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Re: DNA

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  • multiracialbookclub
    Yes -- I was able to see it as well. It was called African-American Lives and starred Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
    Message 1 of 12 , May 2, 2006
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      Yes -- I was able to see it as well.

      It was called 'African-American Lives'
      and starred Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

      http://www.pbs.org/previews/africanamericanlives/

      It was a really good documentary.

      In fact, it was much better than and much more
      different from what the 'previews' of it would
      have led one to believe it would focus on.

      The 'previews' seemed to indicate that the documentary would
      discuss either 'only' or 'largely' the 'West African' lineage
      of the average person who was a member of the (largely
      'Multi'-Racial/Mixed-Race) Ethnic group currently being
      referred to by the misnomer of 'African-American' ...
      when, in actuality, the documentary instead showed how DNA
      testing often proves that the average 'African-American'
      actually more than likely has a rather very significant
      amount of Amerindian, European, and even Asian ancestry
      found in their familial bloodlines (as well as African).

      In fact, if memory serves me correctly -- didn't
      Gates discover that abouth half of his lineage was
      of White/European ancestry or something like that?

      One point that I thought was very interesting was the
      African-American woman (I think it was the professor)
      who had always been under the impression that her
      ancestral admixture was essentially West African
      and North Amerindian -- only to discover that, she
      too, had nearly one-half White/European lineage.

      And, I think it was Dr. Mae Jemmison (the astronaut) who
      was surprised to discover her Asian ancestry and noting
      how it just reminded her of how when she worked in Southeast
      Asia -- some of her Asian collegues kept telling her how
      she looked so much like certain of their various relatives.

      In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
      Lynn <wintyreeve@...> wrote:

      Hi Friends,

      I watched this show on PBS--forgot the name--about the
      college professor who began the DNA project to trace
      the ancestry of famous "black" people like Oprah &
      Chris Tucker to see what their racial ancestry was...
      and if their perceptions of their race matched the DNA.
      I thought it was so weird how the Professor was so proud
      to be "Black" and when he found out, through DNA, that
      he has ancestry from Europe (England, Scotland) he
      didn't want to know about that side of his family.
      His whole focus was on Africa.

      Did anyone see that documentary?

      Best, Lynn
    • wintyreeve@aol.com
      In fact, if memory serves me correctly -- didn t Gates discover that abouth half of his lineage was of White/European ancestry or something like that? Gates
      Message 2 of 12 , May 2, 2006
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        Question:

        In fact, if memory serves me correctly -- didn't
        Gates discover that abouth half of his lineage was
        of White/European ancestry or something like that? color


        Answer:

        Gates family, when they did the DNA tests, had a
        lot of hits in Europe, Scotland and I think France.

        The test was really sophisticated. You took a DNA sample then it was matched
        by similiar characteristics with other racial groups, who were plotted on a map.
        The DNA mapping was only as accurate as the number of samples
        collected, because that offered a pool of information/genetics.

        When Gates discovered his White lineage, he did not delve into it.
        He looked past it, acknowledged it, then focused on Africa.

        I LOVED the documentary--the work he did was just unbelievable.
        Not to mention that Gates was teaching at the same time, and
        really bringing new awareness and information in the class room.

        However, I felt that Gates had a bias or a lack of interest in his White lineage.
        He knew it was there but really didn't take the time
        to study it, or research it. He just focused on Africa.
         
        It's not the most comfortable thing to look at your family and see that someone
        has done something awful--especially to think that your lineage could have been a result
        of rape, and your grandmother was kept in slavery & humiliated in the worst ways.

        But being mixed--I feel a need to confront the past, whatever it is.
        I can't just cut off part of my identity--who I am.
        What I can do is shape the life I live now, and what I pass on to my kids.
        And the fighter in me is proud to say I am White too--
        even if way back when someone was a slave holder.
        I am going to take that lineage, that history and own it.
        In acknowledging who I am, and acknowledging where I came from...I feel
        I am taking back my identity, and giving my family back our sense of self.
        We are who we are, no longer being controlled by shame or fear.
         
        What did you think about Chris Tucker returning to Africa,
        and the village where his ancestors once lived?
        All that came to my mind--over and over--was how many times Chris had used
        the n word, and made racist jokes and just put himself out there in a rude way.
        he's lucky those villagers did not have a TV or see his movies.
        Because they probably would have a lot to say to him--and not
        want him to represent their people, their family in that way.
        But that was an amazing journey too...
         
        What can I say...you gotta see this documentary :)
         
        Lynn
         
        For some Americans, the essential question - "Where do I come from?"
        - cannot be answered; their history has been lost or stolen.
        But through genealogical research and groundbreaking DNA analysis,
        AFRICAN AMERICAN LIVES not only provides a transformational discovery
        for several prominent African Americans, but also serves as an example for
        all Americans of the empowerment derived from knowing their heritage.
         
      • Peter Barrett
        I saw the last episode. I agree it was very interesting. I surprised that Gates test came out 50% European. I know that can happen. It seems that DNA is
        Message 3 of 12 , May 3, 2006
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          I saw the last episode. I agree it was very interesting.
          I surprised that Gates test came out 50% European. I know that
          can happen. It seems that DNA is answering a lot of questions.
          I have been tracing my family history for years and want to
          see if DNA testing will help out with some of the roadblocks.

          Are there any Louisana Creoles here that have taken the test?
          I would be curious about anyone's finding, but especially the Creoles.

          It is my understanding they can only tell you if it is European
          for instance but not Western European to be specific, correct?

          Thanks for the feedback guys and the link
          for the test, I really appreciate it.

          In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
          "multiracialbookclub" <soaptalk@...> wrote:

          Yes -- I was able to see it as well.

          It was called 'African-American Lives'
          and starred Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

          http://www.pbs.org/previews/africanamericanlives/

          It was a really good documentary.

          In fact, it was much better than and much more
          different from what the 'previews' of it would
          have led one to believe it would focus on.

          The 'previews' seemed to indicate that the documentary would
          discuss either 'only' or 'largely' the 'West African' lineage
          of the average person who was a member of the (largely
          'Multi'-Racial/Mixed-Race) Ethnic group currently being
          referred to by the misnomer of 'African-American' ...
          when, in actuality, the documentary instead showed how DNA
          testing often proves that the average 'African-American'
          actually more than likely has a rather very significant
          amount of Amerindian, European, and even Asian ancestry
          found in their familial bloodlines (as well as African).

          In fact, if memory serves me correctly -- didn't
          Gates discover that abouth half of his lineage was
          of White/European ancestry or something like that?

          One point that I thought was very interesting was the
          African-American woman (I think it was the professor)
          who had always been under the impression that her
          ancestral admixture was essentially West African
          and North Amerindian -- only to discover that, she
          too, had nearly one-half White/European lineage.

          And, I think it was Dr. Mae Jemmison (the astronaut) who
          was surprised to discover her Asian ancestry and noting
          how it just reminded her of how when she worked in Southeast
          Asia -- some of her Asian collegues kept telling her how
          she looked so much like certain of their various relatives.

          In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
          Lynn <wintyreeve@> wrote:

          Hi Friends,

          I watched this show on PBS--forgot the name--about the
          college professor who began the DNA project to trace
          the ancestry of famous "black" people like Oprah &
          Chris Tucker to see what their racial ancestry was...
          and if their perceptions of their race matched the DNA.
          I thought it was so weird how the Professor was so proud
          to be "Black" and when he found out, through DNA, that
          he has ancestry from Europe (England, Scotland) he
          didn't want to know about that side of his family.
          His whole focus was on Africa.

          Did anyone see that documentary?

          Best, Lynn
        • Peter Barrett
          It is very refreshing that you are taking that approach toward your identity. I know many of my family members don t see it that way. Did you research your
          Message 4 of 12 , May 3, 2006
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            It is very refreshing that you are
            taking that approach toward your identity.
            I know many of my family members don't see it that way.
            Did you research your family history
            and find out more about yourself?

            I knew some things about my family but didn't
            know where things may have occurred or even what.
            You do have to look at history right in the face.
            What has happened, has happened and nothing will change it.
            If our ancestors could live through it we should
            certainly be able to own it and talk about.

            One of my ancestors was owned by her father along with her
            mother and siblings. They were emancipated upon his death.
            There is a sense of strength when knowing
            the path of at least some of you ancestors.

            In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
            “lynn” <wintyreeve@...> wrote:

            But being mixed--I feel a need to confront the past, whatever
            it is. I can't just cut off part of my identity--who I am.
            What I can do is shape the life I live
            now, and what I pass on to my kids.
            And the fighter in me is proud to say I am White too
            --even if way back when someone was a slave holder.
            I am going to take that lineage, that history and own it.
            In acknowledging who I am, and acknowledging where I
            came from ...I feel I am taking back my identity,
            and giving my family back our sense of self.
            We are who we are, no longer being controlled by shame or fear.
          • multiracialbookclub
            If I can adequately recall ... I think that ... (as Lynn s post had noted at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1022
            Message 5 of 12 , May 3, 2006
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              If I can adequately recall ... I think that ... (as Lynn's post had noted
              at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1022)
              the DNA Tests given were able to determine both the 'amount' of the
              White, Asian or European lineage in the "African-Americans" tested 
              ----- and they were also even able to specify (find the `hits' for)
              the exact or at least the near exact 'regions' of the continents
              from which the lineage was derived (ex. Ireland , Scotland ,
              France , -- in Europe; China , etc. -- in Asia; Northern
              Amerindian tribes -- in the Americas and so on.) as well.


              In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
              "Peter Barrett" <barac1998@...> wrote:

              I saw the last episode. I agree it was very interesting.
              I surprised that Gates test came out 50% European. I know that
              can happen. It seems that DNA is answering a lot of questions.
              I have been tracing my family history for years and want to
              see if DNA testing will help out with some of the roadblocks.

              Are there any Louisana Creoles here that have taken the test?
              I would be curious about anyone's finding, but especially the Creoles.

              It is my understanding they can only tell you if it is European
              for instance but not Western European to be specific, correct?

              Thanks for the feedback guys and the link
              for the test, I really appreciate it.


              In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
              "multiracialbookclub" <soaptalk@...> wrote:


              Yes -- I was able to see it as well.

              It was called 'African-American Lives'
              and starred Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

              http://www.pbs.org/previews/africanamericanlives/

              It was a really good documentary.

              In fact, it was much better than and much more
              different from what the 'previews' of it would
              have led one to believe it would focus on.

              The 'previews' seemed to indicate that the documentary would
              discuss either 'only' or 'largely' the 'West African' lineage
              of the average person who was a member of the (largely
              'Multi'-Racial/Mixed-Race) Ethnic group currently being
              referred to by the misnomer of 'African-American' ...
              when, in actuality, the documentary instead showed how DNA
              testing often proves that the average 'African-American'
              actually more than likely has a rather very significant
              amount of Amerindian, European, and even Asian ancestry
              found in their familial bloodlines (as well as African).

              In fact, if memory serves me correctly -- didn't
              Gates discover that abouth half of his lineage was
              of White/European ancestry or something like that?

              One point that I thought was very interesting was the
              African-American woman (I think it was the professor)
              who had always been under the impression that her
              ancestral admixture was essentially West African
              and North Amerindian -- only to discover that, she
              too, had nearly one-half White/European lineage.

              And, I think it was Dr. Mae Jemmison (the astronaut) who
              was surprised to discover her Asian ancestry and noting
              how it just reminded her of how when she worked in Southeast
              Asia -- some  of her Asian collegues kept telling her how
              she looked so much like certain of their various relatives.


              In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
              Lynn <wintyreeve@> wrote:

              Hi Friends,

              I watched this show on PBS--forgot the name--about the
              college professor who began the DNA project to trace
              the ancestry of famous "black" people like Oprah &
              Chris Tucker to see what their racial ancestry was...
              and if their perceptions of their race matched the DNA.
              I thought it was so weird how the Professor was so proud
              to be "Black" and  when he found out, through DNA, that
              he has ancestry from Europe (England, Scotland) he
              didn't want to know about that side of his family.
              His whole focus  was on Africa.

              Did anyone see that documentary?

              Best, Lynn

            • multiracialbookclub
              Agreed! 100%, Peter! In addition, Lynn s poem –- `The Secret River (found at the link below) -- is still one of the most truthful and powerful essays that I
              Message 6 of 12 , May 3, 2006
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                Agreed! 100%, Peter!

                In addition, Lynn's poem –- `The Secret River' (found at the
                link below) -- is still one of the most truthful and powerful
                essays that I have ever read on the matter of the right to
                personally-claim and publicly-proclaim one's FULL ancestry.

                In addition, I also feel that it helps to provide some really
                interesting insight on why many `Multi'-racial/Mixed-Race
                people of a given previous generation may have chose
                to "pass" themselves off as being `mono'-racial and
                or simply as socio-politically "identifying" as such).

                Have you had a chance to read `The Secret River' yet?

                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/977
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/992

                In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
                "Peter Barrett" <barac1998@...> wrote:

                It is very refreshing that you are
                taking that approach toward your identity.
                I know many of my family members don't see it that way.
                Did you research your family history
                and find out more about yourself?

                I knew some things about my family but didn't
                know where things may have occurred or even what.
                You do have to look at history right in the face.
                What has happened, has happened and nothing will change it.
                If our ancestors could live through it we should
                certainly be able to own it and talk about.

                One of my ancestors was owned by her father along with her
                mother and siblings. They were emancipated upon his death.
                There is a sense of strength when knowing
                the path of at least some of you ancestors.

                In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
                "lynn" <wintyreeve@...> wrote:

                But being mixed--I feel a need to confront the past, whatever
                it is. I can't just cut off part of my identity--who I am.
                What I can do is shape the life I live
                now, and what I pass on to my kids.
                And the fighter in me is proud to say I am White too
                --even if way back when someone was a slave holder.
                I am going to take that lineage, that history and own it.
                In acknowledging who I am, and acknowledging where I
                came from ...I feel I am taking back my identity,
                and giving my family back our sense of self.
                We are who we are, no longer being controlled by shame or fear.
              • Peter Barrett
                WOW! Is right. Lynn you are quite talented as other post have said. I didn t know you were an author. Your story about your family search I have heard before
                Message 7 of 12 , May 3, 2006
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                  WOW! Is right.

                  Lynn you are quite talented as other post have said.
                  I didn't know you were an author.
                  Your story about your family search I have
                  heard before over my years of research.
                  Although my relatives have somewhat acknowledged our mixture, some
                  at the same time believe that it doesn't matter or affect them.

                  I say our history always matters.

                  I'm an oral tradition storyteller by occupation myself.
                  I will look for a poem that I think all would appreciate on this site.

                  In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
                  "multiracialbookclub" <soaptalk@...> wrote:

                  Agreed! 100%, Peter!

                  In addition, Lynn's poem –- `The Secret River' (found at the
                  link below) -- is still one of the most truthful and powerful
                  essays that I have ever read on the matter of the right to
                  personally-claim and publicly-proclaim one's FULL ancestry.

                  In addition, I also feel that it helps to provide some really
                  interesting insight on why many `Multi'-racial/Mixed-Race
                  people of a given previous generation may have chose
                  to "pass" themselves off as being `mono'-racial and
                  or simply as socio-politically "identifying" as such).

                  Have you had a chance to read `The Secret River' yet?

                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/977
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/992

                  In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
                  "Peter Barrett" <barac1998@> wrote:

                  It is very refreshing that you are
                  taking that approach toward your identity.

                  I know many of my family members don't see it that way.
                  Did you research your family history
                  and find out more about yourself?

                  I knew some things about my family but didn't
                  know where things may have occurred or even what.

                  You do have to look at history right in the face.
                  What has happened, has happened and nothing will change it.
                  If our ancestors could live through it we should
                  certainly be able to own it and talk about.

                  One of my ancestors was owned by her father along with her
                  mother and siblings. They were emancipated upon his death.
                  There is a sense of strength when knowing
                  the path of at least some of you ancestors.

                  In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
                  "lynn" <wintyreeve@> wrote:

                  But being mixed--I feel a need to confront the past, whatever
                  it is. I can't just cut off part of my identity--who I am.
                  What I can do is shape the life I live
                  now, and what I pass on to my kids.
                  And the fighter in me is proud to say I am White too
                  --even if way back when someone was a slave holder.
                  I am going to take that lineage, that history and own it.
                  In acknowledging who I am, and acknowledging where I
                  came from ...I feel I am taking back my identity,
                  and giving my family back our sense of self.
                  We are who we are, no longer being controlled by shame or fear.
                • wintyreeve@aol.com
                  Hello Friends, RE: Did you research your family history and find out more about yourself? In a nutshell, this is what happened to me... My Dad was escaping a
                  Message 8 of 12 , May 3, 2006
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                    Hello Friends,
                     
                    RE: Did you research your family history and find out more about yourself?

                    In a nutshell, this is what happened to me...
                    My Dad was escaping a painful past so he moved
                    away from his family to the middle of nowhere.
                    This town was so of African-Americans living there on one hand (and I knew them all).
                    My Dad never talked about his past, never talked about his family.
                    Then he ran off and left me with a lot of questions.
                    In the meanwhile, I am truly a minority in this town--and through several
                    experiences it is obvious that I am an outsider who will never be accepted.
                    Not that I really cared...because I had such a strong sense of family in me that
                    I felt called to find my missing relatives, and learn our history.
                    Some of my Dad's sibling did get in touch with me, and I was able to connect with them.
                    And when I turned 18 I really began to research my family, gather lost relatives
                    and even travel to the backroads of AL where my family line began.

                    So it was not just research but also a calling. And part of my
                    calling was to remember my family, and write down our stories.

                    The biggest challenge I face is getting through the secrets.
                    It literally feels like a wall has been put up of "Don't Talk About .....".
                    My research has now involved my own journey of self-awareness and healing. I have had
                    to develop the strength to speak the truth, without feeling guilty for telling the secrets.
                    I also have had to heal my past, so I can be a strength and
                    support for other family members. So it has been interesting!
                     
                    I wish you the best on your family search as well :)
                     
                    Blessings, Lynn
                     
                     

                  • multiracialbookclub
                    Yes -- Lynn -- you most definitely have been given a calling ... and also the talent, intelligence and skills to answer that calling !! [:)] The poetry and
                    Message 9 of 12 , May 4, 2006
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                      Yes -- Lynn -- you most definitely have been given 'a calling' ...
                      and also the talent, intelligence and skills to answer that 'calling'!! :)

                      The poetry and prose that you have written is
                      just about some of the best that I've ever seen!!!

                      So please do keep up the great work that you have
                      been doing and, thus, keep remaining a source of
                      encouragement for us all with your quality work!! =D>

                      In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com, wintyreeve@... wrote:
                       
                      Hello Friends,
                       
                      RE: Did you research your family history and find out more about yourself?

                      In a nutshell ... it was not just research but also a calling. And part of
                      my calling was to remember my family, and write down our stories.

                      The biggest challenge I face is getting through the secrets. ...

                      My research has now involved my own journey of self-awareness and healing.
                      I have had to develop the strength to speak the truth ...
                       
                      I wish you the best on your family search as well :)
                       
                      Blessings, Lynn
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