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Some Bike History

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  • rons_hobbies
    100ème Tour de France, 100 vélos, 100 champions... http://velosvintage.over-blog.com/article-100eme-tour-de-france-100-velos-116479381.html Quick review
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 24 10:13 AM
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      100ème Tour de France, 100 vélos, 100 champions...

      http://velosvintage.over-blog.com/article-100eme-tour-de-france-100-velos-116479381.html

      Quick review shows the first rear derailleur 1939. Am I missing something?

      Ron
    • Rich W
      The derailleur dates back much further but was not allowed in the TDF until quite late. The original organizer was very conservative and forbade the use of
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 24 10:57 AM
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        The derailleur dates back much further but was not allowed in the TDF until quite late. The original organizer was very conservative and forbade the use of any gear changing from about WWI until the time you mentioned. IIRC he died and the new organizer finaly allowed gear changing mechanisms for the professional riders. In the 20s there was also a tourist class that allowed gearing changer use but the pro riders could not use it other than flipping rear wheels for two speeds. Yhe tourist class is pretty much ignored by TDF history.

        If interested in bicycle drivetrain developments get a copy of "The Dancing Chain" by Frank Berto, third or fourth edition. The most thorough book available on bicycle drivetrain development. Not cheap but the only such history available and quite thorough. Available through Amazon at a discount. This has been recommended in the past.

        http://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Chain-History-Development-Derailleur/dp/1892495694/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1372096139&sr=1-2

        http://tinyurl.com/kotbl4j

        Rich Wood


        --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "rons_hobbies" <peter.pilot@...> wrote:
        >
        > 100ème Tour de France, 100 vélos, 100 champions...
        >
        > http://velosvintage.over-blog.com/article-100eme-tour-de-france-100-velos-116479381.html
        >
        > Quick review shows the first rear derailleur 1939. Am I missing something?
        >
        > Ron
        >
      • bikealfa
        Despite the fact that the derailleur is basically a french invention, the Tour-de-France mandated fixed gear bikes for a long time. Mid-1930s is what I
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 24 11:36 AM
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          Despite the fact that the derailleur is basically a french invention, the Tour-de-France mandated fixed gear bikes for a long time. Mid-1930s is what I remember. Campagnolo invented the quick release (and a fork for moving chains and a cogged dropout) so you could switch fixed gear gears while riding.

          The story I remember is that the organizers allowed derailleurs because the tourist spectators could watch the race, remount their own bikes, pass the racers and watch the same stage at a later spot, which annoyed the racers.

          The original TdF organizer believed in suffering.

          Michael Wilson

          --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "rons_hobbies" <peter.pilot@...> wrote:
          >
          > 100ème Tour de France, 100 vélos, 100 champions...
          >
          > http://velosvintage.over-blog.com/article-100eme-tour-de-france-100-velos-116479381.html
          >
          > Quick review shows the first rear derailleur 1939. Am I missing something?
          >
          > Ron
          >
        • bcssp5
          I m curious: When did the last hub-geared bike compete in the Tour? And, putting aside how competitive a rider would (or could) be with one, are hub gears
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 24 7:43 PM
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            I'm curious: When did the last hub-geared bike compete in the Tour? And, putting aside how competitive a rider would (or could) be with one, are hub gears legal to use now?

            --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "bikealfa" <mtwils@...> wrote:
            >
            > Despite the fact that the derailleur is basically a french invention, the Tour-de-France mandated fixed gear bikes for a long time. Mid-1930s is what I remember. Campagnolo invented the quick release (and a fork for moving chains and a cogged dropout) so you could switch fixed gear gears while riding.
            >
            > The story I remember is that the organizers allowed derailleurs because the tourist spectators could watch the race, remount their own bikes, pass the racers and watch the same stage at a later spot, which annoyed the racers.
            >
            > The original TdF organizer believed in suffering.
            >
            > Michael Wilson
            >
            > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "rons_hobbies" <peter.pilot@> wrote:
            > >
            > > 100ème Tour de France, 100 vélos, 100 champions...
            > >
            > > http://velosvintage.over-blog.com/article-100eme-tour-de-france-100-velos-116479381.html
            > >
            > > Quick review shows the first rear derailleur 1939. Am I missing something?
            > >
            > > Ron
            > >
            >
          • pj
            Derailleurs first re-appeared in the Tour of France in 1937, as can be seen in the OP s linked pictures. This was the last significant race to allow their
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 25 6:52 AM
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              Derailleurs first re-appeared in the Tour of France in 1937, as can be seen in the OP's linked pictures. This was the last significant race to allow their use. They had been used in continental one-day classics as early as 1930.

              Prior, a rider named Stephanois Panel used a derailleur in the 1912 Tour. Former winner (1907 & 1908) Lucien Petit-Breton famously used a Sturmey-Archer hub in the Tour in 1913.

              Use of multiple change-gearing was subsequently banned by race director Henri Desgrange. Degrange wanted a competition between athletes - a fine goal - and kind of had a sore spot about gear bikes anyway - you might recall his fixed gear riding champion had been humiliated by Velocio's young woman riding a change-gear bike at the 1902 Touring Club of France's trials. But finally, the tide of change became too great even for the Tour, and he relented and allowed specified types of derailleur to be used beginning in 1937 (three years prior to his death).

              The Tour gets great press and some folks think it's the be all and end all of racing. There's actually lots of bicycle racing of many, many types all over the world controlled by various rules and there historically always has been. See the History folder in this Group's Files section for more on this.

              Note: Derailleurs were 'invented' in France when, around 1905, Velocio purchased a British-built Whippet New Protean bicycle, whose fork rear derailleur looked remarkably like those used in the Tour in '37. The New Protean had been on the British cycle market since ~1899, but was preceded by the Gradient derailleur system of 1896.

              pj
            • bikealfa
              Good thing someone knows enough to correct my errors. Michael Wilson
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 25 7:27 AM
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                Good thing someone knows enough to correct my errors.

                Michael Wilson

                --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "pj" <prester_john_in_cathay@...> wrote:
                >
                > Note: Derailleurs were 'invented' in France when, around 1905, Velocio purchased a British-built Whippet New Protean bicycle, whose fork rear derailleur looked remarkably like those used in the Tour in '37. The New Protean had been on the British cycle market since ~1899, but was preceded by the Gradient derailleur system of 1896.
                >
                > pj
                >
              • rons_hobbies
                Thanks everyone, public and private, for taking the time to pass on their knowledge. I find it all facinating. And now I have some factoides to mention in my
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 25 7:46 AM
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                  Thanks everyone, public and private, for taking the time to pass on their knowledge. I find it all facinating. And now I have some factoides to mention in my maintenance class. Simply because as PJ noted, most know of the TdF if nothing else.

                  "The Dancing Chain." has been in my Amazon shopping cart for some time. Guess I need to either get it or move it to my wish-list and see if my GF takes the himt :-)

                  Ron

                  --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "rons_hobbies" <peter.pilot@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > 100ème Tour de France, 100 vélos, 100 champions...
                  >
                  > http://velosvintage.over-blog.com/article-100eme-tour-de-france-100-velos-116479381.html
                  >
                  > Quick review shows the first rear derailleur 1939. Am I missing something?
                  >
                  > Ron
                  >
                • pj
                  ... With the possible exception of the Rohloff applied to mountain bike racing, there are currently no models of IGH whose design and manufacture is intended
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 25 8:42 PM
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                    > I'm curious: When did the last hub-geared bike compete
                    > in the Tour? And, putting aside how competitive a rider
                    > would (or could) be with one, are hub gears legal to use
                    > now?

                    With the possible exception of the Rohloff applied to mountain bike racing, there are currently no models of IGH whose design and manufacture is intended for racing application (weight, ratios, step size...cost), so competitive use of modern production IGHs for racing is sort of a theoretical question. This has not always been the case, and again, I will refer interested parties to the articles in the History folder of the Files section.

                    Now, 'racing" can be a lot of things. Races controlled by the UCI (like the Tour) must abide by their rules.

                    <http://www.uci.ch/Modules/BUILTIN/getObject.asp?MenuId=MTY2NjU&ObjTypeCode=FILE&type=FILE&id=34033&LangId=1>

                    As I read section 1.3.025, I don't see anything that specifically prohibits use of production IGHs, but, and it's a big but, section 1.3.004 says: "no technical innovation regarding anything used, worn or carried by any rider or license holder during a competition may be used until approved by the UCI." Are there any IGHs currently approved for use by the UCI? I don't think so. (BTW - somebody has to pay the UCI to consider approving something.)

                    However, there's a great deal of 'racing' that the UCI doesn't control, from the world's oldest race, the Paris-Brest-Paris, to Great Britain's 130 years of RRA rides, to the London Nocturne Folding Bike Race

                    <http://youtu.be/zmQ5HkRzaZQ>

                    to the ride that begins every Saturday morning outside your LBS (where the first rider back gets bragging rights for a week). By-and-large IGHs would be perfectly 'legal' to use in these competitions.

                    Say - did you know that there are a few competitions that are specifically for IGH bikes? Here's one:

                    <http://homepage.ntlworld.com/stu_collins/tincanten/>

                    pj
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