Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: The Mixed-Race Lineage of the 'African-Americans'

Expand Messages
  • multiracialbookclub
    In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com, Peter Barrett inquired: Can someone also tell me where the 70% of admixture for AA was found? … If
    Message 1 of 13 , May 3 9:45 PM
    • 0 Attachment

      In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
      "Peter Barrett" <barac1998@...> inquired:

      Can someone also tell me where the 70% of admixture for AA was found?
      … If anyone has more information on this it would be appreciated.

      Note: 
      Said inquiry was made in regards to the post found at the following link:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1032

      My response:

      That's a really excellent good question and hopefully, the
      following information may be of help in answering it…. :-?

      Some of the sources can be found listed within the following link
      :
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1003

      Other sources are also found in various other postings at this group.

      In addition, there are many other sources that also note said figure
      (both online and in print) ... some of these include the following:


      "With some figures showing 70% of African
      Americans fitting into a multiracial category,"

      Source: http://www.interracialvoice.com/editor10.html

      "Seventy to eighty percent of so-called
      "blacks" are of mixed racial heritage."
      Source: http://www.digitas.harvard.edu/~perspy/old/issues/1997/may/boxing.html

      "Most writers on the subject of American black-white
      miscegenation, for instance, estimate that seventy to
      ninety percent of African Americans have white ancestry"

      Source: http://www.webcom.com/~intvoice/zack.html

      "Seventy percent of …African Americans … are
      mixed with … mostly Scottish Irish and Native
      American, yet … defined as "black".
      Hispanics, like "blacks", have an equal
      amount of race mixing in their ethnic group."
      Source: http://www.blackcanada.com/news_7.htm

      Here is an very interesting observation made regarding
      the historical creation of the largely `Multi'-Racial /
      Mixed-Race African-American Ethnic group --

      "During slavery there were, of course, frequent
      mixed race births, many resulting from the rape of
      enslaved "black" women by white slave owners.
      Between 1850 and 1860, the "Mulatto" [i.e. Mixed-Race]
      slave population increased by 67 percent; in contrast, the
      'Black' slave population increased by only 20 percent.
      At about this time, the notion of "Hypodescent",
      or The "One-Drop Rule," became prevalent.
      This is the idea that someone with even
      one distant African ancestor is black ...
      The 1890 census added further distinctions and had
      categories for White, Black, Mulatto, Quadroon,
      Octoroon, Chinese, Japanese, and Indian.
      By 1910 the Census Bureau had eliminated the terms
      mulatto, quadroon, and octoroon …
      three-quarters of
      all "blacks" in the United States were racially mixed
      …

      Anyone [listed] as African American
      would henceforth be counted as "black"
      ."

      Source: `Race and Mixed Race `by Naomi Zack
      (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1993)

      http://www.oah.org/pubs/magazine/family/cruz-berson.html

      Also -- here is an interesting observation someone made:

      "Joshua R. Goldstein and Ann J. Morning, of
      the Office of Population Research, Princeton
      University, February 29, 2000, wrote for the
      Russell Sage Foundation a paper investigating
      the ramifications of multiple-"race" responses
      on the then-pending 2000 census. 
      The paper entitled, "The multiple-race population of
      the United States : Issues and estimates," appeared in
      the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 
      These researchers clearly stumbled
      on some interesting observations: 
      Classifying those indicating more "races" than one
      puts Government in a seven-way bind, either ...
      opening a way out for potentially seventy percent of
      African Americans
      to [leave] "their" Black race...

      The researchers above further noticed that
      ...
      census "race" data collection is
      [both] politicized and … arbitrary..."

      (Source: http://www.webcom.com/~intvoice/point5.html
      and the entire paper, a 96K byte PDF file, can be found at
      http://www.pnas.org/cgi/reprint/100086897.pdf.)

      In addition, listed below is a perfect example of
      how statistics regarding the `African-Americans'
      are almost always completely false and erroneous.

      In this article – the writer openly makes the mistake of
      perceiving the Afro-Latino `Cultural' grouping AND the
      African-American `Ethnic' as being one and the same
      people grouping – then wrongfully combines the statistics
      of these two separate groups and then falsely presents them
      as if they are statistics about the African-Americans.

      Here is an example of one of the many erroneous
      `statistics' that can be found within this article:

      "In 1997, however, 55 percent of African Americans
      (including black Hispanics) lived in the South."
      Source:
      http://www.faculty.fairfield.edu/faculty/hodgson/RussiaDiversity/PBRaceEthnicity/PBRaceEthnicity.html

      As stated numerous times -- a person cannot be a part of the 'African-American'
      (AA) Ethnic grouping simply because they are a citizen or resident of the United
      States of America and also happen to be of some-part Black admixture.
      The AAs are a very specific and unique largely 'Multi'-Racial / Mixed-Race
      'Ethnic' grouping of people -- and groups such as Afro-Latinos; West Indians;
      African, etc. -- should not be enumerated as part of the so-called "statistics"
      regarding the AAs -- yet -- due to manipulation by the media and various
      political and government bureaucratic group -- every person in America who
      is of any-part Black ancestry is often falsely listed as also being an AA.

      This false categorization and enumeration has created a tremendous
      and unfair burden for those people who truly are of the AA Ethnicity.


      It should also be noticed in the chart contained in that
      same article that -- while `White', `Asian' and "American
      Indian" (again, another misnomer) have all been given the
      decency and dignity of being listed under separate "Racial"
      groups – and the term "Hispanic" has been listed under
      a separate `Cultural' group – only one (1) group -- the
      African-American `Ethnic', of course – has (yet, again)
      been forced to falsely `carry the statistics' for everyone
      in the United States of every person in the United States
      who is "of some part-Black ancestry" (no matter the
      true `Ethnic', `Cultural' or even `Racial' grouping)

      Actions such as found in this article – are (once again) –
      one of the very main reasons that the average so-called
      "statistic" (and even many of the various "definitions"
      …. such as the extremely erroneous "definition" found
      at the online "encyclopedia" known as `Wikipedia') –
      which are alleged to be about the `African-Americans'
      are almost always generally `false', `inaccurate' and
      `negative' and simply cannot be relied upon for the true
      state of affairs for this very diverse Ethnic grouping.

      As stated previously -- when just "any American (citizen or resident)
      of African descent" is erroneously listed as being an AA, however,
      naturally the "statistics" (ranging from --- educational grades,
      diplomas and degrees; to data on welfare rolls, recipients and
      amounts; to employment ratings; to socio-political-economic status
      and opinions; to family structure and environment; to crime, to STD
      / HIV/ AIDS and so on) which falsely claim to be in regards to the
      AA Ethnicity are then going to erroneously show "negative" results.

      Two excellent books on this subject are "Black Robes,
      White Justice" (written by FGM-Mixed New York
      Supreme Court Justice, Bruce Wright) and also
      "Don't Believe the Hype: Fighting Cultural
      Misinformation about  African-Americans" (written
      by FGM-Mixed, Reporter / Researcher, Ferai Chideya).

      http://gpn.unl.edu/cml/cml_product.asp?catalog_name=GPN&category_name=Don't+Believe+the+Hype&product_id=1501
       
      http://www.powerbooksearch.com/booksearch0758201109.html

      Source: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1032


      Hope this information is of some help in getting you
      off to a fairly good start on your research in this area.

      Have a great day. :)

    • wintyreeve@aol.com
      My cousin told me that she prefers to be labelled as Black because she has never been to Africa, and can t relate to what life is like there. Other
      Message 2 of 13 , May 3 11:39 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        My cousin told me that she prefers to be labeled as "black" because
        she has never been to Africa, and can't relate to what life is like there.

        Other relatives will label themselves as "black" and ignore the other racial
        admixtures in the family either because they don't know, they don't care
        or they just assume that the color of your skin identifies what you are.
        This gets a bit confusing when I go to family reunions...LOL* I tell
        everyone that I am mixed, and brag about all the mixtures in our family.

        In Minnesota, the African immigrants almost always refer to
        themselves as African or identify with their country of origin.
        They also may refer to their identity in terms of religion.
        If you look at Hmong immigrants. They identify themselves
        as Hmong, not Hmong-American. Same with Latinos.
        They are Latinos, not Latin-Americans. I don't know
        about where you all live...that's just the trend here.

        So I guess being African-American, in a sense, is
        really what it is. Or no? What else do you call it?

        I mean if you are "Black" then that excludes the
        mixed people who would not fit the description.

        African-American seems to represent a racially mixed heritage.

        What do you think??

        Smiles, Lynn
      • multiracialbookclub
        In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com , Lynn wrote: ... African-American seems to represent a
        Message 3 of 13 , May 4 1:00 AM
        • 0 Attachment

          In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
          " Lynn " <wintyreeve@...> wrote:

          ... African-American seems to represent a
          racially mixed heritage. What do you think??



          My reply:


          That's a very insightful perception and you make a good point.

          In fact -- when one thinks about it -- of the two
          terms – the term
          `African-American' (although still
          something of a misnomer, in my humble opinion

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1032)
          --- is actually quite clearly much closer to being a descriptor
          of or implication for a person having a Mixed-Race Ancestry
          (especially perhaps once the origin of the term is `explained' to the
          hearer) --- than is the term
          "Black" (as, when referred to "racially" 
          ...  rather than socio-politically... would imply adherence to
          the racist One-Drop Rule/The Rule of Hypo-Descent and to also
          imply a denial of a person's non-Black/other-American lineage).


          In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
          " Lynn " <wintyreeve@...> wrote:

          My cousin told me that she prefers to be labeled
          as "black" because she has never been to Africa ,
          and can't relate to what life is like there.

          Other relatives will label themselves as "black" and
          ignore the other racial admixtures in the family either
          because they don't know, they don't care or they just
          assume that the color of your skin identifies what you are...

          So I guess being African-American, in a sense, is
          really what it is. Or no? What else do you call it?

          I mean if you are "Black" then that excludes the
          mixed people who would not fit the description.

          African-American seems to represent a racially mixed heritage.

          What do you think??

          Smiles, Lynn

        • Tyrone Anderson
          I think African-American represent a culturally mixed group Bi-Cultural with on the next level can man that members of this group are mixed. I say
          Message 4 of 13 , May 4 5:09 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            I think African-American represent a 'culturally 'mixed'' group Bi-Cultural
            with on the next level can man that members of this group are mixed.

            I say bi-cultural because 1st, their are cultural combinations
            that came together to make this group, secondly a lot of it was
            passed from 'ethnic' descendants of other ethnic groups:native
            american, french, english, irish, chinese, or passed from the
            adoption of other cultures by people not ethnically related.

            wintyreeve@... wrote:
            My cousin told me that she prefers to be labeled as "black" because
            she has never been to Africa, and can't relate to what life is like there.

            Other relatives will label themselves as "black" and ignore the other racial
            admixtures in the family either because they don't know, they don't care
            or they just assume that the color of your skin identifies what you are.
            This gets a bit confusing when I go to family reunions...LOL* I tell
            everyone that I am mixed, and brag about all the mixtures in our family.

            In Minnesota, the African immigrants almost always refer to
            themselves as African or identify with their country of origin.
            They also may refer to their identity in terms of religion.
            If you look at Hmong immigrants. They identify themselves
            as Hmong, not Hmong-American. Same with Latinos.
            They are Latinos, not Latin-Americans. I don't know
            about where you all live...that's just the trend here.

            So I guess being African-American, in a sense, is
            really what it is. Or no? What else do you call it?

            I mean if you are "Black" then that excludes the
            mixed people who would not fit the description.

            African-American seems to represent a racially mixed heritage.

            What do you think??

            Smiles, Lynn



            "Man would rather be a little higher than the apes, than a little lower than the angels." -"I am Black & I am White, and know there is no difference. Each one casts a shadow, and all shadows are dark." -Walter White
          • multiracialbookclub
            That s another good point as well. It s also good food for thought . [:-?] Thanks for sharing it. In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 13 , May 4 6:36 AM
            • 0 Attachment

              That's another good point as well. 
              It's also good 'food for thought'.:-?

              Thanks for sharing it.


              In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
              Tyrone Anderson <gemini072@...> wrote:

              I think African-American represent a culturally
              'mixed' group -- Bi-Cultural which on the next level
              can mean that members of this group are mixed.

              I say Bi-Cultural because 1st, there are cultural combinations
              that came together to make this group, secondly a lot of it
              was passed from 'ethnic' descendants of other ethnic groups:
              native american, french, english, irish, chinese, or passed from
              the adoption of other cultures by people not ethnically related.


              In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
              "Lynn" <
              wintyreeve@...> wrote:

              My cousin told me that she prefers to be labeled
              as "black" because she has never been to Africa,
              and can't relate to what life is like there.

              Other relatives will label themselves as "black" and
              ignore the other racial admixtures in the family either
              because they don't know, they don't care or they just
              assume that the color of your skin identifies what you are.

              This gets a bit confusing when I go to family reunions...LOL*
              I tell everyone that I am mixed, and
              brag about all the mixtures in our family.

              In Minnesota, the African immigrants almost always refer to
              themselves as African or identify with their country of origin.
              They also may refer to their identity in terms of religion.
              If you look at Hmong immigrants. They identify themselves
              as Hmong, not Hmong-American. Same with Latinos.
              They are Latinos, not Latin-Americans. I don't know
              about where you all live...that's just the trend here.

              So I guess being African-American, in a sense, is
              really what it is. Or no? What else do you call it?

              I mean if you are "Black" then that excludes the
              mixed people who would not fit the description.

              African-American seems to represent a racially mixed heritage.

              What do you think??

              Smiles, Lynn

               

              "Man would rather be a little higher than the apes,
              than a little lower than the angels." - "I am Black
              I am White, and know there is no difference. Each one
              casts a shadow, and all shadows are dark." -Walter White

            • barac1998@aol.com
              I agree. I have always looked at term African American as a mixed cultural blend and have taught it that way as well. Peter
              Message 6 of 13 , May 4 9:26 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                I agree. I have always looked at term African American as a mixed cultural blend and have taught it that way as well.
                 
                Peter
              • multiracialbookclub
                Peter wrote: I agree. I have always looked at term African American as a mixed cultural blend and have taught it that way as well. Peter
                Message 7 of 13 , May 4 10:30 AM
                • 0 Attachment

                  "Peter" <barac1998@... >wrote:

                  I agree. I have always looked at term 'African American' as
                  a mixed cultural blend and have taught it that way as well.
                   
                  Peter

                  Reply:

                  Agreed.
                   

                  And while I do feel that the term `African-American' is
                  (like the term `American-Indian') a type of misnomer
                  …  I do not have a problem with it's usage (particularly
                  seeing that, as Ty, Lynn and Peter have pointed out, the
                  term can most certainly be said to have an indication that
                  the members of said Ethnicity would most likely be of a
                  Mixed-Race / `Multi'-Racial Ancestry … wherein the term
                  `Black' would *not* seem to indicate any such Ancestry) .

                  My main concern actually centers around `the lack of true
                  knowledge about the AAs' that is quite commonly found 
                  among and displayed by a good number of the members
                  of the American media, government, and census poll
                  takers … many of whom seem to have *no* remote concept
                  (thanks, again to the United States Census Bureau (USCB)
                  and it's hopelessly flawed-form, that's been used since 1990)
                  that the `African-Americans' (AAs) are *not* at all the same
                  group as the `Black-Americans' (BAs) and also that, as a
                  result of this lack of knowledge, the AAs seem to be the
                  *only* `Ethnic' group found in America (or the world)
                  that is forced to BOTH 1) live with society's denial
                  of it's Mixed-Race lineage AND 2) carry the unfair
                  burden of falsely being used to represent an entire
                  "Racial" grouping of people (largely due to the Rule
                  of Hypo-Descent / One-Drop Rule and the USCB).

                  As stated earlier – rather than look for a whole new name
                  or label for this largely `Multi'-Racial / Mixed-Race `Ethnic'
                  Group --- I truly feel that `Education' and the sharing of
                  knowledge and TRUE information about the AAs may be
                  a, if not `the', key step
                  in helping them to be able; feel free to
                  and have full 
                  support in publicly embracing and proclaiming
                  their FULL Ancestry and true Identity as well as also having
                  TRUE statistics provided about them (rather than the
                  so-called `common knowledge' false-statistics that have
                  been created by the forcing of them to – without any say
                  in the matter -- represent and to carry the statistics for
                  every citizen and resident in the United States of America
                  who just happens to have some/ any amount of Black lineage).


                  Related Links:

                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1045
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1043
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1032

                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.