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The 7 Habits of Highly Multi-Racial People

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  • multiracialbookclub
    The Seven Habits of Highly Multi-Racial People What causes some people whose parents are of two different races to identify themselves as [Multi-Racial] while
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 25, 2006
    • 0 Attachment

      The Seven Habits of
       
      Highly Multi-Racial People


      What causes some people whose parents are
      of two different races to identify themselves as
      [Multi-Racial] while others adopt a single-race identity?

      What causes me to call myself [Multi-Racial]
      ---- even though my two, olive-skinned,
      multiracial … parents [do not identify
      themselves by that same term]?

      Is there something wrong with Mixed-Race
      people who take on a single-race self-concept?

      Is there something wrong with
      Mixed-Race people who don't?

      I've come to the conclusion that there is no right or
      wrong answer when it comes to someone's self-identity.

      But I do think there are right and wrong `reasons' for
      the racial identity choices a person ultimately makes.

      It is one thing if someone of black and white ancestry
      labels himself as [Multi-Racial] because that identity is
      consistent with the uniqueness of his upbringing, family
      circumstances, social interactions, and blended culture.

      It is quite another thing to take on a [Multi-Racial]
      entity because an individual believes that `Black'
      [or some other mono-racial "race" grouping]
      is bad, negative, and inferior, and wants to
      disassociate from it by any means necessary.

      In other words, when saying "I'm [Multi-Racial],"
      are you being true to yourself and the life you've
      lived, or is there a contradiction between your
      day-to-day life experiences and the identity you claim?

      With most of the Multi-Racial people
      I know, there is no contradiction.

      Our lives simply do not add
      up to a single-"race" `identity'.

      So we say we are multiracial not just
      because we are "Multi-Racial by birth."
      After all, in this day and age, who isn't?

      Rather, we have taken on a Multi-Racial
      `Identity' because we are also
      "Multi-Racial through Life Experience".

      What are those life experiences?
      I'm glad you asked.

      Here now is my list of  …

      "The Seven Habits of

      Highly Multiracial People
      ":


      1. Undergoes racial interrogation

      Many of us are familiar with this.
      It is when people are unable to racially classify us based
      on our physical appearance, so they ask, "What are you?"

      2. Experiences [what's called] the
      `Chameleon-Effect' of being [Multi-Racial]

      [This] is when one's perceived "race" changes
      from place to place, from circumstance to
      circumstance, from individual to individual.
      We may be seen as [belonging to
      any variety of different groups].

      3. Encounters bewilderment or
      disbelief when sharing life stories


      Many people just don't get it.

      Not only do we experience "racial interrogation" and
      the "Chameleon-Effect," but when we try to share our
      stories with others, we are met with doubt and disbelief,
      as if we do not know the very experiences we've had.

      4. Attacked for a perceived lack of
      "racial" "allegiance" or "authenticity"

      Because we often live between two different
      socially defined worlds and embrace more than
      one culture, we are accused of "not being Black
      enough," or of "not being True to `our race'."

      5. Experiences a temporary
      "Racial"-`Identity' Crisis

      The key here is the word, "temporary."

      I don't know anyone who identifies as
      Multi-Racial who hasn't gone through some
      kind of "racial"-confusion or `identity'-crisis.

      With some people, it lasts ten minutes.

      With others, it lasts ten years.

      But it can be resolved into a unified-identity.

      6. Develops an Inter-Racial, Mixed-Race,
      Cross-Cultural ---- "Comfort-Zone"

      Given our experiences, we find we are most comfortable
      in "racially integrated, ethnically and culturally diverse
      settings", and with other Mixed-Race people.

      7. Adopts a "racial" `identity' --
      acknowledging multiple backgrounds

      Finally, we are able to put our
      blended-background into words.
      We call ourselves … "multiracial,"
      "blackanese," "hapa," etc. …

      Should anyone still be confused about why
      someone would label themselves "Multi-Racial,"
      or have questions about what is driving this trend,
      ------ feel free to refer them to `The Seven Habits'.

      -- Written by Elliot Lewis

      Elliot Lewis is a free-lance television news reporter in
      Washington, D.C. amd can be reachedby email at either

      enuffsed1@... and / or at FadeAuthor@... --
      and his web site is available at http://www.lewisfreelance.com.

    • tlbaker1
      It is one thing if someone of black and white ancestry labels himself as [Multi-Racial] because that identity is consistent with the uniqueness of his
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 26, 2006
      • 0 Attachment

        It is one thing if someone of black and white ancestry
        labels himself as [Multi-Racial] because that identity is
        consistent with the uniqueness of his upbringing, family
        circumstances, social interactions, and blended culture.

        It is quite another thing to take on a [Multi-Racial]
        entity because an individual believes that `Black'
        [or some other mono-racial "race" grouping]
        is bad, negative, and inferior, and wants to
        disassociate from it by any means necessary.

        I think this is where some people would have a problem w/
        one identifying as multi-racial as they assume the person
        simply just doesn't want to 'identify' with being "black"
        - in some instances this could be true for some people.
        I know in some circles I would get #$%@ for doing
        it or they would just ignore me like I am crazy.
        Then again people will tell me that they don't see
        me as a 'Black' person, usually white people will
        say that, not sure how take that sometimes.

         

        Lynne

         


        From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com ]
        On Behalf Of
        multiracialbookclub
        Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2006 12:24 AM
        To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: The 7 Habits of Highly Multi-Racial People

         

        The Seven Habits of
         
        Highly Multi-Racial People


        What causes some people whose parents are
        of two different races to identify themselves as
        [Multi-Racial] while others adopt a single-race identity?

        What causes me to call myself [Multi-Racial]
        ---- even though my two, olive-skinned,
        multiracial … parents [do not identify
        themselves by that same term]?

        Is there something wrong with Mixed-Race
        people who take on a single-race self-concept?

        Is there something wrong with
        Mixed-Race people who don't?

        I've come to the conclusion that there is no right or
        wrong answer when it comes to someone's self-identity.

        But I do think there are right and wrong `reasons' for
        the racial identity choices a person ultimately makes.

        It is one thing if someone of black and white ancestry
        labels himself as [Multi-Racial] because that identity is
        consistent with the uniqueness of his upbringing, family
        circumstances, social interactions, and blended culture.

        It is quite another thing to take on a [Multi-Racial]
        entity because an individual believes that `Black'
        [or some other mono-racial "race" grouping]
        is bad, negative, and inferior, and wants to
        disassociate from it by any means necessary.

        In other words, when saying "I'm [Multi-Racial] ,"
        are you being true to yourself and the life you've
        lived, or is there a contradiction between your
        day-to-day life experiences and the identity you claim?

        With most of the Multi-Racial people
        I know, there is no contradiction.

        Our lives simply do not add
        up to a single-"race" `identity'.

        So we say we are multiracial not just
        because we are "Multi-Racial by birth."
        After all, in this day and age, who isn't?

        Rather, we have taken on a Multi-Racial
        `Identity' because we are also
        "Multi-Racial through Life Experience".

        What are those life experiences?
        I'm glad you asked.

        Here now is my list of  …

        "The Seven Habits of

        Highly Multiracial People":

        1. Undergoes racial interrogation

        Many of us are familiar with this.
        It is when people are unable to racially classify us based
        on our physical appearance, so they ask, "What are you?"

        2. Experiences [what's called] the
        `Chameleon-Effect' of being [Multi-Racial]

        [This] is when one's perceived "race" changes
        from place to place, from circumstance to
        circumstance, from individual to individual.
        We may be seen as [belonging to
        any variety of different groups].

        3. Encounters bewilderment or
        disbelief when sharing life stories


        Many people just don't get it.

        Not only do we experience "racial interrogation" and
        the "Chameleon-Effect, " but when we try to share our
        stories with others, we are met with doubt and disbelief,
        as if we do not know the very experiences we've had.

        4. Attacked for a perceived lack of
        "racial" "allegiance" or "authenticity"

        Because we often live between two different
        socially defined worlds and embrace more than
        one culture, we are accused of "not being Black
        enough," or of "not being True to `our race'."

        5. Experiences a temporary
        "Racial"-`Identity' Crisis

        The key here is the word, "temporary."

        I don't know anyone who identifies as
        Multi-Racial who hasn't gone through some
        kind of "racial"-confusion or `identity'-crisis.

        With some people, it lasts ten minutes.

        With others, it lasts ten years.

        But it can be resolved into a unified-identity.

        6. Develops an Inter-Racial, Mixed-Race,
        Cross-Cultural ---- "Comfort-Zone"

        Given our experiences, we find we are most comfortable
        in "racially integrated, ethnically and culturally diverse
        settings", and with other Mixed-Race people.

        7. Adopts a "racial" `identity' --
        acknowledging multiple backgrounds

        Finally, we are able to put our
        blended-background into words.
        We call ourselves … "multiracial, "
        "blackanese, " "hapa," etc. …

        Should anyone still be confused about why
        someone would label themselves "Multi-Racial, "
        or have questions about what is driving this trend,
        ------ feel free to refer them to `The Seven Habits'.

        -- Written by Elliot Lewis

        Elliot Lewis is a free-lance television news reporter in
        Washington , D.C. amd can be reachedby email at either
        enuffsed1@aol. com and / or at FadeAuthor@aol. com --
        and his web site is available at http://www.lewisfre elance.com.

      • j s
        And here is where I occasionally butt heads ( or agree to disagree ;P) with people regarding the concept of being Mixed. To me, being Mixed, while perhaps a
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 26, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          And here is where I occasionally butt heads ( or agree to
          disagree ;P) with people regarding the concept of being Mixed.

          To me, being Mixed, while perhaps a biological fact,
          is really more of a social phenomenon. Meaning it
          is the fact that the Mixed person is perceived as
          "different" from the majority of society or its
          dominant groups that creates the awareness that
          they are "other". If an entire culture or society is
          ‘Mulatto’ “generationally”, like in Cape Verde
          for example, I no longer see them as Mixed
          because they have become ‘a homogenous group
          with a unifying culture’. True, ancestrally
          they came from diverse stock, but throughout
          generations of interbreeding they have
          become something that is basically similar
          and any differences are not remarkable
          nor the source of sociological conflict.

          This is where I get into fights with many Hispanics because
          I have known some that are quick to talk about how they
          are Mixed when it is convenient but culturally and in
          their sense of 'identity' they see themselves as Hispanic.
          They are not "singled out as different" in their own
          environment and they have a unifying cultural identity,
          language, beliefs etc. Whereas some physical differences
          might be remarkable to Americans because of our hang-ups
          with race and purity, to most Hispanics the difference
          in appearance is generally perceived the same way whites
          see a difference between blond and brown hair, or freckles.
          They aren't put in a position to choose where they fit
          in or constantly needing to validate who they are.

          And I will even use myself as an example. I see myself
          as Mixed because it was something I discovered at age
          15 and has shaped the past 25 years of my life - the way
          I saw the world, the things I read and the way I saw myself.
          Were I to have gone through this past 40 years seeing myself
          as a ‘White’ guy, having a White-guy-in-America's experience,
          and only found out a few weeks ago about the percentage
          of “black” and ‘Indian’ in me, I would think it silly to
          start telling everyone how all of a sudden I'm Mixed
          or ‘a person-of-color’, even if it is "technically"
          true, and adopting all sorts of behaviors, diction or
          affectations to validate it. And trust me, I've seen it.

          I will also add that, while I've known about the ‘Indian’
          for most of my life, and I have read and explored it,
          I felt no real connection to it nor does it feel like
          a part of me. I will state it factually when asked but
          could not, in good conscience, call myself an ‘Indian’.
          I'd feel like I was a fraud because I don't have the
          cultural-connection to it nor the emotional-attachment
          - it's simply not a part of my self image or identity.
          But being a passé-blanc, almost" Octoroon" - that is
          basically at the core of who I am. The African side
          I've always felt close to and aware of even when
          I didn't have tangible proof. Intuitively it was
          a part of me and shaped me as I matured.

          and blah blah blah ;)  
           
             
          tlbaker1 <tlbaker1@...> wrote:

          It is one thing if someone of black and white ancestry
          labels himself as [Multi-Racial] because that identity is
          consistent with the uniqueness of his upbringing, family
          circumstances, social interactions, and blended culture.

          It is quite another thing to take on a [Multi-Racial]
          entity because an individual believes that `Black'
          [or some other mono-racial "race" grouping]
          is bad, negative, and inferior, and wants to
          disassociate from it by any means necessary.

          I think this is where some people would have a problem w/
          one identifying as multi-racial as they assume the person
          simply just doesn't want to 'identify' with being "black"
          - in some instances this could be true for some people.
          I know in some circles I would get #$%@ for doing
          it or they would just ignore me like I am crazy.
          Then again people will tell me that they don't see
          me as a 'Black' person, usually white people will
          say that, not sure how take that sometimes.
          Lynne



          From: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
          [mailto: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com ]
          On Behalf Of
          multiracialbookclub
          Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2006 12:24 AM
          To: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
          Subject: The 7 Habits of Highly Multi-Racial People

          The Seven Habits of
           
          Highly Multi-Racial People


          What causes some people whose parents are
          of two different races to identify themselves as
          [Multi-Racial] while others adopt a single-race identity?

          What causes me to call myself [Multi-Racial]
          ---- even though my two, olive-skinned,
          multiracial … parents [do not identify
          themselves by that same term]?

          Is there something wrong with Mixed-Race
          people who take on a single-race self-concept?

          Is there something wrong with
          Mixed-Race people who don't?

          I've come to the conclusion that there is no right or
          wrong answer when it comes to someone's self-identity.

          But I do think there are right and wrong `reasons' for
          the racial identity choices a person ultimately makes.

          It is one thing if someone of black and white ancestry
          labels himself as [Multi-Racial] because that identity is
          consistent with the uniqueness of his upbringing, family
          circumstances, social interactions, and blended culture.

          It is quite another thing to take on a [Multi-Racial]
          entity because an individual believes that `Black'
          [or some other mono-racial "race" grouping]
          is bad, negative, and inferior, and wants to
          disassociate from it by any means necessary.

          In other words, when saying "I'm [Multi-Racial] ,"
          are you being true to yourself and the life you've
          lived, or is there a contradiction between your
          day-to-day life experiences and the identity you claim?

          With most of the Multi-Racial people
          I know, there is no contradiction.

          Our lives simply do not add
          up to a single-"race" `identity'.

          So we say we are multiracial not just
          because we are "Multi-Racial by birth."
          After all, in this day and age, who isn't?

          Rather, we have taken on a Multi-Racial
          `Identity' because we are also
          "Multi-Racial through Life Experience".

          What are those life experiences?
          I'm glad you asked.

          Here now is my list of  …

          "The Seven Habits of

          Highly Multiracial People":

          1. Undergoes racial interrogation

          Many of us are familiar with this.
          It is when people are unable to racially classify us based
          on our physical appearance, so they ask, "What are you?"

          2. Experiences [what's called] the
          `Chameleon-Effect' of being [Multi-Racial]

          [This] is when one's perceived "race" changes
          from place to place, from circumstance to
          circumstance, from individual to individual.
          We may be seen as [belonging to
          any variety of different groups].

          3. Encounters bewilderment or
          disbelief when sharing life stories


          Many people just don't get it.

          Not only do we experience "racial interrogation" and
          the "Chameleon-Effect, " but when we try to share our
          stories with others, we are met with doubt and disbelief,
          as if we do not know the very experiences we've had.

          4. Attacked for a perceived lack of
          "racial" "allegiance" or "authenticity"

          Because we often live between two different
          socially defined worlds and embrace more than
          one culture, we are accused of "not being Black
          enough," or of "not being True to `our race'."

          5. Experiences a temporary
          "Racial"-`Identity' Crisis

          The key here is the word, "temporary."

          I don't know anyone who identifies as
          Multi-Racial who hasn't gone through some
          kind of "racial"-confusion or `identity'-crisis.

          With some people, it lasts ten minutes.

          With others, it lasts ten years.

          But it can be resolved into a unified-identity.

          6. Develops an Inter-Racial, Mixed-Race,
          Cross-Cultural ---- "Comfort-Zone"

          Given our experiences, we find we are most comfortable
          in "racially integrated, ethnically and culturally diverse
          settings", and with other Mixed-Race people.

          7. Adopts a "racial" `identity' --
          acknowledging multiple backgrounds

          Finally, we are able to put our
          blended-background into words.
          We call ourselves … "multiracial, "
          "blackanese, " "hapa," etc. …

          Should anyone still be confused about why
          someone would label themselves "Multi-Racial, "
          or have questions about what is driving this trend,
          ------ feel free to refer them to `The Seven Habits'.
          -- Written by Elliot Lewis

          Elliot Lewis is a free-lance television news reporter in
          Washington , D.C. amd can be reachedby email at either
          enuffsed1@aol. com and / or at FadeAuthor@aol. com --
          and his web site is available at http://www.lewisfre elance.com.


          Do you Yahoo!?
          Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail.

        • tlbaker1
          I agree w/ you on the concept of being Mixed is more of a social phenomenon as it highly depends on where you live and your experiences with other people. So,
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 26, 2006
          • 0 Attachment

            I agree w/ you on the concept of being Mixed is more
            of a social phenomenon as it highly depends on where
            you live and your experiences with other people.
            So, I guess the Cape Verdian person "becomes"
            Mixed or Mulatto if they move to an area
            where they are seen as “different”.

            And I definitely agree w/your debates with the Hispanic
            people. If you were to mention to them that people are
            Mixed throughout the Caribbean and the Americas due
            to slavery, the indigenous people on the land, and
            people migrating from all over the world to those
            areas (especially if you mention Black or African)
            -- they become sort of indifferent / indignant.
            One Puerto Rican girl I know, will tell you she
            is part Irish, black, and native Puerto Rican.
            I tease her and say "we're sisters" as we are
            sort of made up of the same ethnicities
            -- just different cultures / language.

            I definitely identify with being “black”`
            I love the rich history and such; I relate
            to the Native American as well, spiritually’
            The white part of me, although some might say
            is a large part , LOLOLOL, not really as there
            is no specific culture involved that I know of, i.e.,
            Jewish, Italian, etc., they were just Americans in
            the south. Suppose I could become an Anglophile
            and study England in the latter 19th century
            when my gg grandmother lived - being facetious.

            We live in white society so I think that
            cultural exposure is covered for me, LOLOL.

            So I guess my way of being Multiracial / Multicultural
            is just being myself and following my interests
            ---- w/out pressure to conform to any
            “race” or society if I choose not to.

            From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com]
            On Behalf Of
            j s
            Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2006 4:21 PM
            To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: The 7 Habits of Highly Multi-Racial People

            And here is where I occasionally butt heads ( or agree to
            disagree ;P) with people regarding the concept of being Mixed.

            To me, being Mixed, while perhaps a biological fact,
            is really more of a social phenomenon. Meaning it
            is the fact that the Mixed person is perceived as
            "different" from the majority of society or its
            dominant groups that creates the awareness that
            they are "other". If an entire culture or society is
            ‘Mulatto’ “generationally” , like in Cape Verde
            for example, I no longer see them as Mixed
            because they have become ‘a homogenous group
            with a unifying culture’. True, ancestrally
            they came from diverse stock, but throughout
            generations of interbreeding they have
            become something that is basically similar
            and any differences are not remarkable
            nor the source of sociological conflict.

            This is where I get into fights with many Hispanics because
            I have known some that are quick to talk about how they
            are Mixed when it is convenient but culturally and in
            their sense of 'identity' they see themselves as Hispanic.
            They are not "singled out as different" in their own
            environment and they have a unifying cultural identity,
            language, beliefs etc. Whereas some physical differences
            might be remarkable to Americans because of our hang-ups
            with race and purity, to most Hispanics the difference
            in appearance is generally perceived the same way whites
            see a difference between blond and brown hair, or freckles.
            They aren't put in a position to choose where they fit
            in or constantly needing to validate who they are.

            And I will even use myself as an example. I see myself
            as Mixed because it was something I discovered at age
            15 and has shaped the past 25 years of my life - the way
            I saw the world, the things I read and the way I saw myself.
            Were I to have gone through this past 40 years seeing myself
            as a ‘White’ guy, having a White-guy-in- America's experience,
            and only found out a few weeks ago about the percentage
            of “black” and ‘Indian’ in me, I would think it silly to
            start telling everyone how all of a sudden I'm Mixed
            or ‘a person-of-color’ , even if it is "technically"
            true, and adopting all sorts of behaviors, diction or
            affectations to validate it. And trust me, I've seen it.

            I will also add that, while I've known about the ‘Indian’
            for most of my life, and I have read and explored it,
            I felt no real connection to it nor does it feel like
            a part of me. I will state it factually when asked but
            could not, in good conscience, call myself an ‘Indian’.
            I'd feel like I was a fraud because I don't have the
            cultural-connection to it nor the emotional-attachmen t
            - it's simply not a part of my self image or identity.
            But being a passé-blanc, almost" Octoroon" - that is
            basically at the core of who I am. The African side
            I've always felt close to and aware of even when
            I didn't have tangible proof. Intuitively it was
            a part of me and shaped me as I matured.

            and blah blah blah ;)  

               
            tlbaker1 <tlbaker1@gmail. com> wrote:

            It is one thing if someone of black and white ancestry
            labels himself as [Multi-Racial] because that identity is
            consistent with the uniqueness of his upbringing, family
            circumstances, social interactions, and blended culture.

            It is quite another thing to take on a [Multi-Racial]
            entity because an individual believes that `Black'
            [or some other mono-racial "race" grouping]
            is bad, negative, and inferior, and wants to
            disassociate from it by any means necessary.

            I think this is where some people would have a problem w/
            one identifying as multi-racial as they assume the person
            simply just doesn't want to 'identify' with being "black"
            - in some instances this could be true for some people.
            I know in some circles I would get #$%@ for doing
            it or they would just ignore me like I am crazy.
            Then again people will tell me that they don't see
            me as a 'Black' person, usually white people will
            say that, not sure how take that sometimes.

            Lynne



             

            From: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
            [mailto: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com ]
            On Behalf Of
            multiracialbookclub
            Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2006 12:24 AM
            To: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
            Subject: The 7 Habits of Highly Multi-Racial People

             

            The Seven Habits of
             
            Highly Multi-Racial People


            What causes some people whose parents are
            of two different races to identify themselves as
            [Multi-Racial] while others adopt a single-race identity?

            What causes me to call myself [Multi-Racial]
            ---- even though my two, olive-skinned,
            multiracial … parents [do not identify
            themselves by that same term]?

            Is there something wrong with Mixed-Race
            people who take on a single-race self-concept?

            Is there something wrong with
            Mixed-Race people who don't?

            I've come to the conclusion that there is no right or
            wrong answer when it comes to someone's self-identity.

            But I do think there are right and wrong `reasons' for
            the racial identity choices a person ultimately makes.

            It is one thing if someone of black and white ancestry
            labels himself as [Multi-Racial] because that identity is
            consistent with the uniqueness of his upbringing, family
            circumstances, social interactions, and blended culture.

            It is quite another thing to take on a [Multi-Racial]
            entity because an individual believes that `Black'
            [or some other mono-racial "race" grouping]
            is bad, negative, and inferior, and wants to
            disassociate from it by any means necessary.

            In other words, when saying "I'm [Multi-Racial] ,"
            are you being true to yourself and the life you've
            lived, or is there a contradiction between your
            day-to-day life experiences and the identity you claim?

            With most of the Multi-Racial people
            I know, there is no contradiction.

            Our lives simply do not add
            up to a single-"race" `identity'.

            So we say we are multiracial not just
            because we are "Multi-Racial by birth."
            After all, in this day and age, who isn't?

            Rather, we have taken on a Multi-Racial
            `Identity' because we are also
            "Multi-Racial through Life Experience".

            What are those life experiences?
            I'm glad you asked.

            Here now is my list of  …

            "The Seven Habits of

            Highly Multiracial People":

            1. Undergoes racial interrogation

            Many of us are familiar with this.
            It is when people are unable to racially classify us based
            on our physical appearance, so they ask, "What are you?"

            2. Experiences [what's called] the
            `Chameleon-Effect' of being [Multi-Racial]

            [This] is when one's perceived "race" changes
            from place to place, from circumstance to
            circumstance, from individual to individual.
            We may be seen as [belonging to
            any variety of different groups].

            3. Encounters bewilderment or
            disbelief when sharing life stories


            Many people just don't get it.

            Not only do we experience "racial interrogation" and
            the "Chameleon-Effect, " but when we try to share our
            stories with others, we are met with doubt and disbelief,
            as if we do not know the very experiences we've had.

            4. Attacked for a perceived lack of
            "racial" "allegiance" or "authenticity"

            Because we often live between two different
            socially defined worlds and embrace more than
            one culture, we are accused of "not being Black
            enough," or of "not being True to `our race'."

            5. Experiences a temporary
            "Racial"-`Identity' Crisis

            The key here is the word, "temporary."

            I don't know anyone who identifies as
            Multi-Racial who hasn't gone through some
            kind of "racial"-confusion or `identity'-crisis.

            With some people, it lasts ten minutes.

            With others, it lasts ten years.

            But it can be resolved into a unified-identity.

            6. Develops an Inter-Racial, Mixed-Race,
            Cross-Cultural ---- "Comfort-Zone"

            Given our experiences, we find we are most comfortable
            in "racially integrated, ethnically and culturally diverse
            settings", and with other Mixed-Race people.

            7. Adopts a "racial" `identity' --
            acknowledging multiple backgrounds

            Finally, we are able to put our
            blended-background into words.
            We call ourselves … "multiracial, "
            "blackanese, " "hapa," etc. …

            Should anyone still be confused about why
            someone would label themselves "Multi-Racial, "
            or have questions about what is driving this trend,
            ------ feel free to refer them to `The Seven Habits'.

            -- Written by Elliot Lewis

            Elliot Lewis is a free-lance television news reporter in
            Washington , D.C. amd can be reachedby email at either
            enuffsed1@aol. com and / or at FadeAuthor@aol. com --
            and his web site is available at http://www.lewisfre elance.com.

             

             


          • j s
            That s a good point. I guess at some point I was trying to dissect how to attend to my various portions and give proper time, if you will. But I realized
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 28, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              That's a good point. I guess at some point I was
              trying to dissect how to "attend" to my various
              portions and give proper time, if you will.
              But I realized that, in this society, unless one is in a
              predominantly “black” environment ( meaning for those of
              us of african descent ) then our day to day existence is
              pretty much a "white" one, from the minute we turn on the
              TV to the way we probably interact with our coworkers.

              But only by being in a truly "alien"
              environment can we really see it.

              Of course the other problem is, what has come to
              represent “black” mainstream culture is so coarse,
              unrefined and negative that those of us who are a
              bit educated and sophisticated just cringe and feel
              like there is nothing really there for us to embrace.

              I personally feel no connection to the current
              hiphop culture which has become the ’default
              “black” culture’ -- to the mainstream -- and have
              therefore taken my solace and inspiration from
              “blacks” who I can feel proud of and who truly
              represent my ideals ---- the people of The
              Harlem Renaissance and The Civil Rights Movement.

              A time when intelligence, education, grammar
              and deep thought were considered something of
              value in ‘the “black” community’, as opposed
              to the flashy materialism, superficiality and
              irresponsible sexual attitudes so in vogue today.

              tlbaker1 <tlbaker1@...> wrote:
              I agree w/ you on the concept of being Mixed is more
              of a social phenomenon as it highly depends on where
              you live and your experiences with other people.
              So, I guess the Cape Verdian person "becomes"
              Mixed or Mulatto if they move to an area
              where they are seen as “different”.

              And I definitely agree w/your debates with the Hispanic
              people. If you were to mention to them that people are
              Mixed throughout the Caribbean and the Americas due
              to slavery, the indigenous people on the land, and
              people migrating from all over the world to those
              areas (especially if you mention Black or African)
              -- they become sort of indifferent / indignant.
              One Puerto Rican girl I know, will tell you she
              is part Irish, black, and native Puerto Rican.
              I tease her and say "we're sisters" as we are
              sort of made up of the same ethnicities
              -- just different cultures / language.

              I definitely identify with being “black”`
              I love the rich history and such; I relate
              to the Native American as well, spiritually’
              The white part of me, although some might say
              is a large part , LOLOLOL, not really as there
              is no specific culture involved that I know of, i.e.,
              Jewish, Italian, etc., they were just Americans in
              the south. Suppose I could become an Anglophile
              and study England in the latter 19th century
              when my gg grandmother lived - being facetious.

              We live in white society so I think that
              cultural exposure is covered for me, LOLOL.

              So I guess my way of being Multiracial / Multicultural
              is just being myself and following my interests
              ---- w/out pressure to conform to any
              “race” or society if I choose not to.

              From: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
              [mailto:Generation- Mixed@yahoogroup s.com]
              On Behalf Of
              j s
              Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2006 4:21 PM
              To: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: RE: The 7 Habits of Highly Multi-Racial People


              And here is where I occasionally butt heads ( or agree to
              disagree ;P) with people regarding the concept of being Mixed.

              To me, being Mixed, while perhaps a biological fact,
              is really more of a social phenomenon. Meaning it
              is the fact that the Mixed person is perceived as
              "different" from the majority of society or its
              dominant groups that creates the awareness that
              they are "other". If an entire culture or society is
              ‘Mulatto’ “generationally” , like in Cape Verde
              for example, I no longer see them as Mixed
              because they have become ‘a homogenous group
              with a unifying culture’. True, ancestrally
              they came from diverse stock, but throughout
              generations of interbreeding they have
              become something that is basically similar
              and any differences are not remarkable
              nor the source of sociological conflict.

              This is where I get into fights with many Hispanics because
              I have known some that are quick to talk about how they
              are Mixed when it is convenient but culturally and in
              their sense of 'identity' they see themselves as Hispanic.
              They are not "singled out as different" in their own
              environment and they have a unifying cultural identity,
              language, beliefs etc. Whereas some physical differences
              might be remarkable to Americans because of our hang-ups
              with race and purity, to most Hispanics the difference
              in appearance is generally perceived the same way whites
              see a difference between blond and brown hair, or freckles.
              They aren't put in a position to choose where they fit
              in or constantly needing to validate who they are.

              And I will even use myself as an example. I see myself
              as Mixed because it was something I discovered at age
              15 and has shaped the past 25 years of my life - the way
              I saw the world, the things I read and the way I saw myself.
              Were I to have gone through this past 40 years seeing myself
              as a ‘White’ guy, having a White-guy-in- America's experience,
              and only found out a few weeks ago about the percentage
              of “black” and ‘Indian’ in me, I would think it silly to
              start telling everyone how all of a sudden I'm Mixed
              or ‘a person-of-color’ , even if it is "technically"
              true, and adopting all sorts of behaviors, diction or
              affectations to validate it. And trust me, I've seen it.

              I will also add that, while I've known about the ‘Indian’
              for most of my life, and I have read and explored it,
              I felt no real connection to it nor does it feel like
              a part of me. I will state it factually when asked but
              could not, in good conscience, call myself an ‘Indian’.
              I'd feel like I was a fraud because I don't have the
              cultural-connection to it nor the emotional-attachmen t
              - it's simply not a part of my self image or identity.
              But being a passé-blanc, almost" Octoroon" - that is
              basically at the core of who I am. The African side
              I've always felt close to and aware of even when
              I didn't have tangible proof. Intuitively it was
              a part of me and shaped me as I matured.

              and blah blah blah ;)  
                 
              tlbaker1 <tlbaker1@gmail. com> wrote:


              It is one thing if someone of black and white ancestry
              labels himself as [Multi-Racial] because that identity is
              consistent with the uniqueness of his upbringing, family
              circumstances, social interactions, and blended culture.

              It is quite another thing to take on a [Multi-Racial]
              entity because an individual believes that `Black'
              [or some other mono-racial "race" grouping]
              is bad, negative, and inferior, and wants to
              disassociate from it by any means necessary.

              I think this is where some people would have a problem w/
              one identifying as multi-racial as they assume the person
              simply just doesn't want to 'identify' with being "black"
              - in some instances this could be true for some people.
              I know in some circles I would get #$%@ for doing
              it or they would just ignore me like I am crazy.
              Then again people will tell me that they don't see
              me as a 'Black' person, usually white people will
              say that, not sure how take that sometimes.
              Lynne



              From: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
              [mailto: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com ]
              On Behalf Of
              multiracialbookclub
              Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2006 12:24 AM
              To: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: The 7 Habits of Highly Multi-Racial People


              The Seven Habits of

               
              Highly Multi-Racial People


              What causes some people whose parents are
              of two different races to identify themselves as
              [Multi-Racial] while others adopt a single-race identity?

              What causes me to call myself [Multi-Racial]
              ---- even though my two, olive-skinned,
              multiracial … parents [do not identify
              themselves by that same term]?

              Is there something wrong with Mixed-Race
              people who take on a single-race self-concept?

              Is there something wrong with
              Mixed-Race people who don't?

              I've come to the conclusion that there is no right or
              wrong answer when it comes to someone's self-identity.

              But I do think there are right and wrong `reasons' for
              the racial identity choices a person ultimately makes.

              It is one thing if someone of black and white ancestry
              labels himself as [Multi-Racial] because that identity is
              consistent with the uniqueness of his upbringing, family
              circumstances, social interactions, and blended culture.

              It is quite another thing to take on a [Multi-Racial]
              entity because an individual believes that `Black'
              [or some other mono-racial "race" grouping]
              is bad, negative, and inferior, and wants to
              disassociate from it by any means necessary.

              In other words, when saying "I'm [Multi-Racial] ,"
              are you being true to yourself and the life you've
              lived, or is there a contradiction between your
              day-to-day life experiences and the identity you claim?

              With most of the Multi-Racial people
              I know, there is no contradiction.

              Our lives simply do not add
              up to a single-"race" `identity'.

              So we say we are multiracial not just
              because we are "Multi-Racial by birth."
              After all, in this day and age, who isn't?

              Rather, we have taken on a Multi-Racial
              `Identity' because we are also
              "Multi-Racial through Life Experience".

              What are those life experiences?
              I'm glad you asked.

              Here now is my list of  …

              "The Seven Habits of

              Highly Multiracial People":

              1. Undergoes racial interrogation

              Many of us are familiar with this.
              It is when people are unable to racially classify us based
              on our physical appearance, so they ask, "What are you?"

              2. Experiences [what's called] the
              `Chameleon-Effect' of being [Multi-Racial]

              [This] is when one's perceived "race" changes
              from place to place, from circumstance to
              circumstance, from individual to individual.
              We may be seen as [belonging to
              any variety of different groups].

              3. Encounters bewilderment or
              disbelief when sharing life stories


              Many people just don't get it.

              Not only do we experience "racial interrogation" and
              the "Chameleon-Effect, " but when we try to share our
              stories with others, we are met with doubt and disbelief,
              as if we do not know the very experiences we've had.

              4. Attacked for a perceived lack of
              "racial" "allegiance" or "authenticity"

              Because we often live between two different
              socially defined worlds and embrace more than
              one culture, we are accused of "not being Black
              enough," or of "not being True to `our race'."

              5. Experiences a temporary
              "Racial"-`Identity' Crisis

              The key here is the word, "temporary."

              I don't know anyone who identifies as
              Multi-Racial who hasn't gone through some
              kind of "racial"-confusion or `identity'-crisis.

              With some people, it lasts ten minutes.

              With others, it lasts ten years.

              But it can be resolved into a unified-identity.

              6. Develops an Inter-Racial, Mixed-Race,
              Cross-Cultural ---- "Comfort-Zone"

              Given our experiences, we find we are most comfortable
              in "racially integrated, ethnically and culturally diverse
              settings", and with other Mixed-Race people.

              7. Adopts a "racial" `identity' --
              acknowledging multiple backgrounds

              Finally, we are able to put our
              blended-background into words.
              We call ourselves … "multiracial, "
              "blackanese, " "hapa," etc. …

              Should anyone still be confused about why
              someone would label themselves "Multi-Racial, "
              or have questions about what is driving this trend,
              ------ feel free to refer them to `The Seven Habits'.
              -- Written by Elliot Lewis

              Elliot Lewis is a free-lance television news reporter in
              Washington , D.C. amd can be reachedby email at either
              enuffsed1@aol. com and / or at FadeAuthor@aol. com --
              and his web site is available at http://www.lewisfre elance.com.
               



              Want to start your own business? Learn how on Yahoo! Small Business.

            • tlbaker1
              OMG, you took the words right out of my mouth!!! I am so angry and disappointed with this so called Black culture that we have nowadays. Our forefathers --
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 28, 2006
              • 0 Attachment

                OMG, you took the words right out of my mouth!!!
                I am so angry and disappointed with this
                "so-called" Black culture that we have nowadays.

                Our forefathers -- both white and black
                -- did not fight and die / be murdered
                for us live in this society like this.

                I become ecstatic when I am in the company
                of extremely positive and intelligent “black”/
                multiracial folk both online and in person, LOL.
                That's why I love the African-American
                History emails that I subscribe to so much.

                There was an AA person featured once who
                was the first “black” Harvard graduate in
                the either the 1700's or 1800's, imagine that,
                what courage and determination because as
                we all know the other students wanted
                him out of the school dead or alive.

                I am glad I don't have any children as
                it would be very difficult to keep
                them away from today’s Black culture.

                 

                Lynne

                 


                From: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                [mailto: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com ]
                On Behalf Of
                j s
                Sent: Saturday, October 28, 2006 12:23 PM
                To: Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: JS - RE: The 7 Habits of Highly Multi-Racial People

                 

                That's a good point. I guess at some point I was
                trying to dissect how to "attend" to my various
                portions and give proper time, if you will.
                But I realized that, in this society, unless one is in a
                predominantly “black” environment ( meaning for those of
                us of african descent ) then our day to day existence is
                pretty much a "white" one, from the minute we turn on the
                TV to the way we probably interact with our coworkers.

                But only by being in a truly "alien"
                environment can we really see it.

                Of course the other problem is, what has come to
                represent “black” mainstream culture is so coarse,
                unrefined and negative that those of us who are a
                bit educated and sophisticated just cringe and feel
                like there is nothing really there for us to embrace.

                I personally feel no connection to the current
                hiphop culture which has become the ’default
                “black” culture’ -- to the mainstream -- and have
                therefore taken my solace and inspiration from
                “blacks” who I can feel proud of and who truly
                represent my ideals ---- the people of The
                Harlem Renaissance and The Civil Rights Movement.

                A time when intelligence, education, grammar
                and deep thought were considered something of
                value in ‘the “black” community’, as opposed
                to the flashy materialism, superficiality and
                irresponsible sexual attitudes so in vogue today.

                tlbaker1 <tlbaker1@gmail. com> wrote:


                I agree w/ you on the concept of being Mixed is more
                of a social phenomenon as it highly depends on where
                you live and your experiences with other people.
                So, I guess the Cape Verdian person "becomes"
                Mixed or Mulatto if they move to an area
                where they are seen as “different”.

                And I definitely agree w/your debates with the Hispanic
                people. If you were to mention to them that people are
                Mixed throughout the Caribbean and the Americas due
                to slavery, the indigenous people on the land, and
                people migrating from all over the world to those
                areas (especially if you mention Black or African)
                -- they become sort of indifferent / indignant.
                One Puerto Rican girl I know, will tell you she
                is part Irish, black, and native Puerto Rican.
                I tease her and say "we're sisters" as we are
                sort of made up of the same ethnicities
                -- just different cultures / language.

                I definitely identify with being “black”`
                I love the rich history and such; I relate
                to the Native American as well, spiritually’
                The white part of me, although some might say
                is a large part , LOLOLOL, not really as there
                is no specific culture involved that I know of, i.e.,
                Jewish, Italian, etc., they were just Americans in
                the south. Suppose I could become an Anglophile
                and study England in the latter 19th century
                when my gg grandmother lived - being facetious.

                We live in white society so I think that
                cultural exposure is covered for me, LOLOL.

                So I guess my way of being Multiracial / Multicultural
                is just being myself and following my interests
                ---- w/out pressure to conform to any
                “race” or society if I choose not to.

                From: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
                [mailto: Generation- Mixed@yahoogroup s.com ]
                On Behalf Of
                j s
                Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2006 4:21 PM
                To: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: RE: The 7 Habits of Highly Multi-Racial People



                And here is where I occasionally butt heads ( or agree to
                disagree ;P) with people regarding the concept of being Mixed.

                To me, being Mixed, while perhaps a biological fact,
                is really more of a social phenomenon. Meaning it
                is the fact that the Mixed person is perceived as
                "different" from the majority of society or its
                dominant groups that creates the awareness that
                they are "other". If an entire culture or society is
                ‘Mulatto’ “generationally” , like in Cape Verde
                for example, I no longer see them as Mixed
                because they have become ‘a homogenous group
                with a unifying culture’. True, ancestrally
                they came from diverse stock, but throughout
                generations of interbreeding they have
                become something that is basically similar
                and any differences are not remarkable
                nor the source of sociological conflict.

                This is where I get into fights with many Hispanics because
                I have known some that are quick to talk about how they
                are Mixed when it is convenient but culturally and in
                their sense of 'identity' they see themselves as Hispanic.
                They are not "singled out as different" in their own
                environment and they have a unifying cultural identity,
                language, beliefs etc. Whereas some physical differences
                might be remarkable to Americans because of our hang-ups
                with race and purity, to most Hispanics the difference
                in appearance is generally perceived the same way whites
                see a difference between blond and brown hair, or freckles.
                They aren't put in a position to choose where they fit
                in or constantly needing to validate who they are.

                And I will even use myself as an example. I see myself
                as Mixed because it was something I discovered at age
                15 and has shaped the past 25 years of my life - the way
                I saw the world, the things I read and the way I saw myself.
                Were I to have gone through this past 40 years seeing myself
                as a ‘White’ guy, having a White-guy-in- America's experience,
                and only found out a few weeks ago about the percentage
                of “black” and ‘Indian’ in me, I would think it silly to
                start telling everyone how all of a sudden I'm Mixed
                or ‘a person-of-color’ , even if it is "technically"
                true, and adopting all sorts of behaviors, diction or
                affectations to validate it. And trust me, I've seen it.

                I will also add that, while I've known about the ‘Indian’
                for most of my life, and I have read and explored it,
                I felt no real connection to it nor does it feel like
                a part of me. I will state it factually when asked but
                could not, in good conscience, call myself an ‘Indian’.
                I'd feel like I was a fraud because I don't have the
                cultural-connection to it nor the emotional-attachmen t
                - it's simply not a part of my self image or identity.
                But being a passé-blanc, almost" Octoroon" - that is
                basically at the core of who I am. The African side
                I've always felt close to and aware of even when
                I didn't have tangible proof. Intuitively it was
                a part of me and shaped me as I matured.

                and blah blah blah ;)  

                   
                tlbaker1 <tlbaker1@gmail. com> wrote:



                It is one thing if someone of black and white ancestry
                labels himself as [Multi-Racial] because that identity is
                consistent with the uniqueness of his upbringing, family
                circumstances, social interactions, and blended culture.

                It is quite another thing to take on a [Multi-Racial]
                entity because an individual believes that `Black'
                [or some other mono-racial "race" grouping]
                is bad, negative, and inferior, and wants to
                disassociate from it by any means necessary.

                I think this is where some people would have a problem w/
                one identifying as multi-racial as they assume the person
                simply just doesn't want to 'identify' with being "black"
                - in some instances this could be true for some people.
                I know in some circles I would get #$%@ for doing
                it or they would just ignore me like I am crazy.
                Then again people will tell me that they don't see
                me as a 'Black' person, usually white people will
                say that, not sure how take that sometimes.

                Lynne




                From: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
                [mailto: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com ]
                On Behalf Of
                multiracialbookclub
                Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2006 12:24 AM
                To: Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: The 7 Habits of Highly Multi-Racial People



                The Seven Habits of
                 
                Highly Multi-Racial People


                What causes some people whose parents are
                of two different races to identify themselves as
                [Multi-Racial] while others adopt a single-race identity?

                What causes me to call myself [Multi-Racial]
                ---- even though my two, olive-skinned,
                multiracial … parents [do not identify
                themselves by that same term]?

                Is there something wrong with Mixed-Race
                people who take on a single-race self-concept?

                Is there something wrong with
                Mixed-Race people who don't?

                I've come to the conclusion that there is no right or
                wrong answer when it comes to someone's self-identity.

                But I do think there are right and wrong `reasons' for
                the racial identity choices a person ultimately makes.

                It is one thing if someone of black and white ancestry
                labels himself as [Multi-Racial] because that identity is
                consistent with the uniqueness of his upbringing, family
                circumstances, social interactions, and blended culture.

                It is quite another thing to take on a [Multi-Racial]
                entity because an individual believes that `Black'
                [or some other mono-racial "race" grouping]
                is bad, negative, and inferior, and wants to
                disassociate from it by any means necessary.

                In other words, when saying "I'm [Multi-Racial] ,"
                are you being true to yourself and the life you've
                lived, or is there a contradiction between your
                day-to-day life experiences and the identity you claim?

                With most of the Multi-Racial people
                I know, there is no contradiction.

                Our lives simply do not add
                up to a single-"race" `identity'.

                So we say we are multiracial not just
                because we are "Multi-Racial by birth."
                After all, in this day and age, who isn't?

                Rather, we have taken on a Multi-Racial
                `Identity' because we are also
                "Multi-Racial through Life Experience".

                What are those life experiences?
                I'm glad you asked.

                Here now is my list of  …

                "The Seven Habits of

                Highly Multiracial People":

                1. Undergoes racial interrogation

                Many of us are familiar with this.
                It is when people are unable to racially classify us based
                on our physical appearance, so they ask, "What are you?"

                2. Experiences [what's called] the
                `Chameleon-Effect' of being [Multi-Racial]

                [This] is when one's perceived "race" changes
                from place to place, from circumstance to
                circumstance, from individual to individual.
                We may be seen as [belonging to
                any variety of different groups].

                3. Encounters bewilderment or
                disbelief when sharing life stories


                Many people just don't get it.

                Not only do we experience "racial interrogation" and
                the "Chameleon-Effect, " but when we try to share our
                stories with others, we are met with doubt and disbelief,
                as if we do not know the very experiences we've had.

                4. Attacked for a perceived lack of
                "racial" "allegiance" or "authenticity"

                Because we often live between two different
                socially defined worlds and embrace more than
                one culture, we are accused of "not being Black
                enough," or of "not being True to `our race'."

                5. Experiences a temporary
                "Racial"-`Identity' Crisis

                The key here is the word, "temporary."

                I don't know anyone who identifies as
                Multi-Racial who hasn't gone through some
                kind of "racial"-confusion or `identity'-crisis.

                With some people, it lasts ten minutes.

                With others, it lasts ten years.

                But it can be resolved into a unified-identity.

                6. Develops an Inter-Racial, Mixed-Race,
                Cross-Cultural ---- "Comfort-Zone"

                Given our experiences, we find we are most comfortable
                in "racially integrated, ethnically and culturally diverse
                settings", and with other Mixed-Race people.

                7. Adopts a "racial" `identity' --
                acknowledging multiple backgrounds

                Finally, we are able to put our
                blended-background into words.
                We call ourselves … "multiracial, "
                "blackanese, " "hapa," etc. …

                Should anyone still be confused about why
                someone would label themselves "Multi-Racial, "
                or have questions about what is driving this trend,
                ------ feel free to refer them to `The Seven Habits'.

                -- Written by Elliot Lewis

                Elliot Lewis is a free-lance television news reporter in
                Washington , D.C. amd can be reachedby email at either
                enuffsed1@aol. com and / or at FadeAuthor@aol. com --
                and his web site is available at http://www.lewisfre elance.com.

                 


                 

                 


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