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Re:Peter The Long-Past Days of "Passing" & 'Posing'

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  • Peter Barrett
    Hi Lynn, You are correct she was a strong woman. In her time she couldn t marry a white man. I feel it was due to her situation. She was emancipated and given
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 4, 2006
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      Hi Lynn,

      You are correct she was a strong woman.
      In her time she couldn't marry a white man.
      I feel it was due to her situation. She was
      emancipated and given a protector who was a relative.
      She owned property. She sold some of her property to
      a local organization, she also sold property to her
      two children with the stipulation she could live
      out her days on the property with her children.

      Back to the cohabitation.
      There aren't any marriage records which could be lost.
      There is a baptismal record for one of her
      children again with no evidence of marriage.
      Being in Louisiana this was a common practice.
      She didn't use the men's names as a married woman, she used her
      maiden name. It isn't a big deal that is just the way it was.
      She died at 102 in 1931. Many women of that time did
      what they had to, so they wouln't end up destitute.
      These men were considered wealthy or well to do in that day.
      Things probably changed after the Civil War.
      Couldn't read or write both white and
      black and were still entreprenuers.
      Take care.

      Peter


      In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
      "Lynn" <wintyreeve@...> wrote:

      Hello Peter-

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts and insights.
      That is quite an amazing family history! I would suggest
      writing down your history, and what your life is like now...

      RE: My 2nd great grandmother her daughter probably never married
      and cohabitated with white men and children with them.

      There may be a reason for this. Did you ever find out more about her?
      Were there more than one man involved? What I found is that some
      women from the early part of the century who had children with
      more than one man, and were not married were women who either
      had a husband who died, who were abandoned by their significant
      other or who were vulnerable/destitute in some way.
      Then again it takes a lot of courage and strength to go through
      that kind of heartache, raise children on your own, and provide
      for a family on your own...especially at a time where there
      was no public assistance or daycare available and society
      spit on you for your situation. That's a strong woman!

      I hope you are well.

      God Bless, Lynn
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