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  • moltenlava_cat
    I m quite relieved to finally find a group such as this one. I m a young college student, with an interest in languages and other cultures. Growing up this,
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 28, 2006
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      I'm quite relieved to finally find a group such as this one.

      I'm a young college student, with an interest in languages
      and other cultures. Growing up this, Being Multi-Racial
      concept, was virtually unheard of in the schools I attended.
      Or people, majority authority figures, had the tendency
      to not believe me (or in other cases, tell me not to fabricate
      my ancestral origin)! An unfortunate side effect of growing
      up American, how often does this occur elsewhere?

      My mother's side is of African, Chinese, Native American and
      European. While my father's side is less clear. I know there
      were African, Native American and European people, but not much
      else (though I'm starting to wonder, taking into consideration,
      my uncles, older siblings and cousins). My father passed away
      this year and I'm not very close to his side of the family.

      Although on one standardized test(the ACT), and
      the 2000 census, I was able to select Multi-Racial.
      As a child I called myself Brown (even though
      I later found out this was a ‘classification’
      for other people) I still continue to use it.

      Yet I still wonder if I'm supposed to just
      consider myself (the way I'm been told, and
      at times, forced) ‘African-American’ or “black”.
    • j s
      Yet I still wonder if I m supposed to just consider myself (the way I m been told, and at times, forced) ‘African-American’ or “black”. Only call
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 28, 2006
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        "Yet I still wonder if I'm supposed to just
        consider myself (the way I'm been told, and
        at times, forced) ‘African-American’ or “black”. color
         


        Only call yourself that if it's how you truly feel.
        If you don't "feel" that way and can be objective with
        yourself that it's genuine, and not a discomfort with
        being "black", etc then I suggest you start to explore
        your components and see what intuitively seems to be
        most compatable with your temperment and personality.

        Some who have known you for a while, including family,
        may be condescending or hostile to you about this
        so you may want to keep it to yourself or only
        share it with those who are the most open-minded.
        When we are starting on a new path it is easy to get
        sidetracked by the negativity and ignorance of others.
         
        And I'm sure you'll find some support in this group too ;)
         
        BTW welcome aboard!! color

        Jeff   face

      • multiracialbookclub
        Hi MLC, Welcome to `Gen-Mixed !! [:)] We are so glad to have you here and to see that you ve become a part of our online community. [=D ] Your family history
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 28, 2006
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          Hi MLC,

          Welcome to `Gen-Mixed'!!  :)

          We are so glad to have you here and to see that
          you've become a part of our online community.=D>

          Your family history – as well as your personal experience
          – sounds very interesting and, I think I speak on behalf
          of everyone here when I say – we are definitely looking
          forward to your posts and to hearing more from you.;;)

          Listed below are some links to discussion topics (and
          other posts) that you might find to be of interest.:-?

          Welcome again and have a great day!!

          --M


          On Being Mixed-Race
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1488
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1487
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1400
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1399

          On Mixed Race Lineage
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/991
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1239
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1510

          On The Racist ODR
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1418
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1417
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1419

          On Government Manipulation of so-called "Race"
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1385
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1386
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1420  

          Info on a few Mixed-Race Celebrities:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1241

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1230
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1231
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1278
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1288
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1387
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1394
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1465
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1192

          In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
          "moltenlava_cat" <moltenlava_cat@...> wrote:


          I'm quite relieved to finally find a group such as this one.

          I'm a young college student, with an interest in languages
          and other cultures. Growing up this, Being Multi-Racial
          concept, was virtually unheard of in the schools I attended.
          Or people, majority authority figures, had the tendency
          to not believe me (or in other cases, tell me not to fabricate
          my ancestral origin)! An unfortunate side effect of growing
          up American, how often does this occur elsewhere?

          My mother's side is of African, Chinese, Native American and
          European. While my father's side is less clear. I know there
          were African, Native American and European people, but not much
          else (though I'm starting to wonder, taking into consideration,
          my uncles, older siblings and cousins). My father passed away
          this year and I'm not very close to his side of the family.

          Although on one standardized test(the ACT), and
          the 2000 census, I was able to select Multi-Racial.
          As a child I called myself Brown (even though
          I later found out this was a `classification'
          for other people) I still continue to use it.

          Yet I still wonder if I'm supposed to just
          consider myself (the way I'm been told, and
          at times, forced) `African-American' or "black".

        • tlbaker1
          Welcome, New Member ... I cannot see your name in this post!! A person of African descent … as well as European and Native descent … is the most accurate /
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 28, 2006
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            Welcome, New Member ... I cannot see your name in this post!!

            A person of African descent ... as well as European
            and Native descent ... is the most accurate / comfortable
            description of myself (or �black� if I want to
            give people the short 'non of your business /
            I don't feel like discussing it answer', LOLOL).

            A rose is still a rose...', blah, blah,
            blah, I know who I am, etc., LOL.

            [The Ethnic term] African American [AA], sounds
            too Ellis Island-like (in other words, African
            immigrants happily migrating to the US back in
            the 17th century, NOT [no Ellis island back then
            but you know what I mean]) and unrealistic to me.
            Also, the term "African descent" seems more broad to
            possibly include other ethnicities in the conversation.
            [The Ethnic term] African American [AA], seems too
            politically correct, too new for me still (when did
            the term come out, was it w/in the last 10-15 years?).

            I have a video by Dr. Henry Louis Gates
            titled 'Wonders of the African World'.
            One of the points that he talked about
            (paraphrased of course) is that some people are
            running around saying they are Nubian, African,
            making Nubian hair products, Nubian named
            businesses, buying up Kinte (derived from the
            Ashante's whom sold slaves to the US) cloth, etc., and
            they really don't have a clue what it really means to be
            Nubian or anything about Nubian / African culture.
            I know very little about the culture history myself.
            He also mentioned that the next term for
            AA's could be �neo-Nubian (circa 2020?)�.

            So in a nutshell, for me [the Ethnic term]
            African-American [AA] implies that I one
            has recently migrated to the US from
            Africa which is not the case for me and I
            don't feel that strong a connection to Africa.
            Only when I am at an African drumming
            event, LOLOL, I love those - the
            conjuring of the ancestors again...

             

            Lynne

             


            From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com ]
            On Behalf Of
            j s
            Sent: Saturday, October 28, 2006 2:13 PM
            To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Generation-Mixed] Re: Hello, New Member

             


            "Yet I still wonder if I'm supposed to just
            consider myself (the way I'm been told, and
            at times, forced) ‘African-American’ or “black”.

             



            Only call yourself that if it's how you truly feel.
            If you don't "feel" that way and can be objective with
            yourself that it's genuine, and not a discomfort with
            being "black", etc then I suggest you start to explore
            your components and see what intuitively seems to be
            most compatable with your temperment and personality.

            Some who have known you for a while, including family,
            may be condescending or hostile to you about this
            so you may want to keep it to yourself or only
            share it with those who are the most open-minded.
            When we are starting on a new path it is easy to get
            sidetracked by the negativity and ignorance of others.

             

            And I'm sure you'll find some support in this group too ;)

             

            BTW welcome aboard!!

             

            Jeff  


          • tlbaker1
            OK, here you are, welcome Moltenlava! I m a young college student, with an interest in languages and other cultures. Growing up this, Being Multi-Racial
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 28, 2006
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              OK, here you are, welcome Moltenlava!

               

              I'm a young college student, with an interest in languages
              and other cultures. Growing up this, Being Multi-Racial
              concept, was virtually unheard of in the schools I attended.
              Or people, majority authority figures, had the tendency
              to not believe me (or in other cases, tell me not to fabricate
              my ancestral origin)! An unfortunate side effect of growing
              up American, how often does this occur elsewhere?

              WOW, that is amazing, how can someone tell you
              that you are lying about your ancestry and you
              are YOUNG and in 2006 experiencing this!!
              I would expect this to happen to an 'old lady'
              like me, LOLOL, growing up as a child in
              the early to mid 70's. Guess I am naive.
              You are who you are if they don't
              believe you it is not your problem.

               

              You've come to the right place, welcome again!

               

              Lynne

               


              From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com ]
              On Behalf Of
              moltenlava_cat
              Sent: Saturday, October 28, 2006 1:07 PM
              To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Generation-Mixed] Hello, New Member

               

              I'm quite relieved to finally find a group such as this one.

              I'm a young college student, with an interest in languages
              and other cultures. Growing up this, Being Multi-Racial
              concept, was virtually unheard of in the schools I attended.
              Or people, majority authority figures, had the tendency
              to not believe me (or in other cases, tell me not to fabricate
              my ancestral origin)! An unfortunate side effect of growing
              up American, how often does this occur elsewhere?

              My mother's side is of African, Chinese, Native American and
              European. While my father's side is less clear. I know there
              were African, Native American and European people, but not much
              else (though I'm starting to wonder, taking into consideration,
              my uncles, older siblings and cousins). My father passed away
              this year and I'm not very close to his side of the family.

              Although on one standardized test(the ACT), and
              the 2000 census, I was able to select Multi-Racial.
              As a child I called myself Brown (even though
              I later found out this was a ‘classification’
              for other people) I still continue to use it.

              Yet I still wonder if I'm supposed to just
              consider myself (the way I'm been told, and
              at times, forced) ‘African-American’ or “black”.

            • moltenlava_cat
              Well I ve actually put some thought into this (although it may not seem that way). But I ve decided to just stick with what I know. I won t use either term.
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 2, 2006
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                Well I've actually put some thought into
                this (although it may not seem that way).
                But I've decided to just stick with what I know.
                I won't use either term.
                African-American isn't true,
                I was born in the US, and last time
                I checked my skin is still brown.
                So I'll just call myself brown, I
                feel more comfortable with this term.
                But thank you for your advice, Jeff.
                ______________________________________________________________________

                "'"Yet I still wonder if I'm supposed to just
                consider myself (the way I'm been told, and
                at times, forced) `African-American' or "black".""



                Only call yourself that if it's how you truly feel.
                If you don't "feel" that way and can be objective with
                yourself that it's genuine, and not a discomfort with
                being "black", etc then I suggest you start to explore
                your components and see what intuitively seems to be
                most compatable with your temperment and personality.

                Some who have known you for a while, including family,
                may be condescending or hostile to you about this
                so you may want to keep it to yourself or only
                share it with those who are the most open-minded.
                When we are starting on a new path it is easy to get
                sidetracked by the negativity and ignorance of others.

                And I'm sure you'll find some support in this group too ;)

                BTW welcome aboard!!

                Jeff
              • moltenlava_cat
                I was suprised too, considering that particular incident was in high school, but yes. It usually happened because of my answers on the forms issued to students
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 2, 2006
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                  I was suprised too, considering that particular incident was in
                  high school, but yes. It usually happened because of my answers
                  on the forms issued to students for the standardized testing.
                  I can recall a time when, one of the women (who was in charge of
                  checking the validity of the forms) refused to believe me at first.
                  I stood my ground, and made sure she knew I wasn't joking.
                  Sad part is some of my teachers, were more accepting
                  of students like me, than the staff.

                  ______________________________________________________________________


                  OK, here you are, welcome Moltenlava!



                  I'm a young college student, with an interest in languages
                  and other cultures. Growing up this, Being Multi-Racial
                  concept, was virtually unheard of in the schools I attended.
                  Or people, majority authority figures, had the tendency
                  to not believe me (or in other cases, tell me not to fabricate
                  my ancestral origin)! An unfortunate side effect of growing
                  up American, how often does this occur elsewhere?



                  WOW, that is amazing, how can someone tell you
                  that you are lying about your ancestry and you
                  are YOUNG and in 2006 experiencing this!!
                  I would expect this to happen to an 'old lady'
                  like me, LOLOL, growing up as a child in
                  the early to mid 70's. Guess I am naive.
                  You are who you are if they don't
                  believe you it is not your problem.


                  You've come to the right place, welcome again!



                  Lynne
                • docilechicken24
                  I ve dealt with those issues some, since I recently found out basically my whole family knows about the multiple heritages (one or two flat out deny, but
                  Message 8 of 9 , Nov 2, 2006
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                    I've dealt with those issues some, since I recently found out
                    basically my whole family knows about the multiple heritages
                    (one or two flat out deny, but there's been genetic-testing
                    done so there's no question) yet I am the only 'person of color'
                    in my family still and I am disturbing the flow and the "peace"
                    -- by being real and acknowledging and embracing it.

                    For me it ain't about comfort so much though.
                    I don't know if I could really feel comfortable in any catgory.
                    For me it is making sure my identity doesn't unjustly step on
                    anyone's feet, cause my Afro-American identity does, step on
                    the feet of people close to me, it is polar opposite of white
                    -- their chosen 'identity' --so it makes them uncomfortable and
                    challenges previously held notions, perceptions, and stereotypes.

                    I guess I have given up on fitting in (even though deep
                    down I still want to) and have attempted to construct
                    an identity that challenges and confronts society,
                    an identity with social and political meaning.

                    There is no right way to handle these issues I believe though,
                    we each have slightly to very different specific circumstances,
                    and we each gotta make peace in our own way in a way where
                    we can cope the best and be happy and proud of who
                    we have chosen to be or who we identify with.

                    Dustin


                    In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
                    "moltenlava_cat" <moltenlava_cat@...>
                    wrote:


                    Well I've actually put some thought into
                    this (although it may not seem that way).
                    But I've decided to just stick with what I know.
                    I won't use either term.
                    African-American isn't true,
                    I was born in the US, and last time
                    I checked my skin is still brown.
                    So I'll just call myself brown, I
                    feel more comfortable with this term.
                    But thank you for your advice, Jeff.


                    _____________________________________________________________________



                    "'"Yet I still wonder if I'm supposed to just
                    consider myself (the way I'm been told, and
                    at times, forced) `African-American' or "black".""




                    Only call yourself that if it's how you truly feel.
                    If you don't "feel" that way and can be objective with
                    yourself that it's genuine, and not a discomfort with
                    being "black", etc then I suggest you start to explore
                    your components and see what intuitively seems to be
                    most compatable with your temperment and personality.

                    Some who have known you for a while, including family,
                    may be condescending or hostile to you about this
                    so you may want to keep it to yourself or only
                    share it with those who are the most open-minded.
                    When we are starting on a new path it is easy to get
                    sidetracked by the negativity and ignorance of others.

                    And I'm sure you'll find some support in this group too ;)

                    BTW welcome aboard!!

                    Jeff
                  • tlbaker1
                    Sad... ... From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of moltenlava_cat Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2006 1:06
                    Message 9 of 9 , Nov 2, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Sad...

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                      [mailto:Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com]
                      On Behalf Of moltenlava_cat
                      Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2006 1:06 PM
                      To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [Generation-Mixed] Re: Hello, New Member

                      I was suprised too, considering that particular incident was in
                      high school, but yes. It usually happened because of my answers
                      on the forms issued to students for the standardized testing.
                      I can recall a time when, one of the women (who was in charge of
                      checking the validity of the forms) refused to believe me at first.
                      I stood my ground, and made sure she knew I wasn't joking.
                      Sad part is some of my teachers, were more accepting
                      of students like me, than the staff.

                      ______________________________________________________________________


                      OK, here you are, welcome Moltenlava!



                      I'm a young college student, with an interest in languages
                      and other cultures. Growing up this, Being Multi-Racial
                      concept, was virtually unheard of in the schools I attended.
                      Or people, majority authority figures, had the tendency
                      to not believe me (or in other cases, tell me not to fabricate
                      my ancestral origin)! An unfortunate side effect of growing
                      up American, how often does this occur elsewhere?



                      WOW, that is amazing, how can someone tell you
                      that you are lying about your ancestry and you
                      are YOUNG and in 2006 experiencing this!!
                      I would expect this to happen to an 'old lady'
                      like me, LOLOL, growing up as a child in
                      the early to mid 70's. Guess I am naive.
                      You are who you are if they don't
                      believe you it is not your problem.


                      You've come to the right place, welcome again!



                      Lynne




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