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2822Re: To Inform and Clarify

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  • mulatta_loca
    May 14, 2007
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      I know what you mean. In the U.S. people tend to
      think of 'race' and 'nationality' as the same thing.
      When I tell people that my father is Jamaican
      they usually reply; "Oh, so he's Black."
      In reality, he's Mixed and when I was a kid would
      identify himself as "a good lookin' brown man."



      In Generation-Mixed@yahoogroups.com,
      Sonya Tang <invinciblegirl100@...> wrote:


      Dear Chasity,

      Welcome on board! It's really good to have you here :-)
      I was reading your post, and I understand where you are coming
      from. I'd really like to clarify a few things though.
      There is no such thing as a "Jamaican" or "French" race.
      Basically, most people who live in other countries
      such as those are not of any one homogeneous race.
      They either belong to Caucasian, East Indian,
      Chinese, African, Spanish, or Mixes of these races.
      So when you go to Jamaica, you should expect to find people
      of varying races, such as African, East Indian, Chinese, etc.
      The islands from which I was born and raised are Trinidad and
      Tobago. These islands were colonised by the British a very long
      time ago and throughout time many "races" of people
      of varying nationalities settled on these islands.
      Now that the islands are independent, we have a rich racial unity
      of East Indian, Chinese, African, Spanish, Caucasian, and Mixed
      races, yet our culture is that of Trinidadian and Tobagonian.
      For someone from another country to say that a Trinidadian person
      is expected to "look" a certain way would be entirely wrong.
      This is why I believe that when specifying race,
      it should not be confused with one's nationality.
      Because race and nationality are two entirely different things.
      For example, someone may be born and living in China, yet
      he or she does NOT necessarily have to be of Chinese race.
      Instead, he or she could be of any other
      race, such as East Indian, or Caucasian.
      I hope I was able to enlighten you and others a bit.
      Thank you for sharing your story with us, and always remember that
      God accepts us and loves us no matter how we look on the outside :-)




      kier22_2 <kier22_2@...> wrote:



      Hi Chasity,

      I am a light-skinned "black" girl with a mix of Jamacian, Colombian,
      French, Native American & I also have relatives on Grand Turk Island.
      I am older than you but I can understand how hard
      it is not fitting in in school. I didn't either.
      I went to a High School in NYC that was mostly Hispanic.
      I look Hispanic but I am not & I don't speak Spanish.
      So I looked Hispanic and all of the black kids thought group.
      I can tell you one thing that is a fact.
      Be who you are. This hard time is temporary.
      Once you are out of School it wont matter.
      Keep your head up girl & remember to stay true to who you are.
      contact me at kier22_2@... if you want to talk some more.

      Kier.



      >>>

      Hey I'm Chasity and I'm mainly black and native american.
      I have white, italin, mexican, and jamican
      in me but I mainly am called emoblackgirl.
      I'm emo as you guys hurd from my neck name.
      Im brown skinned with diffrent lengths of hair.
      I go to Pinkneyville and I have a rough time
      there about which race I choose to act like.
      In general I have a bad life. I dont think you
      guys will understand this, being that I'm only 14.
      Well I hope you guys will contact me back.
      chasity.

      <<<
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