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Spotlight on Josephine Bruce....

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  • TLBaker
    Spotlight on Josephine Bruce.... A concerned citizen, Josephine Bruce. October 29 Josephine Bruce Josephine Beall Willson Bruce was born on this date in 1853.
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 31, 2006
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      Spotlight on Josephine Bruce....

        

       

      A concerned citizen, Josephine Bruce.

       
       

       

      October 29

      Josephine Bruce

      Josephine Beall Willson Bruce was born on this date in 1853. She was an African-American teacher and social activist.

      From Philadelphia , Pennsylvania Willson was raised in Cleveland , Ohio , the daughter of a Dr. Joseph Willson who was a dentist and writer and Elizabeth Harnett Willson a talented musician. After graduating from Cleveland 's Central High School in 1871, and completing a teachers training course, Willson was the first "Colored" person to join the faculty of an integrated Cleveland elementary school. In 1878, she married Blanche K. Bruce, Senator from Mississippi .

      The couple moved to Washington D.C. and started a family together. While assisting in her husband political career moves and raising their only child, Bruce held a prominent place in the social life of Washington's African-American / Colored Elite and aided a number of ventures to promote the welfare of African-Americans. She was a strong advocate of industrial education for the colored masses as a way of overcoming obstacles in the path of racial progress. Following the death of her husband, Bruce became lady principal of Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute from 1899 to 1902. Upon leaving Tuskegee , Bruce moved to Josephine , Mississippi to manage her family's cotton plantations.

      She returned to Washington D.C. when her (Harvard-educated) son became assistant-superintendent in charge of the district's colored schools. An early leader and advocate of the club movement among Colored  women; she was a founder of the Booklovers' Club and the Colored Woman's League and the National Association of Colored Women (NACW). Josephine Bruce spent the last few months of her life in Kimball , West Virginia , where her son had become a school principal. At the age of seventy, she died on February 15, 1923.

       

       

      Best Regards,

      Lynne

       

    • multiracialbookclub
      Wow !! She was an amazing woman!!! In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com , TLBaker wrote: Spotlight on
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 31, 2006
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        Wow !! She was an amazing woman!!!

         In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
        "TLBaker" <tlbaker1@...> wrote:


        Spotlight on Josephine Bruce....

          

         

        A concerned citizen, Josephine Bruce.

         
         

         

        October 29


        Josephine Bruce

        Josephine Beall Willson Bruce was born on this date in 1853. She was an African-American teacher and social activist.

        From Philadelphia , Pennsylvania Willson was raised in Cleveland , Ohio , the daughter of a Dr. Joseph Willson who was a dentist and writer and Elizabeth Harnett Willson a talented musician. After graduating from Cleveland 's Central High School in 1871, and completing a teachers training course, Willson was the first "
        Colored" person to join the faculty of an integrated Cleveland elementary school. In 1878, she married Blanche K. Bruce, Senator from Mississippi .

        The couple moved to Washington D.C. and started a family together. While assisting in her husband political career moves and raising their only child, Bruce held a prominent place in the social life of Washington 's
        African-American / Colored Elite and aided a number of ventures to promote the welfare of African-Americans. She was a strong advocate of industrial education for the colored masses as a way of overcoming obstacles in the path of racial progress. Following the death of her husband, Bruce became lady principal of Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute from 1899 to 1902. Upon leaving Tuskegee , Bruce moved to Josephine , Mississippi to manage her family's cotton plantations.

        She returned to Washington D.C. when her (Harvard-educated) son became assistant-superintendent in charge of the district's 
        colored schools. An early leader and advocate of the club movement among Colored  women; she was a founder of the Booklovers' Club and the Colored Woman's League and the National Association of Colored Women (NACW). Josephine Bruce spent the last few months of her life in Kimball , West Virginia , where her son had become a school principal. At the age of seventy, she died on February 15, 1923.

        Best Regards, 

        Lynne




      • tlbaker1
        As you can probably tell, I just love these black history emails....... It s funny, most of these great people (well mostly all) are Mixed-Race people which
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 31, 2006
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          As you can probably tell, I just love
          these "black" history emails.......

          It's funny, most of these great people (well mostly all)
          are Mixed-Race people which is why I send them here.

           

          Lynne

           


          From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com]
          On Behalf Of
          multiracialbookclub
          Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2006 1:49 PM
          To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Generation-Mixed] Re: Spotlight on Josephine Bruce....

           

          Wow !! She was an amazing woman!!!

           In Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com,
          "TLBaker" <tlbaker1@...> wrote:

          Spotlight on Josephine Bruce....

            

           

          A concerned citizen, Josephine Bruce.

           
           

           

          October 29


          Josephine Bruce

          Josephine Beall Willson Bruce was born on this date in 1853. She was an African-American teacher and social activist.

          From Philadelphia , Pennsylvania Willson was raised in Cleveland , Ohio , the daughter of a Dr. Joseph Willson who was a dentist and writer and Elizabeth Harnett Willson a talented musician. After graduating from Cleveland 's Central High School in 1871, and completing a teachers training course, Willson was the first "Colored" person to join the faculty of an integrated Cleveland elementary school. In 1878, she married Blanche K. Bruce, Senator from Mississippi .

          The couple moved to Washington D.C. and started a family together. While assisting in her husband political career moves and raising their only child, Bruce held a prominent place in the social life of Washington 's African-American / Colored Elite and aided a number of ventures to promote the welfare of African-Americans. She was a strong advocate of industrial education for the colored masses as a way of overcoming obstacles in the path of racial progress. Following the death of her husband, Bruce became lady principal of Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute from 1899 to 1902. Upon leaving Tuskegee , Bruce moved to Josephine , Mississippi to manage her family's cotton plantations.

          She returned to Washington D.C. when her (Harvard-educated) son became assistant-superinte ndent in charge of the district's colored schools. An early leader and advocate of the club movement among Colored  women; she was a founder of the Booklovers' Club and the Colored Woman's League and the National Association of Colored Women (NACW). Josephine Bruce spent the last few months of her life in Kimball , West Virginia , where her son had become a school principal. At the age of seventy, she died on February 15, 1923.

          Best Regards, 

          Lynne



        • multiracialbookclub
          Agreed! In fact, they really seem to reiterate and support the data provided in the following links: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/991
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 31, 2006
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            Agreed! In fact, they really seem to reiterate and
            support the data provided in the following links:

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/991

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1399

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1400



             In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
            "tlbaker1" <tlbaker1@...> wrote:

            As you can probably tell, I just love
            these "black" history emails.......

            It's funny, most of these great people (well mostly all)
            are Mixed-Race people which is why I send them here.

            Lynne


            From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com]
            On Behalf Of
            multiracialbookclub
            Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2006 1:49 PM
            To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Generation-Mixed] Re: Spotlight on Josephine Bruce....

            Wow !! She was an amazing woman!!!

             In Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com,
            "TLBaker" <tlbaker1@...> wrote:

            Spotlight on Josephine Bruce....

              

            A concerned citizen, Josephine Bruce.

             
             

            October 29


            Josephine Bruce

            Josephine Beall Willson Bruce was born on this date in 1853. She was an African-American teacher and social activist.

            From Philadelphia , Pennsylvania Willson was raised in Cleveland , Ohio , the daughter of a Dr. Joseph Willson who was a dentist and writer and Elizabeth Harnett Willson a talented musician. After graduating from Cleveland 's Central High School in 1871, and completing a teachers training course, Willson was the first "Colored" person to join the faculty of an integrated Cleveland elementary school. In 1878, she married Blanche K. Bruce, Senator from Mississippi .

            The couple moved to Washington D.C. and started a family together. While assisting in her husband political career moves and raising their only child, Bruce held a prominent place in the social life of Washington 's African-American / Colored Elite and aided a number of ventures to promote the welfare of African-Americans. She was a strong advocate of industrial education for the colored masses as a way of overcoming obstacles in the path of racial progress. Following the death of her husband, Bruce became lady principal of Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute from 1899 to 1902. Upon leaving Tuskegee , Bruce moved to Josephine , Mississippi to manage her family's cotton plantations.

            She returned to Washington D.C. when her (Harvard-educated) son became assistant-superinte ndent in charge of the district's colored schools. An early leader and advocate of the club movement among Colored  women; she was a founder of the Booklovers' Club and the Colored Woman's League and the National Association of Colored Women (NACW). Josephine Bruce spent the last few months of her life in Kimball , West Virginia , where her son had become a school principal. At the age of seventy, she died on February 15, 1923.

            Best Regards, 

            Lynne

          • multiracialbookclub
            Spotlight on Josephine Bruce.... A concerned citizen, Josephine Bruce. Josephine Bruce Josephine Beall Willson Bruce was born October 29, 1853. She was a
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 14, 2008
            • 0 Attachment

              Spotlight on Josephine Bruce....

                

              A concerned citizen, Josephine Bruce.

               
               


              Josephine Bruce

              Josephine Beall Willson Bruce was born October 29, 1853.

              She was a racially-admixed woman of the
              African-American
              Ethnicity who also worked as a teacher and social activist.

              From Philadelphia , Pennsylvania Willson was raised
              in Cleveland , Ohio , the daughter of a Dr. Joseph
              Willson who was a dentist and writer and
              Elizabeth Harnett Willson a talented musician.
              After graduating from Cleveland 's Central High
              School in 1871, and completing a teachers training
              course, Willson was the first "
              Colored" person to join
              the faculty of an integrated Cleveland elementary school.

              In 1878, she married Blanche K. Bruce, Senator from Mississippi .

              The couple moved to Washington D.C. and started a family together.
              While assisting in her husband political career moves and raising their
              only child, Bruce held a prominent place in the social life of Washington 's
              African-American / Colored Elite and aided a number of ventures to promote the
              welfare of
              African-Americans. She was a strong advocate of industrial education for
              the
              colored masses as a way of overcoming obstacles in the path of racial progress.

              Following the death of her husband, Bruce became lady principal
              of Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute from 1899 to 1902.

              Upon leaving Tuskegee , Bruce moved to Josephine ,
              Mississippi to manage her family's cotton plantations.

              She returned to Washington D.C. when her (Harvard-educated) son became
              assistant-superinte ndent in charge of the district's 
              colored schools.

              An early leader and advocate of the club movement among 
              Colored  women;
              she was a founder of the Booklovers' Club and the
              Colored Woman's
              League and the National Association of
              Colored Women (NACW).

              Josephine Bruce spent the last few months of her life in Kimball ,
              West Virginia , where her son had become a school principal.

              At the age of seventy, she died on February 15, 1923.

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