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Re: Racial Mis-Categorization & The USCB

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  • docilechicken24
    This is what is quite confusing to me, the term of Mixed-Race when only the One-Drop Rule exists in United States, even if it wasn t always like that in the
    Message 1 of 15 , Nov 2, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      This is what is quite confusing to me, the term of Mixed-Race when
      only the 'One-Drop Rule' exists in United States, even if it wasn't
      always like that in the census it has been the predominant racial
      concept that has governed our country. A drop made you "other".

      It is confusing because, from where I stand, 80-90%
      of "black" people are Mixed-Race and are Mulattoes.

      I have and I'm sure we all have met people [who are] “black" [and]
      who also have Indian, Chinese, and White ancestry in their heritage.

      The big question is, when does the definition of being "black"
      start reflecting what it actually means in this country (what
      it means refers to the composition of the members of the
      group called "black"), you are "black" or have been "black"
      (in this country) when you have a discernable or
      even provable on paper amount of african ancestry.

      I do recognize that conceptions are starting
      to change about who is Black or who is not.

      To me, Mixed-Race is basically implied within the label
      "black" due to the history and its present composition.

      I would agree that it was jacked up that America decided
      to impose such an abomination as the 'One-Drop Rule',
      but a bit of color changed your status and so that is how
      people have been interacting for a long time now.

      I am conflicted about solidarity. Either take a Mixed-Race title
      which divides and distinguishes us from our other "black" sisters
      and brothers (who are -- I'd argue by definition of "black" in
      America -- predominantly Mixed-Race) or accept the traditional label
      of "blackness" even though sometimes it feels like it doesn't fit.

      As far as being true to my other Ethnic influences regardless
      of the "racial" 'identification' I choose, I am sure to reveal
      all of my cultural backgrounds, White and Non-white..

      In reality, from my 'experiences', if I say I am Mixed-Race, I
      will be received by white people better and "black people" worse.

      This is the issue I have been battling with in
      my 'identity' [in choosing to say] "black" or
      Mixed-Race ... lately I have favored "black".

      The big conflict comes because an 'identification' as Mixed-Race,
      although my purpose would be accuracy of 'experiences', there
      is I believe still a differing and (better more acceptable) social
      status to those who consider themselves and identify themselves
      as Mixed-Race than as "black" or even [as] African-American.

      I can't help but feeling that although I don't mean to
      be snobby and telling people I am better than them,
      I still kind of am [giving that impression].

      What do y'all think, have any of y'all struggled with this issue.

      Dustin

      In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
      "multiracialbookclub" <soaptalk@...> wrote:



      Racial Mis-Categorization & The USCB

      Until the 1930 Census, the "Multi"-Racial Ancestry
      of the people who were of some part-Black admixture
      was openly acknowledged on U.S. Census Bureau
      Forms – (BUT -- unfortunately, was also left up
      to the scrutiny and sole-decision of the "subjective
      determination" of US Census Bureau workers.

      Even though, out of spite, racial bias or straight-out
      bigotry, the census workers often thought nothing
      of falsely referring to a "Multi"-Racial who was of
      part-Black ancestry as "N" for "Negro" or "B" for
      "Black" ----- sometimes an "M" was placed on the
      census forms representing "Mulatto" ("Mixed-Race")
      and / or eventually a "C" was used for "Colored" (which,
      at that time was indicative of "Multi"-Racial lineage).

      As a result of the application of Racist 'One Drop
      Rule'-based so-called "Racial-Integrity Laws", all
      of the "Multi"-Racials who were of any amount
      of part-Black ancestry were "legally- labeled"
      (and thus, misidentified) as being "Black" or "Negro"
      under the Racist of the concept of `Hypo-Descent'.

      In 1967, the US Supreme Court decision for
      Loving v. Virginia, ruled that the so-called
      "Racial-Integrity Laws" were Unconstitutional
      –which thereby should also have resulted in
      the overturning the "legality" of the application
      of the Racist "One Drop /Hypo-descent Rule".

      Even today, however, --- simply because so very many
      Multi-Generational Multi-Racially Mixed (MGM-Mixed)
      people have had parents and / or grandparents who were
      "legally-misidentified" on previous Census Forms (and
      by Census-based Birth/School/Death Records, in the past)
      -- millions of people who are clearly of MGM-Mixed
      lineage are still finding themselves continually
      misidentified as being of "mono"-racial lineage.

      [[MGM-Mixed=Multi-Generational Multiracially Mixed]]

      http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0056.html
      <http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0056.html>

      Related Links:

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1421
      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1421>

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1418
      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1418>

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1417
      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1417>

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1386
      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1386>
    • j s
      One of the reasons that [certain members of] the black community and political leadership has been a supporter of the One-Drop rule is that it increases their
      Message 2 of 15 , Nov 2, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        One of the reasons that [certain members of] the
        black community and political leadership has been
        a supporter of the One-Drop rule is that it increases
        their numbers and therefore their political clout.
        There is a fear that were all people of mixed ancestry to
        start labelling themselves as such that statistically the
        "black" population would no longer be a signifigant demographic,
        ----- especially since it has been eclipsed by Hispanics.
        Also, arguably, composition was never an issue so
        whether Mulatto, Passe-Blanc or almost Pure-African
        descent --- one's experience --- professionally,
        legally and sociologically were basically the same
        Post Civil War up until The Civil Rights Movement.

        Perhaps Hispanics are the best comparison to the concept
        of "blackness" in the US (even if it may be silly to us)
        in the sense that they aren't concerned with what
        percentage of which is their composition but instead
        see themselves as a 'unified' Culturally-Based 'Identity'.
        Being "black" often means the same thing
        (though I know there are alot of exceptions).
        [The term] "black" then transcends a racial
        classification and becomes a Cultural-Identity
        by virtue of sociological foundations /
        shared history and a default caste since
        one can never really rise above it.
         
           
        docilechicken24 <kjoule70@...> wrote:
        This is what is quite confusing to me, the term of Mixed-Race when
        only the 'One-Drop Rule' exists in United States, even if it wasn't
        always like that in the census it has been the predominant racial
        concept that has governed our country. A drop made you "other".

        It is confusing because, from where I stand, 80-90%
        of "black" people are Mixed-Race and are Mulattoes.

        I have and I'm sure we all have met people [who are] “black" [and]
        who also have Indian, Chinese, and White ancestry in their heritage.

        The big question is, when does the definition of being "black"
        start reflecting what it actually means in this country (what
        it means refers to the composition of the members of the
        group called "black"), you are "black" or have been "black"
        (in this country) when you have a discernable or
        even provable on paper amount of african ancestry.

        I do recognize that conceptions are starting
        to change about who is Black or who is not.

        To me, Mixed-Race is basically implied within the label
        "black" due to the history and its present composition.

        I would agree that it was jacked up that America decided
        to impose such an abomination as the 'One-Drop Rule',
        but a bit of color changed your status and so that is how
        people have been interacting for a long time now.

        I am conflicted about solidarity. Either take a Mixed-Race title
        which divides and distinguishes us from our other "black" sisters
        and brothers (who are -- I'd argue by definition of "black" in
        America -- predominantly Mixed-Race) or accept the traditional label
        of "blackness" even though sometimes it feels like it doesn't fit.

        As far as being true to my other Ethnic influences regardless
        of the "racial" 'identification' I choose, I am sure to reveal
        all of my cultural backgrounds, White and Non-white..

        In reality, from my 'experiences' , if I say I am Mixed-Race, I
        will be received by white people better and "black people" worse.

        This is the issue I have been battling with in
        my 'identity' [in choosing to say] "black" or
        Mixed-Race ... lately I have favored "black".

        The big conflict comes because an 'identification' as Mixed-Race,
        although my purpose would be accuracy of 'experiences' , there
        is I believe still a differing and (better more acceptable) social
        status to those who consider themselves and identify themselves
        as Mixed-Race than as "black" or even [as] African-American.

        I can't help but feeling that although I don't mean to
        be snobby and telling people I am better than them,
        I still kind of am [giving that impression].

        What do y'all think, have any of y'all struggled with this issue.

        Dustin

        In Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com,
        "multiracialbookclu b" <soaptalk@.. .> wrote:

        Racial Mis-Categorization & The USCB

        Until the 1930 Census, the "Multi"-Racial Ancestry
        of the people who were of some part-Black admixture
        was openly acknowledged on U.S. Census Bureau
        Forms – (BUT -- unfortunately, was also left up
        to the scrutiny and sole-decision of the "subjective
        determination" of US Census Bureau workers.

        Even though, out of spite, racial bias or straight-out
        bigotry, the census workers often thought nothing
        of falsely referring to a "Multi"-Racial who was of
        part-Black ancestry as "N" for "Negro" or "B" for
        "Black" ----- sometimes an "M" was placed on the
        census forms representing "Mulatto" ("Mixed-Race" )
        and / or eventually a "C" was used for "Colored" (which,
        at that time was indicative of "Multi"-Racial lineage).

        As a result of the application of Racist 'One Drop
        Rule'-based so-called "Racial-Integrity Laws", all
        of the "Multi"-Racials who were of any amount
        of part-Black ancestry were "legally- labeled"
        (and thus, misidentified) as being "Black" or "Negro"
        under the Racist of the concept of `Hypo-Descent' .

        In 1967, the US Supreme Court decision for
        Loving v. Virginia, ruled that the so-called
        "Racial-Integrity Laws" were Unconstitutional
        –which thereby should also have resulted in
        the overturning the "legality" of the application
        of the Racist "One Drop /Hypo-descent Rule".

        Even today, however, --- simply because so very many
        Multi-Generational Multi-Racially Mixed (MGM-Mixed)
        people have had parents and / or grandparents who were
        "legally-misidentif ied" on previous Census Forms (and
        by Census-based Birth/School/ Death Records, in the past)
        -- millions of people who are clearly of MGM-Mixed
        lineage are still finding themselves continually
        misidentified as being of "mono"-racial lineage.

        [[MGM-Mixed= Multi-Generation al Multiracially Mixed]]

        http://www.census. gov/population/ www/documentatio n/twps0056. html
        <http://www.census. gov/population/ www/documentatio n/twps0056. html>

        Related Links:

        http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1421
        <http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1421>

        http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1418
        <http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1418>

        http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1417
        <http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1417>

        http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1386
        <http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1386>



        Want to start your own business? Learn how on Yahoo! Small Business.

      • tlbaker1
        Dustin, I agree with all your comments “black” people [being] mixed-race even [if] just from slavery only. Well, for me I have been in a state of
        Message 3 of 15 , Nov 2, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Dustin, I agree with all your comments' �black� people
          [being] mixed-race even [if] just from slavery only.

          Well, for me I have been in a state of confusion about my
          race and mostly family members on and off for a while
          since I was very little until about 10-15 years ago.
          We would go visit the relatives in NC / VA, etc., and I
          would see these �white� looking people who were supposed
          to be �black� or at least I assumed they were because
          they were my family or was told, can't remember now.
          I was 5ish at the time I was very
          weirded out by these "strange" people.
          I remember my mother trying to explain to me why I looked
          different from the other little girls at school / block.

          My grandfather whom was in WW2 who go to the �black� /
          �colored� mess hall and people who ask him why he is there.
          He said 'I am �black� (may have called himself �colored�),
          can't you tell (not really) look at my hair' (ok,
          so he doesn't have straight blonde hair...).
          He was fighting to[be] black it seems.

          Then I grew up w/the "different" mother who didn't look like everyone
          else's mother, I used to think she was �white� when I was very little.
          Father is dark skinned, mixed race as well.
          Seems as though back in the 60's / 70's and before being
          Mixed / biracial (especially biracial) was something
          that was not talked about much -- as though it didn't
          exist - period you were �pure black� that's it.
          Maybe because back then it was taboo because most people thought
          it was directly related to slavery or you shouldn't be proud to
          be mixed w/White people as they were the oppressor, who knows.
          But it seems it was OK to be mixed w/Native though - I think
          it was OK to be mixed w/Native in the 70's for anyone, pretty
          fashionable back then to claim Native ancestry, still is...
          I had a Cher doll that was darker than I am w/long black
          hair down to her knees in the 70's - she looks nothing
          like that now, well never really did, somewhat, though.
          I once asked a friend at day camp once (I was about 10, I grew
          up in the Bronx) if she were mixed and you would have thought I
          asked her if she were �, she didn't answer, was kind of afraid -
          maybe because we were young.I wasn't going to stop being her f
          riend or make fun of her, I was just curious, already knew anyway.
          She looked like a �white� girl w/a very deep tan
          even her hair was completely straight, no curl at all.
          Her brother, on the other hand, told us his father was
          Italian, we were having some kind of deep conversation.
          I recall having pretty deep discussions w/my friends when
          I was young especially about race and they were pretty
          accurate too for the most part now that I recall.

          So, the point I am trying to make is that although I �identify�
          with being �black� and have no problem w/it; however, I was
          unable to categorize myself as I knew I was "different"
          because of my ancestry but because I was not quote unquote
          �biracial� (although if you saw my mother you might think
          otherwise) and sometimes look �more biracial� than people who
          actually are (we know this doesn't matter just my trying to sort
          out my �identity� prior to �enlightenment�, LOL) then 'what I am I'.

          I once had a conversation w/a biracial guy friend of my telling him
          that he had an explanation for who he was but �what was my deal?�.

          I actually found this group by accident,looking
          for African-American Incredimail yahoogroup
          (www.incredimail.com) an email
          program with picture stationery.

          The groups share and create
          the stationary, I have tons.

          I read the description and joined.

          Lynne

          -----Original Message-----

          Mail To:Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com]
          On Behalf Of docilechicken24
          Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2006 12:37 PM
          To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: Racial Mis-Categorization & The USCB

          This is what is quite confusing to me, the term of Mixed-Race when
          only the 'One-Drop Rule' exists in United States, even if it wasn't
          always like that in the census it has been the predominant racial
          concept that has governed our country. A drop made you "other".

          It is confusing because, from where I stand, 80-90%
          of "black" people are Mixed-Race and are Mulattoes.

          I have and I'm sure we all have met people [who are] "black" [and]
          who also have Indian, Chinese, and White ancestry in their heritage.

          The big question is, when does the definition of being "black"
          start reflecting what it actually means in this country (what
          it means refers to the composition of the members of the
          group called "black"), you are "black" or have been "black"
          (in this country) when you have a discernable or
          even provable on paper amount of african ancestry.

          I do recognize that conceptions are starting
          to change about who is Black or who is not.

          To me, Mixed-Race is basically implied within the label
          "black" due to the history and its present composition.

          I would agree that it was jacked up that America decided
          to impose such an abomination as the 'One-Drop Rule',
          but a bit of color changed your status and so that is how
          people have been interacting for a long time now.

          I am conflicted about solidarity. Either take a Mixed-Race title
          which divides and distinguishes us from our other "black" sisters
          and brothers (who are -- I'd argue by definition of "black" in
          America -- predominantly Mixed-Race) or accept the traditional label
          of "blackness" even though sometimes it feels like it doesn't fit.

          As far as being true to my other Ethnic influences regardless
          of the "racial" 'identification' I choose, I am sure to reveal
          all of my cultural backgrounds, White and Non-white..

          In reality, from my 'experiences', if I say I am Mixed-Race, I
          will be received by white people better and "black people" worse.

          This is the issue I have been battling with in
          my 'identity' [in choosing to say] "black" or
          Mixed-Race ... lately I have favored "black".

          The big conflict comes because an 'identification' as Mixed-Race,
          although my purpose would be accuracy of 'experiences', there
          is I believe still a differing and (better more acceptable) social
          status to those who consider themselves and identify themselves
          as Mixed-Race than as "black" or even [as] African-American.

          I can't help but feeling that although I don't mean to
          be snobby and telling people I am better than them,
          I still kind of am [giving that impression].

          What do y'all think, have any of y'all struggled with this issue.

          Dustin

          In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
          "multiracialbookclub" <soaptalk@...> wrote:



          Racial Mis-Categorization & The USCB

          Until the 1930 Census, the "Multi"-Racial Ancestry
          of the people who were of some part-Black admixture
          was openly acknowledged on U.S. Census Bureau
          Forms - (BUT -- unfortunately, was also left up
          to the scrutiny and sole-decision of the "subjective
          determination" of US Census Bureau workers.

          Even though, out of spite, racial bias or straight-out
          bigotry, the census workers often thought nothing
          of falsely referring to a "Multi"-Racial who was of
          part-Black ancestry as "N" for "Negro" or "B" for
          "Black" ----- sometimes an "M" was placed on the
          census forms representing "Mulatto" ("Mixed-Race")
          and / or eventually a "C" was used for "Colored" (which,
          at that time was indicative of "Multi"-Racial lineage).

          As a result of the application of Racist 'One Drop
          Rule'-based so-called "Racial-Integrity Laws", all
          of the "Multi"-Racials who were of any amount
          of part-Black ancestry were "legally- labeled"
          (and thus, misidentified) as being "Black" or "Negro"
          under the Racist of the concept of `Hypo-Descent'.

          In 1967, the US Supreme Court decision for
          Loving v. Virginia, ruled that the so-called
          "Racial-Integrity Laws" were Unconstitutional
          -which thereby should also have resulted in
          the overturning the "legality" of the application
          of the Racist "One Drop /Hypo-descent Rule".

          Even today, however, --- simply because so very many
          Multi-Generational Multi-Racially Mixed (MGM-Mixed)
          people have had parents and / or grandparents who were
          "legally-misidentified" on previous Census Forms (and
          by Census-based Birth/School/Death Records, in the past)
          -- millions of people who are clearly of MGM-Mixed
          lineage are still finding themselves continually
          misidentified as being of "mono"-racial lineage.

          [[MGM-Mixed=Multi-Generational Multiracially Mixed]]

          http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0056.html
          <http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0056.html>

          Related Links:

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1421
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1421>

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1418
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1418>

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1417
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1417>

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1386
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1386>




          Yahoo! Groups Links
        • tlbaker1
          If everyone started labeling themselves as mixed race do you think the demographic would actually change (maybe on paper?). Will the government / establishment
          Message 4 of 15 , Nov 2, 2006
          • 0 Attachment

            If everyone started labelling themselves as mixed race do you
            think the demographic would actually change (maybe on paper?).
            Will the government / establishment simply say OK,
            this is what "they" are calling themselves these day....




            Not in this lifetime



            <<< (though I know there are alot of exceptions).
            [The term] "black" then transcends a racial
            classification and becomes a Cultural-Identity
            by virtue of sociological foundations /
            shared history and a default caste since
            one can never really rise above it.>>>>


             


            From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com ]
            On Behalf Of
            j s
            Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2006 3:21 PM
            To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: Racial Mis-Categorization & The USCB

             

            One of the reasons that [certain members of] the
            black community and political leadership has been
            a supporter of the One-Drop rule is that it increases
            their numbers and therefore their political clout.
            There is a fear that were all people of mixed ancestry to
            start labelling themselves as such that statistically the
            "black" population would no longer be a signifigant demographic,
            ----- especially since it has been eclipsed by Hispanics.
            Also, arguably, composition was never an issue so
            whether Mulatto, Passe-Blanc or almost Pure-African
            descent --- one's experience --- professionally,
            legally and sociologically were basically the same
            Post Civil War up until The Civil Rights Movement.

            Perhaps Hispanics are the best comparison to the concept
            of "blackness" in the US (even if it may be silly to us)
            in the sense that they aren't concerned with what
            percentage of which is their composition but instead
            see themselves as a 'unified' Culturally-Based 'Identity'.
            Being "black" often means the same thing
            (though I know there are alot of exceptions).
            [The term] "black" then transcends a racial
            classification and becomes a Cultural-Identity
            by virtue of sociological foundations /
            shared history and a default caste since
            one can never really rise above it.

             

               
            docilechicken24 <kjoule70@...> wrote:

            This is what is quite confusing to me, the term of Mixed-Race when
            only the 'One-Drop Rule' exists in United States , even if it wasn't
            always like that in the census it has been the predominant racial
            concept that has governed our country. A drop made you "other".

            It is confusing because, from where I stand, 80-90%
            of "black" people are Mixed-Race and are Mulattoes.

            I have and I'm sure we all have met people [who are] “black" [and]
            who also have Indian, Chinese, and White ancestry in their heritage.

            The big question is, when does the definition of being "black"
            start reflecting what it actually means in this country (what
            it means refers to the composition of the members of the
            group called "black"), you are "black" or have been "black"
            (in this country) when you have a discernable or
            even provable on paper amount of african ancestry.

            I do recognize that conceptions are starting
            to change about who is Black or who is not.

            To me, Mixed-Race is basically implied within the label
            "black" due to the history and its present composition.

            I would agree that it was jacked up that America decided
            to impose such an abomination as the 'One-Drop Rule',
            but a bit of color changed your status and so that is how
            people have been interacting for a long time now.

            I am conflicted about solidarity. Either take a Mixed-Race title
            which divides and distinguishes us from our other "black" sisters
            and brothers (who are -- I'd argue by definition of "black" in
            America -- predominantly Mixed-Race) or accept the traditional label
            of "blackness" even though sometimes it feels like it doesn't fit.

            As far as being true to my other Ethnic influences regardless
            of the "racial" 'identification' I choose, I am sure to reveal
            all of my cultural backgrounds, White and Non-white..

            In reality, from my 'experiences' , if I say I am Mixed-Race, I
            will be received by white people better and "black people" worse.

            This is the issue I have been battling with in
            my 'identity' [in choosing to say] "black" or
            Mixed-Race ... lately I have favored "black".

            The big conflict comes because an 'identification' as Mixed-Race,
            although my purpose would be accuracy of 'experiences' , there
            is I believe still a differing and (better more acceptable) social
            status to those who consider themselves and identify themselves
            as Mixed-Race than as "black" or even [as] African-American.

            I can't help but feeling that although I don't mean to
            be snobby and telling people I am better than them,
            I still kind of am [giving that impression].

            What do y'all think, have any of y'all struggled with this issue.

            Dustin

            In Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com,
            "multiracialbookclu b" <soaptalk@.. .> wrote:

            Racial Mis-Categorization & The USCB

            Until the 1930 Census, the "Multi"-Racial Ancestry
            of the people who were of some part-Black admixture
            was openly acknowledged on U.S. Census Bureau
            Forms – (BUT -- unfortunately, was also left up
            to the scrutiny and sole-decision of the "subjective
            determination" of US Census Bureau workers.

            Even though, out of spite, racial bias or straight-out
            bigotry, the census workers often thought nothing
            of falsely referring to a "Multi"-Racial who was of
            part-Black ancestry as "N" for "Negro" or "B" for
            "Black" ----- sometimes an "M" was placed on the
            census forms representing "Mulatto" ("Mixed-Race" )
            and / or eventually a "C" was used for "Colored" (which,
            at that time was indicative of "Multi"-Racial lineage).

            As a result of the application of Racist 'One Drop
            Rule'-based so-called "Racial-Integrity Laws", all
            of the "Multi"-Racials who were of any amount
            of part-Black ancestry were "legally- labeled"
            (and thus, misidentified) as being "Black" or "Negro"
            under the Racist of the concept of `Hypo-Descent' .

            In 1967, the US Supreme Court decision for
            Loving v. Virginia , ruled that the so-called
            "Racial-Integrity Laws" were Unconstitutional
            –which thereby should also have resulted in
            the overturning the "legality" of the application
            of the Racist "One Drop /Hypo-descent Rule".

            Even today, however, --- simply because so very many
            Multi-Generational Multi-Racially Mixed (MGM-Mixed)
            people have had parents and / or grandparents who were
            "legally-misidentif ied" on previous Census Forms (and
            by Census-based Birth/School/ Death Records, in the past)
            -- millions of people who are clearly of MGM-Mixed
            lineage are still finding themselves continually
            misidentified as being of "mono"-racial lineage.

            [[MGM-Mixed= Multi-Generation al Multiracially Mixed]]

            http://www.census. gov/population/ www/documentatio n/twps0056. html
            <http://www.census. gov/population/ www/documentatio n/twps0056. html>

            Related Links:

            http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1421
            <http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1421>

            http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1418
            <http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1418>

            http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1417
            <http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1417>

            http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1386
            <http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Generation -Mixed/message/ 1386>

             

             


            Want to start your own business? Learn how on Yahoo! Small Business.

          • Susan
            I am new here. My daughter is 11 and she is 1/2 black and /White.. I posted a pic of us under the kid section. We live in California. Where is everyone else
            Message 5 of 15 , Nov 3, 2006
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              I am new here. My daughter is 11 and she is 1/2 black and /White..
              I posted a pic of us under the kid section.
              We live in California. Where is everyone else from ?
              Susan
            • multiracialbookclub
              Hi Susan, , Welcome to Gen-Mixed ! We are so glad that you decided to become a part of our online community. [=D ] This is a great group and we are sure you
              Message 6 of 15 , Nov 3, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Susan, ,

                Welcome to 'Gen-Mixed'!

                We are so glad that you decided to
                become a part of our
                online community.=D>

                This is a great group and we are sure you will have
                the chance to meet a lot of fantastic new friends
                here -- who understand many of your experiences
                as the parent of a Bi-Racial / Mixed-Race child.:)

                Welcome again -- and have a great day!!!

                -- M


                 In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
                "Susan" <sroshau@...> wrote:

                 I am new here. My daughter is 11 and she is 1/2 black and /White..
                 I posted a pic of us under the kid section.
                 We live in California. Where is everyone else from ?
                 Susan
              • multiracialbookclub
                Wow ... that s great!!! You -- like so many other people here --- are a great member -- what you ve shared has been so helpful -- and we are all so glad that
                Message 7 of 15 , Nov 3, 2006
                • 0 Attachment

                  Wow ... that's great!!!

                  You -- like so many other people here --- are
                  a great member -- what you've shared has
                  been so helpful -- and we are all so glad
                  that you've joined 'the community' !!=D>

                  Hey... ya' know what I'm starting to think
                  ... maybe it wasn't even an 'ac-ci-dent'
                  ... so much as it was 'pro-vi-dence'.  ;;)

                  Have a great day, Lynne!!! :)



                  In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
                  "tlbaker1" <tlbaker1@...> wrote:

                  ... I actually found this group by accident
                  ... I read the description and joined.

                  Lynne


                • SUSAN ROSHAU
                  Thanks for the warm welcome ! Susan multiracialbookclub wrote: Hi Susan, , Welcome to Gen-Mixed ! We are so glad that you decided to
                  Message 8 of 15 , Nov 3, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thanks for the warm welcome !
                    Susan

                    multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@...> wrote:
                    Hi Susan, ,

                    Welcome to 'Gen-Mixed'!

                    We are so glad that you decided to
                    become a part of our
                    online community.=D>

                    This is a great group and we are sure you will have
                    the chance to meet a lot of fantastic new friends
                    here -- who understand many of your experiences
                    as the parent of a Bi-Racial / Mixed-Race child.:)

                    Welcome again -- and have a great day!!!

                    -- M


                     In Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com,
                    "Susan" <sroshau@...> wrote:

                     I am new here. My daughter is 11 and she is 1/2 black and /White..
                     I posted a pic of us under the kid section.
                     We live in California. Where is everyone else from ?
                     Susan



                    Susan Roshau


                    We have the perfect Group for you. Check out the handy changes to Yahoo! Groups.

                  • tlbaker1
                    Hi Susan, Welcome, I am from NYC, no children, just me!! This is a great place to be. Lynne ... From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                    Message 9 of 15 , Nov 4, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hi Susan,

                      Welcome, I am from NYC, no children, just me!!
                      This is a great place to be.

                      Lynne

                      -----Original Message-----

                      From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                      [mailto:Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com]
                      On Behalf Of Susan
                      Sent: Saturday, November 04, 2006 1:12 AM
                      To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [Generation-Mixed] NEW

                      I am new here. My daughter is 11 and she is 1/2 black and /White..
                      I posted a pic of us under the kid section.
                      We live in California. Where is everyone else from ?
                      Susan
                    • tlbaker1
                      Thanks, Multi, it is great to be here indeed. I always thought you had to actually be biracial w/one Black parent and one White parent to be of true
                      Message 10 of 15 , Nov 4, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment

                        Thanks, Multi, it is great to be here indeed.

                        I always thought you had to actually be biracial w/one
                        Black parent and one White parent to be of true Mixed-Race.

                        But then I found myself not quite fitting into the
                        definition of being Black so I just tried to adapt
                        as best as I could - not White not quite Black either.

                        It is really more of a spiritual thing rather than
                        appearance as I am not looking in the mirror all day long.
                        I do feel the presence of my ancestors at times w/in me.

                         

                        Lynne

                         


                        From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                        [mailto: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com ]
                        On Behalf Of
                        multiracialbookclub
                        Sent: Saturday, November 04, 2006 2:03 AM
                        To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [Generation-Mixed] Lynne's finding of the group

                         

                        Wow ... that's great!!!

                        You -- like so many other people here --- are
                        a great member -- what you've shared has
                        been so helpful -- and we are all so glad
                        that you've joined 'the community' !!=D>

                        Hey... ya' know what I'm starting to think
                        ... maybe it wasn't even an 'ac-ci-dent'
                        ... so much as it was 'pro-vi-dence'.  ;;)

                        Have a great day, Lynne!!! :)



                        In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
                        "tlbaker1" <tlbaker1@...> wrote:

                        ... I actually found this group by accident
                        ... I read the description and joined.

                        Lynne

                      • barac1998@aol.com
                        I actually live in nortrthern california. welcome ... From: sroshau@yahoo.com To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com Sent: Fri, 3 Nov 2006 10:12 PM Subject:
                        Message 11 of 15 , Nov 4, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                           I actually live in nortrthern california. welcome
                           
                           
                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: sroshau@...
                          To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Fri, 3 Nov 2006 10:12 PM
                          Subject: [Generation-Mixed] NEW


                          I am new here. My daughter is 11 and she is 1/2 black and /White..
                          I posted a pic of us under the kid section.
                          We live in California. Where is everyone else from ?
                          Susan

                        • multiracialbookclub
                          Racial Mis-Categorization & The USCB Until the 1930 Census, the Multi -Racial Ancestry of the people who were of some part-Black admixture was openly
                          Message 12 of 15 , Mar 20, 2010
                          • 0 Attachment

                            Racial Mis-Categorization & The USCB


                            Until the 1930 Census, the "Multi"-Racial Ancestry 
                            of the people who were of some part-Black admixture 
                            was openly acknowledged on U.S. Census Bureau 
                            Forms – (BUT -- unfortunately, was also left up 
                            to the scrutiny and sole-decision of the "subjective 
                            determination" of US Census Bureau workers.

                            Even though, out of spite, racial bias or straight-out 
                            bigotry, the census workers often thought nothing 
                            of falsely referring to a "Multi"-Racial who was of 
                            part-Black ancestry as "N" for "Negro" or "B" for 
                            "Black" ----- sometimes an "M" was placed on the 
                            census forms representing "Mulatto" ("Mixed-Race") 
                            and / or eventually a "C" was used for "Colored" (which, 
                            at that time was indicative of "Multi"-Racial lineage).

                            As a result of the application of Racist 'One Drop 
                            Rule'-based so-called "Racial-Integrity Laws", all 
                            of the "Multi"-Racials who were of any amount 
                            of part-Black ancestry were "legally- labeled" 
                            (and thus, misidentified) as being "Black" or "Negro" 
                            under the Racist of the concept of `Hypo-Descent'.  

                            In 1967, the US Supreme Court decision for 
                            Loving v. Virginia, ruled that the so-called 
                            "Racial-Integrity Laws" were Unconstitutional
                            –which thereby should also have resulted in 
                            the overturning the "legality" of the application 
                            of the Racist "One Drop /Hypo-descent Rule".

                            Even today, however, --- simply because so very many 
                            Multi-Generational Multi-Racially Mixed (MGM-Mixed) 
                            people have had parents and / or  grandparents who were 
                            "legally-misidentified" on previous Census Forms (and 
                            by Census-based Birth/School/Death Records, in the past) 
                            -- millions of people who are clearly of MGM-Mixed 
                            lineage are still finding themselves  continually 
                            misidentified as being of "mono"-racial lineage.

                            [[MGM-Mixed=Multi-Generational Multiracially Mixed]]

                            http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0056.html


                            Related Links: 

                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1421 

                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1418
                             

                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1417 

                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1386

                            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                            http://boards.mulatto.org/post/show_single_post?pid=35284580&postcount=4 

                            http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AjwuxYj8agKY7yGgqaJ7i.Xty6IX?qid=20070704121228AA7ZMsA&show=7#profile-info-ezQwEaJLaa 

                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3331 

                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/2885 


                            http://boards.mulatto.org/post/show_single_post?pid=34070161&postcount;=13 

                            http://mgmix.com/site/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=879:light-skin-curse-a-different-point-of-view&catid=36:biracial#comment-1271

                            http://boards.mulatto.org/post/show_single_post?pid=34070414&postcount;=14 

                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3344 

                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1399 

                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1747 


                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1402 

                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1400 

                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1570 

                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1573

                            .
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