Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [Generation-Mixed] Re: proposed comic book - "History of the Mulatto"

Expand Messages
  • j s
    Thanks for your comments. One of the areas I plan to address is the almost forced choice many mixed people made in the 60 s and 70 s to become black ,
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 26, 2006
      Thanks for your comments.
       
        One of the areas I plan to address is the almost "forced" choice many
      mixed people made in the 60's and 70's to become "black", either
      through a sense of obligation to the cause or pressure from their peers. 
       
        I will do an overview and see how much content I can fit in a 60 page book.
      If it appears that the content excees the space then I will keep it
      general and make second and third volumes focusing on specifics. 
      One of my biggest challenges will be how to utilize graphics
      since it won't be an actual plot driven story but more of an
      historical overview with pictures to accompany and emphasize.

      multiracialbookclub <soaptalk@...> wrote:
      Hi Jeff,

      Wow!!  This is great news and it is so good to hear how you
      are / have been coming so far along with the comic series that
      you are creating –– as well as to hear about all the areas of
      Mulatto-based history that you are planning to include in it.
      J

      It looks to me like you most certainly have covered /
      are covering all the major topical areas – and -- what
      may be particularly intriguing for many readers –
      I think – will be their discovery (through your comic
      book) of how so many successful historical events
      and movements (such as 'The Harlem Renaissance'
      and 'The American Civil Rights Movement'; etc.) were
      largely led by those who were of a Mulatto lineage.

      Even fewer people seem to realize that (
      as sad as it
      is to have to say
      ) even the rather divisive (and racist,
      'one-drop rule' embracing
      ) `Black-Power' movement
      (
      which was revived in the late 1960's / early 1970's and
      openly exploited by the American / Western media and
      political system to try to usurp and replace the earlier
      and extremely successful  'Civil Rights Movement'
      )
      was also largely led by people who quite openly and
      clearly of a known (and even visible) Mulatto lineage
      (ex. Malcom Little/Malcolm X'; Muhammed Elijah; etc,)

      And – I'm sure many will agree with me when I say – 
      – I can hardly wait to see what you are creating -- it is
      so exciting to hear what your are doing and of the big
      picture direction in which you are taking this endeavor.

      -- A P

      P.S.

      A good resource for information on the people of
      Mulatto-lineage who were actively involved in and
      lead `The American Civil Rights Movement'  ––
      would be the VHS/DVD Video documentary series
      known as `Eyes on the Prize' (which can be found
      available at most Public and University Libraries).

      Also -- your inclusion of  some of the numerous
      (and extremely diverse) Mixed-Race that are
      largely of a Mulatto-based ancestral-lineage
      (ex. Tri-Racials, Tri-Racial Isolates, Creoles, etc.)
      -- is simply fantastic and very much appreciated.

      In Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com,
      j s <creolescience@ ...> wrote:

        I am working on an all-ages ( say 6th grade and up ) short graphic
      novel depicting the general history of the mulatto in the new world.
      I will use the broad definition of mulatto as a person who is mixed
      black and white as opposed to the strict bi-racial / 50-50 definition.

        In it I plan on including the slave trade, the one-drop rule,
      history of the Creoles and tri-racial isolates, the early
      civil-rights movement (which was basically created and
      led by mulattoes), the Harlem Renaissance as well
      as the modern developing "mixed-race movement".

        If anyone has any areas they feel need to be stressed
      or ideas please feel free to write me directly.

      Regards,
      Jeff


      All-new Yahoo! Mail - Fire up a more powerful email and get things done faster.

    • Erica (Raven) Branch-Butler
      This is great, Jeff. Glad to hear you re doing this. I would love for *someone* to make the point that not all of us who are Multi-generationally mixed are so
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 26, 2006
        This is great, Jeff. Glad to hear you're doing this.

        I would love for *someone* to make the point that not all of us who
        are Multi-generationally mixed are so because of a slave owner in the
        family. In my case, my Mother's great-Grandfather (maternal side) was
        Irish, her great Grandmother was mostly Native. Neither were slave owners.

        Raven

        In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
        j s <creolescience@...> wrote:

        I am working on an all-ages ( say 6th grade and up ) short graphic
        novel depicting the general history of the mulatto in the new world. I
        will use the broad definition of mulatto as a person who is mixed
        black and white as opposed to the strict bi-racial / 50-50 definition.

        In it I plan on including the slave trade, the one-drop rule,
        history of the Creoles and tri-racial isolates, the early civil-rights
        movement (which was basically created and led by mulattoes), the
        Harlem Renaissance as well as the modern developing "mixed-race movement".

        If anyone has any areas they feel need to be stressed or ideas
        please feel free to write me directly.

        Regards,
        Jeff
      • j s
        Good point - in fact when researching famous mixed people I found that alot had fathers directly from Africa. Though my focus will be predominantly on the
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 26, 2006
          Good point - in fact when researching famous mixed people I found that alot had fathers directly from Africa. Though my focus will be predominantly on the American mulatto whose background is pretty much grounded in slavery I will address Free People of Color and immigrant mulattoes as well
           
          Interestingly, a friend of mine in Europe says that the usual mix is an African born or 1st generation mom and a European dad. She says its more rare to see a black man with a white woman.
           


          "Erica (Raven) Branch-Butler" <golanv1@...> wrote:
          This is great, Jeff. Glad to hear you're doing this.

          I would love for *someone* to make the point that not all of us who
          are Multi-generationall y mixed are so because of a slave owner in the
          family. In my case, my Mother's great-Grandfather (maternal side) was
          Irish, her great Grandmother was mostly Native. Neither were slave owners.

          Raven

          In Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com,
          j s <creolescience@ ...> wrote:

          I am working on an all-ages ( say 6th grade and up ) short graphic
          novel depicting the general history of the mulatto in the new world. I
          will use the broad definition of mulatto as a person who is mixed
          black and white as opposed to the strict bi-racial / 50-50 definition.

          In it I plan on including the slave trade, the one-drop rule,
          history of the Creoles and tri-racial isolates, the early civil-rights
          movement (which was basically created and led by mulattoes), the
          Harlem Renaissance as well as the modern developing "mixed-race movement".

          If anyone has any areas they feel need to be stressed or ideas
          please feel free to write me directly.

          Regards,
          Jeff



          Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. Great rates starting at 1¢/min.

        • Erica (Raven) Branch-Butler
          Hmmn. Interesting. My family hails from Kentucky, and the mix was White (Irish) man and (my Uncle s word s) Mostly Native woman. But there s more Irish and
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 26, 2006
            Hmmm. Interesting. My family hails from Kentucky, and the mix was
            White (Irish) man and (my Uncle's word's) mostly Native woman.
            But there's more Irish and English in my family from other sources.
            I'm a quarter Cherokee, my Dad was half Cherokee
            and West-Indian/Black from out of Brooklyn, New York.

            Raven

            j s <creolescience@...> wrote:
            Good point - in fact when researching famous mixed
            people I found that a lot had fathers directly from Africa.

            Though my focus will be predominantly on the American mulatto
            whose background is pretty much grounded in slavery I will
            address Free People of Color and immigrant mulattoes as well

            Interestingly, a friend of mine in Europe says that the usual mix
            is an African born or 1st generation mom and a European dad.
            She says its more rare to see a black man with a white woman

            "Erica (Raven) Branch-Butler" <golanv1@yahoo. com> wrote:
            This is great, Jeff. Glad to hear you're doing this.

            I would love for *someone* to make the point that not all of us who
            are Multi-generationall y mixed are so because of a slave owner in the
            family. In my case, my Mother's great-Grandfather (maternal side) was
            Irish, her great Grandmother was mostly Native. Neither were slave owners.

            Raven

            In Generation-Mixed@ yahoogroups. com,
            j s <creolescience@ ...> wrote:

            I am working on an all-ages ( say 6th grade and up ) short graphic
            novel depicting the general history of the mulatto in the new world. I
            will use the broad definition of mulatto as a person who is mixed
            black and white as opposed to the strict bi-racial / 50-50 definition.

            In it I plan on including the slave trade, the one-drop rule,
            history of the Creoles and tri-racial isolates, the early civil-rights
            movement (which was basically created and led by mulattoes), the
            Harlem Renaissance as well as the modern developing "mixed-race movement".

            If anyone has any areas they feel need to be stressed or ideas
            please feel free to write me directly.

            Regards,
            Jeff

          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.