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Re: Hello, New Member

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  • moltenlava_cat
    Well I ve actually put some thought into this (although it may not seem that way). But I ve decided to just stick with what I know. I won t use either term.
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 2, 2006
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      Well I've actually put some thought into
      this (although it may not seem that way).
      But I've decided to just stick with what I know.
      I won't use either term.
      African-American isn't true,
      I was born in the US, and last time
      I checked my skin is still brown.
      So I'll just call myself brown, I
      feel more comfortable with this term.
      But thank you for your advice, Jeff.
      ______________________________________________________________________

      "'"Yet I still wonder if I'm supposed to just
      consider myself (the way I'm been told, and
      at times, forced) `African-American' or "black".""



      Only call yourself that if it's how you truly feel.
      If you don't "feel" that way and can be objective with
      yourself that it's genuine, and not a discomfort with
      being "black", etc then I suggest you start to explore
      your components and see what intuitively seems to be
      most compatable with your temperment and personality.

      Some who have known you for a while, including family,
      may be condescending or hostile to you about this
      so you may want to keep it to yourself or only
      share it with those who are the most open-minded.
      When we are starting on a new path it is easy to get
      sidetracked by the negativity and ignorance of others.

      And I'm sure you'll find some support in this group too ;)

      BTW welcome aboard!!

      Jeff
    • moltenlava_cat
      I was suprised too, considering that particular incident was in high school, but yes. It usually happened because of my answers on the forms issued to students
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 2, 2006
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        I was suprised too, considering that particular incident was in
        high school, but yes. It usually happened because of my answers
        on the forms issued to students for the standardized testing.
        I can recall a time when, one of the women (who was in charge of
        checking the validity of the forms) refused to believe me at first.
        I stood my ground, and made sure she knew I wasn't joking.
        Sad part is some of my teachers, were more accepting
        of students like me, than the staff.

        ______________________________________________________________________


        OK, here you are, welcome Moltenlava!



        I'm a young college student, with an interest in languages
        and other cultures. Growing up this, Being Multi-Racial
        concept, was virtually unheard of in the schools I attended.
        Or people, majority authority figures, had the tendency
        to not believe me (or in other cases, tell me not to fabricate
        my ancestral origin)! An unfortunate side effect of growing
        up American, how often does this occur elsewhere?



        WOW, that is amazing, how can someone tell you
        that you are lying about your ancestry and you
        are YOUNG and in 2006 experiencing this!!
        I would expect this to happen to an 'old lady'
        like me, LOLOL, growing up as a child in
        the early to mid 70's. Guess I am naive.
        You are who you are if they don't
        believe you it is not your problem.


        You've come to the right place, welcome again!



        Lynne
      • docilechicken24
        I ve dealt with those issues some, since I recently found out basically my whole family knows about the multiple heritages (one or two flat out deny, but
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 2, 2006
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          I've dealt with those issues some, since I recently found out
          basically my whole family knows about the multiple heritages
          (one or two flat out deny, but there's been genetic-testing
          done so there's no question) yet I am the only 'person of color'
          in my family still and I am disturbing the flow and the "peace"
          -- by being real and acknowledging and embracing it.

          For me it ain't about comfort so much though.
          I don't know if I could really feel comfortable in any catgory.
          For me it is making sure my identity doesn't unjustly step on
          anyone's feet, cause my Afro-American identity does, step on
          the feet of people close to me, it is polar opposite of white
          -- their chosen 'identity' --so it makes them uncomfortable and
          challenges previously held notions, perceptions, and stereotypes.

          I guess I have given up on fitting in (even though deep
          down I still want to) and have attempted to construct
          an identity that challenges and confronts society,
          an identity with social and political meaning.

          There is no right way to handle these issues I believe though,
          we each have slightly to very different specific circumstances,
          and we each gotta make peace in our own way in a way where
          we can cope the best and be happy and proud of who
          we have chosen to be or who we identify with.

          Dustin


          In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
          "moltenlava_cat" <moltenlava_cat@...>
          wrote:


          Well I've actually put some thought into
          this (although it may not seem that way).
          But I've decided to just stick with what I know.
          I won't use either term.
          African-American isn't true,
          I was born in the US, and last time
          I checked my skin is still brown.
          So I'll just call myself brown, I
          feel more comfortable with this term.
          But thank you for your advice, Jeff.


          _____________________________________________________________________



          "'"Yet I still wonder if I'm supposed to just
          consider myself (the way I'm been told, and
          at times, forced) `African-American' or "black".""




          Only call yourself that if it's how you truly feel.
          If you don't "feel" that way and can be objective with
          yourself that it's genuine, and not a discomfort with
          being "black", etc then I suggest you start to explore
          your components and see what intuitively seems to be
          most compatable with your temperment and personality.

          Some who have known you for a while, including family,
          may be condescending or hostile to you about this
          so you may want to keep it to yourself or only
          share it with those who are the most open-minded.
          When we are starting on a new path it is easy to get
          sidetracked by the negativity and ignorance of others.

          And I'm sure you'll find some support in this group too ;)

          BTW welcome aboard!!

          Jeff
        • tlbaker1
          Sad... ... From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of moltenlava_cat Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2006 1:06
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 2, 2006
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            Sad...

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com]
            On Behalf Of moltenlava_cat
            Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2006 1:06 PM
            To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Generation-Mixed] Re: Hello, New Member

            I was suprised too, considering that particular incident was in
            high school, but yes. It usually happened because of my answers
            on the forms issued to students for the standardized testing.
            I can recall a time when, one of the women (who was in charge of
            checking the validity of the forms) refused to believe me at first.
            I stood my ground, and made sure she knew I wasn't joking.
            Sad part is some of my teachers, were more accepting
            of students like me, than the staff.

            ______________________________________________________________________


            OK, here you are, welcome Moltenlava!



            I'm a young college student, with an interest in languages
            and other cultures. Growing up this, Being Multi-Racial
            concept, was virtually unheard of in the schools I attended.
            Or people, majority authority figures, had the tendency
            to not believe me (or in other cases, tell me not to fabricate
            my ancestral origin)! An unfortunate side effect of growing
            up American, how often does this occur elsewhere?



            WOW, that is amazing, how can someone tell you
            that you are lying about your ancestry and you
            are YOUNG and in 2006 experiencing this!!
            I would expect this to happen to an 'old lady'
            like me, LOLOL, growing up as a child in
            the early to mid 70's. Guess I am naive.
            You are who you are if they don't
            believe you it is not your problem.


            You've come to the right place, welcome again!



            Lynne




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