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Mixed-Race Composer -- 'Samuel Coleridge-Taylor'

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  • multiracialbookclub
    [Samuel Coleridge Taylor] Composer -- Samuel Coleridge-Taylor British composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor was born on August 15, 1875 in Croydon, a suburb of
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 12, 2006
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      Samuel Coleridge Taylor

      Composer -- 'Samuel Coleridge-Taylor'

      British composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor was born on
      August 15, 1875 in Croydon, a suburb of London , England . 

      His mother was an English woman named Alice Hare. 
      His father was Daniel Peter Taylor, a doctor and a native of Sierra Leone . 

      Apparently feeling that his career as a surgeon was blocked because he was
      black, his father returned to Africa, leaving Samuel and his mother in England.

      Samuel was then reared by his mother and step-father and at the
      age of fifteen, he entered the Royal College of Music to study
      the violin and he also studied composition with Stanford.
      He had works performed in public while still a student at the college.

      His best known work, which was immensely popular during his
      lifetime, is "Hiawatha", a trilogy based upon poems by Longfellow.

      He also wrote other works, such as ... "Five Choral Ballads".

      Very early on the composer began collaborating with the African
      American poet and author Paul Lawrence Dunbar (1872-1906). 
      The impact of his work and his person is further witnessed by his
      association with both Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois.
      An introduction to Coleridge-Taylor's Twenty-four Negro
      Melodies was written by Booker T. Washington.

      Also, in the foreword of his `Twenty-four Negro Melodies' Coleridge-Taylor
      thanks a number of people who have helped him find these melodies,
      but he mentions in particular, "...the late world-renowned and deeply
      lamented Frederick J. Loudin, manager of the famous 'Jubilee Singers',
      through whom I first learned to appreciate the beautiful folk-music
      of my race, and who did so much to make it known the world over."
      His love of the work of W.E.B. Du Bois is evidenced by an excerpt from
      a letter written to Mr. Andrew F. Hilyer, treasurer of the Coleridge-Taylor
      Society, who had sent him a copy of Du Bois' Souls of Black Folk:

      "This is only to thank you over and over again for
      so kindly sending me the book by Mr. Du Bois.
      It is about the finest book I have ever read by a coloured
      man and one of the best by any author, white and black. "

      DuBois'mutual admiration and respect for Coleridge-Taylor's work is
      a reflection of the pride and admiration felt by many African-Americans.
      The great esteem by which Coleridge-Taylor's life and work was held by African
      Americans is evidenced even today by two American schools bearing his name:
      in Louisville, Kentucky, The Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Elementary School
      (established in 1911 as a school for 'colored' children and named for the
      composer in 1913), and in Baltimore, Maryland, The Samuel Coleridge-Taylor
      Elementary School (Public School No. 122) established in 1926 as
      the first elementary school built for 'colored' children in Baltimore.

      Coleridge-Taylor rose to prominence in 1898,
      the year he turned 23, on the strength of two works. 

      The first was his  Ballade in A Minor
      The piece was a critical and popular success.
      Coleridge-Taylor's second major composition of 1898 was his
      musical Hiawatha's Wedding Feast, for which he is best known. 
      The work is a setting of verses from  Song of Hiawatha 
      by the American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. 

      He conducted its premier to great acclaim. 
      The work was staged hundreds of times in the
      United Kingdom alone during the next 15 years.

      The publicity surrounding  Hiawatha's Wedding Feast  created a
      huge demand for tours both within the United Kingdom and abroad. 
      During Coleridge-Taylor's lifetime it had a popularity in England
      equaled only by Handel's Messiah and Mendelssohn's Elijah!
       

      Among the most important for the composer's career
      were three tours of North America in 1904, 1906 and 1910.
      He visited the United States several times, in 1904, 1906, and 1910,
      where he was lionised as a role model for composers who were of any
      part-Black lineage and was even received by President Roosevelt
      an extraordinary event for a person of color at that time.
      The first concert of the 1904 tour was in Washington , D.C.  

      In the United States Coleridge-Taylor's music and work
      inspired the establishment of the Coleridge-Taylor Choral Society.
      This was a choral society in Washington , DC

      composed of some 200 African American singers for
      the purpose of performing Coleridge-Taylor's works.
      This society sponsored Samuel Coleridge-Taylor's first
      visit to the United States
      where he conducted
      them in a concert at Constitution Hall.
      This African American choir known as 'The Coleridge-Taylor
      Society', 
      appeared with the United States Marine
      Band, with the composer at the podium. 

      During his stay in the capital Coleridge-Taylor visited
      President Theodore Roosevelt at the White House.

      Along with conducting performances of his own large body of music,
      Coleridge-Taylor frequently appeared as conductor for the works of others.
      He held a permanent conducting position with the
      Handel Society of London from 1904 until his death.
      Coleridge-Taylor took on more and more teaching
      positions throughout his career, beginning in 1895. 
      At the time of his death he was a Lecturer at Croydon Conservatoire,
      and Professor of Composition at Trinity College of Music, Crystal
      Palace School of Art and Music, and Guildhall School of Music.

      Coleridge-Taylor married Jessie Walmisley on Dec. 30, 1899. 
      She was a pianist and a classmate of his at
      the Royal College of Music, where they met.

      On September 1, 1912 Samuel Coleridge-Taylor died of
      pneumonia complicated by exhaustion from overwork. 
      He was just 37 years old.

      Although he took on an excessive work load
      of composing, conducting and teaching,
      he still had difficulty supporting his family. 
      When he published a work of music he received
      only a small one-time payment from the publisher. 

      The circumstances of his death contributed greatly to the subsequent
      adoption of a system of royalties for composers in the U.K.

      Source(s):
      http://www.cambridgechorus.org/docs/comps/ SC-Taylor.html  
      http://chevalierdesaintgeorges.homestead.com/Song.html
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Coleridge-Taylor

    • multiracialbookclub
      Composer: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor [Samuel Coleridge Taylor] British composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor was born on August 15, 1875 in Croydon, ... His mother
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 23, 2006
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        Composer: 'Samuel Coleridge-Taylor'

        Samuel Coleridge Taylor

        British composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor
        was born on August 15, 1875 in Croydon,
        ---- a suburb of London , England . 

        His mother was a 'White' English woman named Alice Hare. 

        His father was Daniel Taylor, a doctor
        and a 'Black' native of Sierra Leone . 

        Apparently feeling that his career as a surgeon was
        blocked because he was Black, his father returned
        to Africa, leaving Samuel and his mother in England.

        Samuel was then reared by his mother and step-father and at
        the age of fifteen, he entered the Royal College of Music to
        study the violin and he also studied composition with Stanford.

        He had works performed in public while still a student at the college.

        His best known work, which was immensely popular during his
        lifetime, is "Hiawatha", a trilogy based upon poems by Longfellow.

        He also wrote other works, such as ... "Five Choral Ballads".

        Very early on the composer began collaborating
        with the African-American poet and author
        Paul Lawrence Dunbar (1872-1906). 

        The impact of his work and his person is further
        witnessed by his association with both
        Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois.



        An introduction to Coleridge-Taylor's Twenty-four Negro
        Melodies was written by Booker T. Washington.

        Also, in the foreword of his `Twenty-four Negro Melodies' Coleridge-Taylor
        thanks a number of people who have helped him find these melodies,
        but he mentions in particular, "...the late world-renowned and deeply
        lamented Frederick J. Loudin, manager of the famous 'Jubilee Singers',
        through whom I first learned to appreciate the beautiful folk-music
        of my race, and who did so much to make it known the world over."

        His love of the work of W.E.B. Du Bois is evidenced by an excerpt from
        a letter written to Mr. Andrew F. Hilyer, treasurer of the Coleridge-Taylor
        Society, who had sent him a copy of Du Bois' Souls of Black Folk:

        "This is only to thank you over and over again for
        so kindly sending me the book by Mr. Du Bois.
        It is about the finest book I have ever read by a coloured
        man and one of the best by any author, white and black. "

        DuBois' mutual admiration and respect for Coleridge-Taylor's work is
        a reflection of the pride and admiration felt by many African-Americans.

        The great esteem by which Coleridge-Taylor's life and work was held by African
        Americans is evidenced even today by two American schools bearing his name:

        in Louisville, Kentucky, The Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Elementary School
        (established in 1911 as a school for 'colored' children and named for the
        composer in 1913), and in Baltimore, Maryland, The Samuel Coleridge-Taylor
        Elementary School (Public School No. 122) established in 1926
        as
        the first elementary school built for 'colored' children in Baltimore
        .

        Coleridge-Taylor rose to prominence in 1898,
        the year he turned 23, on the strength of two works. 

        The first was his  Ballade in A Minor
        The piece was a critical and popular success.

        Coleridge-Taylor's second major composition of 1898 was his
        musical Hiawatha's Wedding Feast, for which he is best known. 
        The work is a setting of verses from  Song of Hiawatha 
        by the American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. 

        He conducted its premier to great acclaim. 
        The work was staged hundreds of times in the
        United Kingdom alone during the next 15 years.

        The publicity surrounding  Hiawatha's Wedding Feast created a
        huge demand for tours both within the United Kingdom and abroad. 

        During Coleridge-Taylor's lifetime it had a popularity in England
        equaled only by Handel's Messiah and Mendelssohn's Elijah!
         


        Among the most important for the composer's career
        were three tours of North America in 1904, 1906 and 1910.

        He visited the United States several times, in 1904, 1906, and 1910,
        where he was lionised as a role model for composers who were of any
        part-Black lineage and was even received by President Roosevelt
        --- an extraordinary event for a-person-of-color at that time.

        The first concert of the 1904 tour was in Washington , D.C.  

        In the United States Coleridge-Taylor's music and work
        inspired the establishment of the Coleridge-Taylor Choral Society.

        This was a choral society in Washington , DC

        composed of some 200 African American singers for
        the purpose of performing Coleridge-Taylor's works.

        This society sponsored Samuel Coleridge-Taylor's first
        visit to the United States
        where he conducted
        them in a concert at Constitution Hall.

        This African American choir known as 'The Coleridge-Taylor
        Society', 
        appeared with the United States Marine
        Band, with the composer at the podium. 

        During his stay in the capital Coleridge-Taylor visited
        President Theodore Roosevelt at the White House.

        Along with conducting performances of his own large
        body of music, Coleridge-Taylor frequently appeared
        as conductor for the works of others.

        He held a permanent conducting position with the
        Handel Society of London from 1904 until his death.

        Coleridge-Taylor took on more and more teaching
        positions throughout his career, beginning in 1895. 

        At the time of his death he was a Lecturer at Croydon
        Conservatoire, and Professor of Composition at
        Trinity College of Music, Crystal Palace School
        of Art and Music, and Guildhall School of Music.

        Coleridge-Taylor married Jessie Walmisley on Dec. 30, 1899. 

        She was a pianist and a classmate of his at
        the Royal College of Music, where they met.



        On September 1, 1912 Samuel Coleridge-Taylor died of
        pneumonia complicated by exhaustion from overwork. 
        He was just 37 years old.

        Although he took on an excessive work load
        of composing, conducting and teaching,
        he still had difficulty supporting his family. 

        When he published a work of music he received
        only a small one-time payment from the publisher. 

        The circumstances of his death contributed
        greatly to the subsequent
        adoption of a
        system of royalties for composers in the U.K
        .


        Source(s):
        http://www.cambridgechorus.org/docs/comps/ SC-Taylor.html  
        http://chevalierdesaintgeorges.homestead.com/Song.html
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Coleridge-Taylor

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