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SRAM Automatix

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  • aarons_bicycle_repair
    Hello, I cannot find an exploded diagram for the Automatix. Can one of Ya ll find one for me and post the URL? I have overhauled my first one (not many in
    Message 1 of 10 , May 6, 2014
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      Hello,


      I cannot find an exploded diagram for the Automatix.


      Can one of Ya'll find one for me and post the URL?


      I have overhauled my first one (not many in hilly Seattle) and it is quite a neat hub.  The customer wore out the coaster pads/shoes.  The hub locked up due to galling of the pads and no grease.  I also did the spring adjustment (note I do not "modifiy" hubs because of liability but bending the spring is akin to adjusting a cantilever brake that does not have centering screws, so I think it is OK).  The hub now shifts later at a higher speed.  His complaint was it shifted too soon.  


       I have a picture of all the guts laid out and want to include a diagram and will post it on my website.




      -- 


      Sincerely,
      Aaron Goss  
      President & Master Mechanic

      Aaron's Bicycle Repair, Inc.
      9988 15th AVE SW, Suite E
      Seattle, WA   98146

      (206) 938-9795  

      RideYourBike.com
      Aaron's Bicycle Repair

       


    • John Allen
      A hub which is sensitive only to RPM will shift at a higher road speed in a larger wheel. What size wheel was the hub in, and did you get an idea of your
      Message 2 of 10 , May 7, 2014
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        A hub which is sensitive only to RPM will shift at a higher road
        speed in a larger wheel. What size wheel was the hub in, and did you
        get an idea of your customer's preferred cadence?

        This raises interesting issues pointing the way to more sophisticated
        automatic shifting. Due to the variation of torque around the pedal
        stroke, a hub which is also sensitive to pedaling effort would need a
        memory -- and so probably either hydraulic control (like classic
        automotive automatic transmissions) or electronic control (like
        modern ones). The hub would have to shift at lower RPM with higher
        effort to as to allow standing on the pedals, and shift at the dead
        centers to make shifting as smooth as possible. I'm not sure whether
        automatic shifting could ever properly reflect the preferences of a
        skillful cyclist. Trying to make it do that would be an interesting
        experiment.

        At 08:25 PM 5/6/2014, aaron@... wrote:
        >
        >
        >Hello,
        >
        >
        >I cannot find an exploded diagram for the Automatix.
        >
        >
        >Can one of Ya'll find one for me and post the URL?
        >
        >
        >I have overhauled my first one (not many in hilly Seattle) and it is
        >quite a neat hub. The customer wore out the coaster
        >pads/shoes. The hub locked up due to galling of the pads and no
        >grease. I also did the spring adjustment (note I do not "modifiy"
        >hubs because of liability but bending the spring is akin to
        >adjusting a cantilever brake that does not have centering screws, so
        >I think it is OK). The hub now shifts later at a higher speed. His
        >complaint was it shifted too soon.
        >
        >
        > I have a picture of all the guts laid out and want to include a
        > diagram and will post it on my website.

        John S. Allen

        Technical Writer/Editor, http://sheldonbrown.com

        League Cycling Instructor #77-C
        Member, National Committee on Uniform Traffic Control Devices Bicycle
        Technical Committee.

        jsallen *at* bikexprt.com
        http://bikexprt.com
        http://john-s-allen.com/blog
        http://bostonbiker.org/streetsmarts
      • aarons_bicycle_repair
        A 20 Dahon. The customer was very pleased with the adjustment I made to the shift spring. Cadence? Skillfull Cyclist? The dude was just a regular guy riding
        Message 3 of 10 , May 9, 2014
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          A 20" Dahon.
          The customer was very pleased with the adjustment I made to the shift spring. 

          Cadence?  Skillfull Cyclist?

          The dude was just a regular guy riding a bike and wanted the low gear to stay engaged longer!

          We have GOT to stop calling folks cyclists!  No regular person identifies with that.  No normal on the street Joe wants to dress funny to ride a bike.  If we change the way we describe people on bikes, then we can encourage more people to pick up the wheel!
        • Ince, Wilbur
          When everyone rides, we can drop cyclist. Then it will be moot. Until then we have to encourage everyone to enjoy the personal choice to ride. Wilbur Ince On
          Message 4 of 10 , May 9, 2014
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            When everyone rides, we can drop cyclist.  Then it will be moot.  Until then we have to encourage everyone to enjoy the personal choice to ride.  

            Wilbur Ince


            On Fri, May 9, 2014 at 2:26 PM, aaron@... [Geared_hub_bikes] <Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
             

            A 20" Dahon.

            The customer was very pleased with the adjustment I made to the shift spring. 

            Cadence?  Skillfull Cyclist?

            The dude was just a regular guy riding a bike and wanted the low gear to stay engaged longer!

            We have GOT to stop calling folks cyclists!  No regular person identifies with that.  No normal on the street Joe wants to dress funny to ride a bike.  If we change the way we describe people on bikes, then we can encourage more people to pick up the wheel!


          • hubmanholland
            Cyclist (noun) A person who rides a cycle, especially a bicycle, or who habitually engages in cycling. If you can t call people who ride a bicycle a cyclist,
            Message 5 of 10 , May 13, 2014
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              Cyclist (noun)
              A person who rides a cycle, especially a bicycle, or who habitually engages in cycling.

              If you can't call people who ride a bicycle a cyclist, then what do you call them? Does the word cyclist have some extra meaning in the USA? Where I come from (the UK), we only have one word: a cyclist. If one then dresses up in tight shiny clothes and sits on a razor blade saddle with a really expensive carbon frame and gossamer tyres, we have a perfect word for that: a cyclist.

              Please excuse the sarcasm, it's horribly British of me and I should just grow up.

              Also, whilst we're on this topic, is there a verb in the US 'to bike'? Example: I like to bike to work. I now live in the Netherlands and I hear it a lot amongst Dutch people speaking English, but it's a new word for me. In the UK one either rides a bike (to work) or cycles (to work).

              Simon
            • Keith Barlow
              I m in the UK, and I recognise the verb to bike as meaning to send something quickly by motorcycle courier. If I were in London, it may be that it would also
              Message 6 of 10 , May 13, 2014
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                I'm in the UK, and I recognise the verb "to bike" as meaning to send something quickly by motorcycle courier. If I were in London, it may be that it would also apply to having something sent via bicycle courier, but I haven't worked there nor have I heard it used in that way.

                On 13 May 2014, at 21:08, "hubstripping@... [Geared_hub_bikes]" <Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                Cyclist (noun)
                A person who rides a cycle, especially a bicycle, or who habitually engages in cycling.

                If you can't call people who ride a bicycle a cyclist, then what do you call them? Does the word cyclist have some extra meaning in the USA? Where I come from (the UK), we only have one word: a cyclist. If one then dresses up in tight shiny clothes and sits on a razor blade saddle with a really expensive carbon frame and gossamer tyres, we have a perfect word for that: a cyclist.

                Please excuse the sarcasm, it's horribly British of me and I should just grow up.

                Also, whilst we're on this topic, is there a verb in the US 'to bike'? Example: I like to bike to work. I now live in the Netherlands and I hear it a lot amongst Dutch people speaking English, but it's a new word for me. In the UK one either rides a bike (to work) or cycles (to work).

                Simon
              • aarons_bicycle_repair
                In the USA, it is my experience that those not familiar with the bike world do not necessarily know the word cyclist . If they do hear it they think of a
                Message 7 of 10 , May 15, 2014
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                  In the USA, it is my experience that those not familiar with "the bike world" do not necessarily know the word "cyclist".  If they do hear it they think of a spandex-clad-Lance Armstrong-type-racer-dude.  (note: men and women are hard to tell apart when all "kitted-up".  The term "cyclist" in America is an elitist term and means "enthusiast or racer type on a road bike". That is my take on it.  My shop is in the most demographically diverse neighborhood in the USA.  White Center, Washington.  We get all types in here from the homeless person or DUI "cyclist" to the kitted-alien-helmeted "cyclist".

                  We prefer the term biker or bicyclist.

                  I know I am a bi-cyclist because I ride both road and mountain.  That is the only types of bike, right?

                  And if you race for an online company, does that make you an E-racer?

                  Back on topic:

                  Anyone found an exploded diagram for the Automatix?

                  The guys at SRAM were clueless, as usual.  Hello folks in Germany......?
                • hubmanholland
                  Aaron, Thanks for your reply. I think that I understand your original comment better now, all except one point: you said those not familiar with the bike
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 16, 2014
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                    Aaron,
                    Thanks for your reply. I think that I understand your original comment better now, all except one point: you said 'those not familiar with "the bike world"'. I've never had the chance to visit the USA, but doesn't every kid grow up with their own bicycle?
                    Simon
                  • brucemetras
                    Other than the differences in the coaster brake, the Sachs A2110 hub is basically the same ... there are diagrams at hubstripping as well as Jens site on
                    Message 9 of 10 , May 16, 2014
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                      Other than the differences in the coaster brake, the Sachs A2110 hub is basically the same ... there are diagrams at hubstripping as well as Jens' site on Sachs torpedo hubs.

                      F&S / Torpedo AUTOMATIC

                       



                      torpedo coasterbrake, fichtel and sachs parts

                       



                    • John Allen
                      These hubs are covered in Sutherland s Handbook of coaster Brake and Internal Gear Hubs, on sheldonbrown.com.-- http://sheldonbrown.com/sutherland.html ...
                      Message 10 of 10 , May 16, 2014
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                        These hubs are covered in Sutherland's Handbook of coaster Brake and Internal Gear Hubs, on sheldonbrown.com.-- http://sheldonbrown.com/sutherland.html

                        At 11:07 AM 5/16/2014, brucemetras@... [Geared_hub_bikes] wrote:
                         

                        Other than the differences in the coaster brake, the Sachs A2110 hub is basically the same ... there are diagrams at hubstripping as well as Jens' site on Sachs torpedo hubs.

                        F&S / Torpedo AUTOMATIC
                        F&S / Torpedo AUTOMATIC
                        Fichtel & Sachs Torpedo AUTOMATIC (A 2110) General: When the AUTOMATIC hub was developed the DUOMATIC hub was already on the market. This was the Wi...

                        John S. Allen

                        Technical Writer/Editor,  http://sheldonbrown.com

                        League Cycling Instructor #77-C

                        jsallen *at* bikexprt.com
                        http://bikexprt.com
                        http://john-s-allen.com/blog
                        http://bostonbiker.org/streetsmarts

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