixed-race parents and
        multiracial organizations sprouted on college campuses.

        The opposite happened.

        The Census Bureau's American Community Survey of 3
        million households a year shows a clear trend, Farley says.

        In the 2000 ACS, 2.1% checked more than one race.

        The drop to 1.9% in 2005 is "a slight decrease
        but statistically significant," Farley says.

        Jungmiwha Bullock, president of the Association
        of MultiEthnic Americans, is not surprised.

        Some believe that identifying more than
        one race negates racial identity, she says.
        ... "I don't say I'm half Black and half Korean.
        I'm 100% Black, and I'm 100% Korean."

        The Census numbers "clearly underestimate
        how many people are Mixed-Race," says Daniel
        Lichter, a professor at Cornell University ...

        "There's a lot of pressure from society to choose one race,"
        says Sara Ferry, 28, a school psychologist in Philadelphia
        who has a "black" father and a Chinese-American mother.
        "That's unfortunate."

        SOURCE:
        http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-05-04-multiracial_N.htm?csp=34
      • wintyreeve@aol.com
        Hello Friends, As far as calling one self multi racial sometimes you don t have a choice... I had to file a police report and because my children appear to
        Message 3 of 9 , May 14, 2007
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          Hello Friends,

          As far as calling one self "multi racial"
          sometimes you don't have a choice...

          I had to file a police report and because my children appear
          to be "white", my race was listed as "white" on the report--
          even though you can clearly tell I am mixed with something.

          I was not asked about my race or given a choice.

          That kind of thing happens to me a lot, and to my kids,
          someone will guess and put a check mark where
          they think it goes not where it belongs.

          OR there are times when the term
          "multi racial" does not exist,
          and you are forced to choose one race.

          I never do an leave my race blank--who knows
          what the computers and bureacracy says.

          Last thought I am a single parent raising two multi-racial children.
          The "specimen" will not recognize my children as multi-racial
          (another tangent -- you will hear more about ...) and so if I did not
          teach them, and encourage pride in who they are they would not know.
          The paternal grandfather is a closet racist, he says
          things in front of my kids like all Africans are heathens
          and are going to hell because they are not "christian".
          The grandmother is just as bad. The first thing she said to
          me was, "So what are you anyways". She also saw someone who
          she thought was Jewish ... I was just disgusted when she
          said "Looks like they have the map of Israel on their face."

          So for me I feel my kids face a lot of opposition
          for being who they are--and its worse to face
          those challenges in your own family.

          Once again, an interesting conversation!

          Blessings ~ Lynn




        • kier22_2
          Hi Lynn, I can relate to your frusteration. I look like almost everything ... lol. Be strong, your relatives wont change their minds but your children will be
          Message 4 of 9 , May 15, 2007
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            Hi Lynn,

            I can relate to your frusteration. I look like almost everything
            ... lol. Be strong, your relatives wont change their minds
            but your children will be able to see for themselves
            why their Grandpa & Grandmas views are skewed.
            I hope they can come out of it stronger too.
            The way you speak I am sure they will. Keep up the good work!



            In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
            wintyreeve@... wrote:



            Hello Friends,

            As far as calling one self "multi racial"
            sometimes you don't have a choice...

            I had to file a police report and because my children appear
            to be "white", my race was listed as "white" on the report--
            even though you can clearly tell I am mixed with something.

            I was not asked about my race or given a choice.

            That kind of thing happens to me a lot, and to my kids,
            someone will guess and put a check mark where
            they think it goes not where it belongs.

            OR there are times when the term
            "multi racial" does not exist,
            and you are forced to choose one race.

            I never do an leave my race blank--who knows
            what the computers and bureacracy says.

            Last thought I am a single parent raising two multi-racial children.

            The "specimen" will not recognize my children as multi-racial
            (another tangent -- you will hear more about ...) and so if I did not
            teach them, and encourage pride in who they are they would not know.
            The paternal grandfather is a closet racist, he says
            things in front of my kids like all Africans are heathens
            and are going to hell because they are not "christian".
            The grandmother is just as bad. The first thing she said to
            me was, "So what are you anyways". She also saw someone who
            she thought was Jewish ... I was just disgusted when she
            said "Looks like they have the map of Israel on their face."

            So for me I feel my kids face a lot of opposition
            for being who they are--and its worse to face
            those challenges in your own family.

            Once again, an interesting conversation!

            Blessings ~ Lynn
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