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Re: New to this hub business and in need of help.

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  • Sophiep
    That s an amazing resource there. That chart showed me exactly what I wanted to know. I did the exchange and rode the bike a good 10km to and it worked
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 3, 2013
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      That's an amazing resource there. That chart showed me exactly what I wanted to know. I did the exchange and rode the bike a good 10km to and it worked flawlessly. Obviously I can't tell how it compared performance wise to an original 8R30 because it was replacing a broken one.

      It probably was a no-brainer to do an oil bath but brand new it looked quite alright. although the greasing was sparse to begin with. And it looked like your general purpose lithium grease. I took the unit and let it steep in some GL5 85w90 gear oil for an hour. Worked the mechanisms gears. Then greased it up liberally with some CV axle grease I had left over and put her back together. I used some SRS2000 grease just under the outer cover to discourage water entry. I also wound hockey tap around to seal the cover. Hopefully that will help.

      For those that have rebuilt these, I have another question. The bearing preload, was suggested to be 3nm, or was it 5nm. That's not alot and I don't have a torque wrench that goes that low. So I tightened until there was no discernible play then backed it off until I could barely feel some play. There is no wobble and it feels smooth without any resistance. I was told that this would be adequate and not cause any issues. Is there another way of doing it and will this method suffice?

      Sorry for the novel, I'm so glad I have a bike to ride now. Can't wait to ride into work come monday!
    • Zack B
      My personal method of adjusting cone tension on a nexus/alfine hub: Place the (fully assembled) wheel in a vice with the brake/locknut side facing up. Spin the
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 4, 2013
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        My personal method of adjusting cone tension on a nexus/alfine hub:

        Place the (fully assembled) wheel in a vice with the brake/locknut side facing up.

        Spin the wheel and place your finger on the cog while it is freewheeling.

        Paying attention to the vibrations of the mechanism coming through the cog, tighten the cone with your other hand until you start to detect drag/roughness in the mechanism through the cog.

        The point you want to adjust to is the maximum smoothness/least drag without significant play in the bearings.

        You can be a little on the loose side with the bearings because the axle nuts will tighten them up when you install the wheel on the bike, but as the cone/locknut will loosen over time It is a good idea to err (a little) on the side of tight rather than loose. Overtight adjustment will cause premature wear on the bearings and can also cause the return spring to bind.



        On Sat, Aug 3, 2013 at 7:21 PM, Sophiep <tanhtrantl@...> wrote:
         



        That's an amazing resource there. That chart showed me exactly what I wanted to know. I did the exchange and rode the bike a good 10km to and it worked flawlessly. Obviously I can't tell how it compared performance wise to an original 8R30 because it was replacing a broken one.

        It probably was a no-brainer to do an oil bath but brand new it looked quite alright. although the greasing was sparse to begin with. And it looked like your general purpose lithium grease. I took the unit and let it steep in some GL5 85w90 gear oil for an hour. Worked the mechanisms gears. Then greased it up liberally with some CV axle grease I had left over and put her back together. I used some SRS2000 grease just under the outer cover to discourage water entry. I also wound hockey tap around to seal the cover. Hopefully that will help.

        For those that have rebuilt these, I have another question. The bearing preload, was suggested to be 3nm, or was it 5nm. That's not alot and I don't have a torque wrench that goes that low. So I tightened until there was no discernible play then backed it off until I could barely feel some play. There is no wobble and it feels smooth without any resistance. I was told that this would be adequate and not cause any issues. Is there another way of doing it and will this method suffice?

        Sorry for the novel, I'm so glad I have a bike to ride now. Can't wait to ride into work come monday!




        --
        -Zack
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