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A movie (Open with Quick Time Player) that shows the relationships between the RCC matrix of Logan Haplotypes and a dated Y-DNA Logan Phylogenetic tree

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  • Bill Howard
    I finally got enough memory in my Dropbox to put a movie onto that site. You can access it by going to the URL below and either clicking it or pasting it into
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 11, 2013
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      I finally got enough memory in my Dropbox to put a movie onto that site. You can access it by going to the URL below and either clicking it or pasting it into your browser. It will open using Quick Time Player, or perhaps some other application that can present a movie. No need to download it. It will play right from Dropbox. The movie consists of a set of slides with accompanying narration from slide to slide.

      The movie is based on a set of Logan haplotypes that Jim Logan sent me a couple of years ago. He and I have been working together to tighten and collapse the haplotype set, but the movie is based on an earlier set of haplotypes, not the most recent one we have been working on. It conclusions regarding time will be very little different now than the times that were derived then. Thanks to Jim for sending me the data.

      It is a 15 minute series of slides with narration that I made about two years ago. 

      This is experimental.

      Please tell me if you can run the movie it or tell me if you had any trouble accessing it.

      It presents a time-sliced RCC matrix of Logan surname clusters and shows how the population of the various clusters evolves in time. At the end, a dated phylogenetic tree is presented that shows the clusters in the matrix. Both the changing matrix and the tree show how surname clusters evolve with time, going back 5 thousand years ago, with historical events that took place in those years presented as the clusters and interclusters evolve. The intercluster regions contain data for individuals who are members of one cluster compared to individuals who are members of another cluster. The intercluster region is important when we try to estimate the time when the most recent common ancestor between two clusters lived. Both the matrix and the tree are derived from the same set of haplotypes. 
      Both the matrix evolution and the tree clearly show the times when the Logan surname clusters had their most recent common ancestor between each pair of clusters, based on the DNA haplotypes of testees that are paired between sets of clusters. This same approach can be used to show the evolution of surnames, haplogroups and SNPs as long as the data set that is inputted to the program are not a mixture of different types of data. Even if they are, the times will still be valid as long as 37-marker haplotypes are used. That is because the RCC time scale is calibrated with over 100 pedigrees using 37-marker haplotypes. We can now do a tree and its associated matrix using marker strings of different lengths (e.g., with 25, 67, and 111 markers in the string) as long as they all have the same number of markers in the string. Fred Schwab produced the code that has been crucial to the effort where the junction points in the tree indicate the times when crucial mutations took place that led to the different clusters on the tree.

      I am still learning to do this, so comments and suggestions are in order.
    • Kleinjwsh
      Bill, I had no trouble accessing this movie and it is very well done. I do hope this is successful in being intellectually used to help with the common
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 14, 2013
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        Bill, I had no trouble accessing this movie and it is very well done.  I do hope this is successful in being intellectually used to help with the common ancestor as one struggles to use the shared DNA data provided.  Thanks for sharing this with the group.  Susan Klein
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Bill Howard <weh8@...>
        To: gengen-nv <gengen-nv@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Mon, Nov 11, 2013 9:08 pm
        Subject: [GenGen-NV] A movie (Open with Quick Time Player) that shows the relationships between the RCC matrix of Logan Haplotypes and a dated Y-DNA Logan Phylogenetic tree

         
        I finally got enough memory in my Dropbox to put a movie onto that site. You can access it by going to the URL below and either clicking it or pasting it into your browser. It will open using Quick Time Player, or perhaps some other application that can present a movie. No need to download it. It will play right from Dropbox. The movie consists of a set of slides with accompanying narration from slide to slide.

        The movie is based on a set of Logan haplotypes that Jim Logan sent me a couple of years ago. He and I have been working together to tighten and collapse the haplotype set, but the movie is based on an earlier set of haplotypes, not the most recent one we have been working on. It conclusions regarding time will be very little different now than the times that were derived then. Thanks to Jim for sending me the data.

        It is a 15 minute series of slides with narration that I made about two years ago. 

        This is experimental.

        Please tell me if you can run the movie it or tell me if you had any trouble accessing it.

        It presents a time-sliced RCC matrix of Logan surname clusters and shows how the population of the various clusters evolves in time. At the end, a dated phylogenetic tree is presented that shows the clusters in the matrix. Both the changing matrix and the tree show how surname clusters evolve with time, going back 5 thousand years ago, with historical events that took place in those years presented as the clusters and interclusters evolve. The intercluster regions contain data for individuals who are members of one cluster compared to individuals who are members of another cluster. The intercluster region is important when we try to estimate the time when the most recent common ancestor between two clusters lived. Both the matrix and the tree are derived from the same set of haplotypes. 
        Both the matrix evol ution and the tree clearly show the times when the Logan surname clusters had their most recent common ancestor between each pair of clusters, based on the DNA haplotypes of testees that are paired between sets of clusters. This same approach can be used to show the evolution of surnames, haplogroups and SNPs as long as the data set that is inputted to the program are not a mixture of different types of data. Even if they are, the times will still be valid as long as 37-marker haplotypes are used. That is because the RCC time scale is calibrated with over 100 pedigrees using 37-marker haplotypes. We can now do a tree and its associated matrix using marker strings of different lengths (e.g., with 25, 67, and 111 markers in the string) as long as they all have the same number of markers in the string. Fred Schwab produced the code that has been crucial to the effort where the junction points in the tree indicate the times when crucial mutations took place that led to the diffe rent clusters on the tree.

        I am still learning to do this, so comments and suggestions are in order.
      • Bill Howard
        Thank you Susan. I may be sending it out more widely in another few days and then gird my loins in anticipation of all the arrows that may be shot at me! --
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 14, 2013
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          Thank you Susan. I may be sending it out more widely in another few days and then gird my loins in anticipation of all the arrows that may be shot at me!
          -- Bye from Bill



          Sent from Bill Howard's iPad


          On Nov 14, 2013, at 20:48, Kleinjwsh <kleinjwsh@...> wrote:

           

          Bill, I had no trouble accessing this movie and it is very well done.  I do hope this is successful in being intellectually used to help with the common ancestor as one struggles to use the shared DNA data provided.  Thanks for sharing this with the group.  Susan Klein

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Bill Howard <weh8@...>
          To: gengen-nv <gengen-nv@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Mon, Nov 11, 2013 9:08 pm
          Subject: [GenGen-NV] A movie (Open with Quick Time Player) that shows the relationships between the RCC matrix of Logan Haplotypes and a dated Y-DNA Logan Phylogenetic tree

           
          I finally got enough memory in my Dropbox to put a movie onto that site. You can access it by going to the URL below and either clicking it or pasting it into your browser. It will open using Quick Time Player, or perhaps some other application that can present a movie. No need to download it. It will play right from Dropbox. The movie consists of a set of slides with accompanying narration from slide to slide.

          The movie is based on a set of Logan haplotypes that Jim Logan sent me a couple of years ago. He and I have been working together to tighten and collapse the haplotype set, but the movie is based on an earlier set of haplotypes, not the most recent one we have been working on. It conclusions regarding time will be very little different now than the times that were derived then. Thanks to Jim for sending me the data.

          It is a 15 minute series of slides with narration that I made about two years ago. 

          This is experimental.

          Please tell me if you can run the movie it or tell me if you had any trouble accessing it.

          It presents a time-sliced RCC matrix of Logan surname clusters and shows how the population of the various clusters evolves in time. At the end, a dated phylogenetic tree is presented that shows the clusters in the matrix. Both the changing matrix and the tree show how surname clusters evolve with time, going back 5 thousand years ago, with historical events that took place in those years presented as the clusters and interclusters evolve. The intercluster regions contain data for individuals who are members of one cluster compared to individuals who are members of another cluster. The intercluster region is important when we try to estimate the time when the most recent common ancestor between two clusters lived. Both the matrix and the tree are derived from the same set of haplotypes. 
          Both the matrix evol ution and the tree clearly show the times when the Logan surname clusters had their most recent common ancestor between each pair of clusters, based on the DNA haplotypes of testees that are paired between sets of clusters. This same approach can be used to show the evolution of surnames, haplogroups and SNPs as long as the data set that is inputted to the program are not a mixture of different types of data. Even if they are, the times will still be valid as long as 37-marker haplotypes are used. That is because the RCC time scale is calibrated with over 100 pedigrees using 37-marker haplotypes. We can now do a tree and its associated matrix using marker strings of different lengths (e.g., with 25, 67, and 111 markers in the string) as long as they all have the same number of markers in the string. Fred Schwab produced the code that has been crucial to the effort where the junction points in the tree indicate the times when crucial mutations took place that led to the diffe rent clusters on the tree.

          I am still learning to do this, so comments and suggestions are in order.

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