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Re: [ISOGG] 2014 International Genetic Genealogy Conference

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  • J. J. (Jim) Logan
    FYI ==================== J. J. (Jim) Logan Logan DNA Project, GenGen-NV, ISOGG, GOONS, CWG/VASSAR
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 25, 2014
      FYI
      ====================
      J. J. (Jim) Logan
      Logan DNA Project, GenGen-NV, ISOGG, GOONS, CWG/VASSAR
      ===================================================================
      On 2/24/2014 1:46 PM, Tim Janzen wrote:
       

                  The Institute for Genetic Genealogy is pleased to announce the 2014 International Genetic Genealogy Conference, which will be held August 15-17 in Washington, DC at the National 4-H Youth Conference Center.  An outstanding group of genetic genealogists and population geneticists have agreed to speak at this conference.  Representatives from all of the major genetic genealogy companies have agreed to give presentations.  Dr. Spencer Wells, who heads the National Geographic Genographic Project, will be the keynote speaker.  We are grateful to these speakers who are willing to share their knowledge with the genetic genealogy community.

                  The main portion of the conference will be held on August 16 and 17.  Family Tree DNA will hold a workshop in the evening on August 15.  Other genetic genealogy companies possibly will also be holding workshops on August 15 during the afternoon.  See www.i4gg.org for details about the conference and to register for it.  The registration fee for the conference will be $85.  Meals and lodging will be available at the conference center but must be purchased at least one month in advance.  For a preliminary conference schedule see http://i4gg.org/conference-schedule.  For descriptions of the presentations and biographical background about the speakers see http://i4gg.org/conference-speakers.  CeCe Moore, my wife Rachel, and I have been making preparations for this conference for the past 6 months.  Angie Bush, Charmaine Riley Holley, and Paul Woodbury helped distribute flyers about the conference and served at the Institute for Genetic Genealogy booth at RootsTech two weeks ago.

      Sincerely,

      Tim Janzen

       

                  A complete list of the speakers and their presentations is as follows:

       

      1.  Ancestry.com representative - Ancestry.com DNA products

      2.  Jim Bartlett - Getting the Most of Your Autosomal DNA Matches and Triangulation , an Essential Tool to Sort out Your Matches and Map Your DNA

      3.  Terry Barton - Surname Project Administration

      4.  Dr. Blaine Bettinger - Using Free Third-party Tools to Analyze Your Autosomal DNA

      5.  Angie Bush - DNA Case Studies

      6.  Rebekah Canada - Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup H

      7.  Shannon Christmas - Identity by Descent: Using DNA to Extend the African-American Pedigree

      8.  Karin Corbeil, Diane Harman-Hoog, and Rob Warthen - Not Just for Adoptees – Methods and Tools for Working with Autosomal DNA from the Team at DNAGedcom.com

      9.  Family Tree DNA representative - FTDNA Products

      10.  Dr. Maurice Gleeson - An Irish Approach to Autosomal DNA Matches

      11.  Katherine Hope-Borges - ISOGG

      12.  Bill Hurst - Mitochondrial DNA Focusing on Haplogroup K

      13.  Dr. Tim Janzen - Using Chromosome Mapping to Help Trace Your Family Tree

      14.  Dr. Kathy Johnston - From X Segments to Success Stories: The Use of the X Chromosome in Genetic Genealogy

      15.  Thomas Krahn - I've Received my Y Chromosome Sequencing Results - What Now?

      16.  Dr. Doug McDonald - Understanding Autosomal Biogeographical Ancestry Results

      17.  23andMe representative - 23andMe Features

      18.  CeCe Moore - The Four Types of DNA Used in Genetic Genealogy

      19.  Dr.  Ken Nordtvedt - Y Haplogroup I — Very Early Europeans?

      20.  Dr. Ugo Perego - Native American Ancestry through DNA Analysis

      21.  Dr. David Pike- The Use of Phasing in Genetic Genealogy

      22.  Bonnie Schrack - Y chromosome Haplogroups A and B

      23.  Larry Vick - Using Y-DNA to Reconstruct a Patrilineal Tree

      24.  Debbie Parker Wayne- Mitochondrial DNA: Tools and Techniques for Genealogy

      25.  Dr. Spencer Wells - the Genographic Project

      26.  Dr. Jim Wilson- Chromo 2 test and Y chromosome research

       


    • Bill Howard
      You may find this email interesting. It comes from Gail Riddell in New Zealand with whom I am in occasional Skype touch. She posted this in reply to a question
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 26, 2014
        You may find this email interesting. It comes from Gail Riddell in New Zealand with whom I am in occasional Skype touch. She posted this in reply to a question posed on the genealogy-dna@... forum
        - Bye from Bill Howard

        =============================================
        23andMe are foremost an atDNA testing company.
        This means they consider the Chromosomes 1*22 plus locate certain SNPs on the X chromosome plus the Y Chromosome and the mitochondria (mtDNA) which is the "energy structure" surrounding the gene containing the chromosomes.  (Please note that I am using "layman's language" here.)

        Such a test is perfect if you tested for health and for cousins testing but 23andMe are not the Y Chromosome nor the mtDNA testing experts.
        For this, you need to test with Family Tree DNA which we affectionately label as FTDNA.   www.familytreedna.com

        You can get a "3rd party transfer" of your 23andMe results for US$69.00, but be aware these will be akin to the FTDNA procedure under the 'Family Finder'  marketing label.  BUT, such a transfer cannot occur at this time if you have tested under what is sometimes referred to as the 4th version chip via 23andMe.  FTDNA needs it to be the 3rd version else you need to begin again with FTDNA.

        Once in the FTDNA system, you can then order (for a price) the Y-DNA tests of your choice (as an example).  This will give you much more scope for the direct male line than is offered by 23andMe.  Plus, you will have two large "playgrounds" in which you may find all sorts of matches.  What you choose to test is entirely dependent on what connections you wish to learn.

        Merely as an example, say you have a specific surname that you believe you belong to and which you wish to further research.  Then, after being a part of the FTDNA family, you can join that surname project and go further in such of your studies as you desire.  

        All existing FTDNA projects have Administrators who are volunteers but who have undertaken to aid those members who join, in furthering their understanding and their connections via genetic genealogy.

        There are also Haplogroup Projects and Geographic Projects - again run by volunteers.  There are many thousands from which you can select.

        I have a large group of E1b1b1 men in just one of my Surname projects who all appear to be E- V13+, although only about 1/3  have actually tested that SNP (I comment thus because of the strong Y-STR connections all these men have with each other  [STR = Short Tandem Repeats of the nucleotide sequences of A,C, T, G  and which form a basis of the Y chromosome marker testing for genealogical purposes] ).

        Are they of Italian extraction?  I have no idea as I have not "chased" any of them for deeper SNP testing which would be necessary to begin to contemplate such a result.  We are all too busy chasing the genealogical results which at least have a chance to be proven unlike SNPs of possibly many thousands of years ago.

        One final comment in this response is that while I personally adore dealing with autosomal results, any tester of same needs to be aware that although theoretically two siblings are supposed to inherit 50% of their parental chromosomes, in reality it frequently does not work like that.  This is because one sibling may inherit huge chunks from one parent but lesser from another parent, we actually NEED a sibling or two to also test to get a strong indication.  I say this from years of experience with testers and via my own family.  Just as an example, my son has inherited a chunk of a chromosome with his 7th cousin on my paternal side (my 6th cousin), but I have NOT, yet my brother did!  Neither did my sister but we are 100% full siblings meaning their mother and father are also mine. (Boo hoo).

        Happy to aid further if others do not chime in with better or more helpful comments.  Just ask.

        Gail Riddell
      • Jim Bartlett
        Bill Two comments: 1. When you transfer results (a copy of the data), you do not transfer the DNA sample. So for further testing at FTDNA, you need to order a
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 26, 2014
          Bill

          Two comments:

          1. When you transfer results (a copy of the data), you do not transfer the DNA sample. So for further testing at FTDNA, you need to order a kit and provide the DNA sample. You can do this with or without a transfer from 23andMe. 

          2. Children always get exactly 50% of their atDNA from each parent. 50 + 50 = 100%, and we all need, and get, 100%. Children get one each of all 22 autosomes from each parent - that is 50%. What Gail might be seeing is the amount of overlap between siblings. Usually siblings share about 50%, but that can vary. It can vary a lot on each chromosome, but usually averages out around 50% over all 22 autosomes. Where 1 child has 1/2 of a parents atDNA, 2 children will collectively cover about 3/4 of their parents atDNA, 3 children about 7/8, etc. So some of the parent's atDNA is always lost forever. Also the contribution from grandparents is roughly 50% of the respective parent's contribution (which is exactly 50% from parents), but the grandparent's contributions can vary some, and it is not unusual to find more atDNA from one grandparent. This shift (or drift) from the average can become more pronounced in further generations, however, at each generational level all the nGreat grandparent's contributions will add up to 100% (n being 8, 16, 32, etc)

          Bill, I'm not at my PC, and don't have Gail's email handy. Please feel free to forward this to her. I'll see if I can post it to the other forum, too. 

          Jim - Sent from my iPhone - FaceTime!

          On Feb 26, 2014, at 8:12 AM, Bill Howard <weh8@...> wrote:

          You may find this email interesting. It comes from Gail Riddell in New Zealand with whom I am in occasional Skype touch. She posted this in reply to a question posed on the genealogy-dna@... forum
          - Bye from Bill Howard

          =============================================
          23andMe are foremost an atDNA testing company.
          This means they consider the Chromosomes 1*22 plus locate certain SNPs on the X chromosome plus the Y Chromosome and the mitochondria (mtDNA) which is the "energy structure" surrounding the gene containing the chromosomes.  (Please note that I am using "layman's language" here.)

          Such a test is perfect if you tested for health and for cousins testing but 23andMe are not the Y Chromosome nor the mtDNA testing experts.
          For this, you need to test with Family Tree DNA which we affectionately label as FTDNA.   www.familytreedna.com

          You can get a "3rd party transfer" of your 23andMe results for US$69.00, but be aware these will be akin to the FTDNA procedure under the 'Family Finder'  marketing label.  BUT, such a transfer cannot occur at this time if you have tested under what is sometimes referred to as the 4th version chip via 23andMe.  FTDNA needs it to be the 3rd version else you need to begin again with FTDNA.

          Once in the FTDNA system, you can then order (for a price) the Y-DNA tests of your choice (as an example).  This will give you much more scope for the direct male line than is offered by 23andMe.  Plus, you will have two large "playgrounds" in which you may find all sorts of matches.  What you choose to test is entirely dependent on what connections you wish to learn.

          Merely as an example, say you have a specific surname that you believe you belong to and which you wish to further research  Then, after being a part of the FTDNA family, you can join that surname project and go further in such of your studies as you desire.  

          All existing FTDNA projects have Administrators who are volunteers but who have undertaken to aid those members who join, in furthering their understanding and their connections via genetic genealogy.

          There are also Haplogroup Projects and Geographic Projects - again run by volunteers.  There are many thousands from which you can select.

          I have a large group of E1b1b1 men in just one of my Surname projects who all appear to be E- V13+, although only about 1/3  have actually tested that SNP (I comment thus because of the strong Y-STR connections all these men have with each other  [STR = Short Tandem Repeats of the nucleotide sequences of A,C, T, G  and which form a basis of the Y chromosome marker testing for genealogical purposes] ).

          Are they of Italian extraction?  I have no idea as I have not "chased" any of them for deeper SNP testing which would be necessary to begin to contemplate such a result.  We are all too busy chasing the genealogical results which at least have a chance to be proven unlike SNPs of possibly many thousands of years ago.

          One final comment in this response is that while I personally adore dealing with autosomal results, any tester of same needs to be aware that although theoretically two siblings are supposed to inherit 50% of their parental chromosomes, in reality it frequently does not work like that.  This is because one sibling may inherit huge chunks from one parent but lesser from another parent, we actually NEED a sibling or two to also test to get a strong indication.  I say this from years of experience with testers and via my own family.  Just as an example, my son has inherited a chunk of a chromosome with his 7th cousin on my paternal side (my 6th cousin), but I have NOT, yet my brother did!  Neither did my sister but we are 100% full siblings meaning their mother and father are also mine. (Boo hoo).

          Happy to aid further if others do not chime in with better or more helpful comments.  Just ask.

          Gail Riddell
        • sidneysachs@juno.com
          Jim, You are right and wrong about the amount of common dna from each parent, grandparent, etc. You % are right. However, you are wrong because it would be
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 26, 2014
            Jim,

            You are right and wrong about the amount of common dna from each parent, grandparent, etc. You % are right. However, you are wrong because it would be higher because both SNPs in any location could be the same from each parents, thus making the % higher. :-)

            Do you know rather you are going to the meeting next Wednesday? I think you would be the best in explaining the differ companies since you used all three.

            Sidney


            ____________________________________________________________
            Sexy Diet Secret of Stars
            Celebrity Doctor Reveals 1 Easy Trick to Lasting Fat Loss.
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          • Jim Bartlett
            Sidney I still think I m right - I m talking about all your atDNA - every base pair on on all 44 atDNA chromosomes. SNPs are just a sampling of that DNA. I ll
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 26, 2014
              Sidney

              I still think I'm right - I'm talking about all your atDNA - every base pair on on all 44 atDNA chromosomes. SNPs are just a sampling of that DNA.

              I'll make it if I can.

              Jim - Sent from my iPhone - FaceTime!

              > On Feb 26, 2014, at 8:42 PM, "sidneysachs@..." <sidneysachs@...> wrote:
              >
              > Jim,
              >
              > You are right and wrong about the amount of common dna from each parent, grandparent, etc. You % are right. However, you are wrong because it would be higher because both SNPs in any location could be the same from each parents, thus making the % higher. :-)
              >
              > Do you know rather you are going to the meeting next Wednesday? I think you would be the best in explaining the differ companies since you used all three.
              >
              > Sidney
              >
              >
              > ____________________________________________________________
              > Sexy Diet Secret of Stars
              > Celebrity Doctor Reveals 1 Easy Trick to Lasting Fat Loss.
              > http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/530e984257e2e18420a3est02vuc
              >
              >
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