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She was "All That," Margaret Murray. . .

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  • tlbaker
    She was All That, Margaret Murray. . . March 9 Margaret Murray *On this date in 1865, Margaret Murray was born. She was an African-American educator and
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 9, 2007

       

      She was "All That," Margaret Murray. . .

       

       

       

      March 9

      Margaret
      Murray



      *On this date in 1865, Margaret Murray was born.


      She was an African-American color

      educator and clubwoman.

      The child of a Black woman and White father,
      she was from Macon, Mississippi.

      After the death of her father at the age of seven,
      Quakers took her in and it was there that she
      received much guidance and education.

      She entered Fisk University
      in 1881 to become a teacher.

      Married to Booker T. Washington in 1893 (his third wife),
      she stood steadfastly beside him in making his dream
      of a great school (Tuskegee institue) come true.

      Murray joined the staff there and became the
      dean of the woman's department after one year.

      Murray-Washington was the director of the Girl’s institute
      at Tuskegee, which provided courses in laundering, cooking,
      dressmaking, sewing, millinery, and mattress making;
      skills which students were to use in maintaining
      healthy, efficient, and gracious homes.

      Called "one of the greatest women of her century", Margaret
      Murray Washington spoke to national audiences as the first
      president of the National Federation of Colored color Women’s Clubs.

      But her greatest service came as a graduate of Fisk University
      and teacher at Tuskegee, where she founded country schools,
      taught women how to live and attend to their homes,
      worked for the improvement of prisons, started
      the Mt. Meigs school for boys and an industrial
      school for girls, and constantly worked for
      the betterment of the poor and neglected.

      In 1896, she became vice president of the
      National Federation of Afro-American Women.

      Soon after she became president of the Alabama
      Association of Women’s Clubs until her death in 1925.

      Murray-Washington was a woman of great compassion,
      intelligence and independence of judgment.

      She became one of the greatest forces at Tuskegee and
      among black leaders and thinkers in the America.

       

       

       

       

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