Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Civia

Expand Messages
  • Rich Wood
    Ben; The front gas tank position may have been copied from an American design ;-) Take a look at where the gas tank was on the Model A Ford. The tank was
    Message 1 of 27 , Apr 3, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Ben;

      The front gas tank position may have been copied from an American design ;-) Take a look at where the gas tank was on the Model A Ford. The tank was basically built into the firewall with the gas cap right in front of the windshield. Never get that past the DOT today. My Dad drove one to work regularly up to about 1950.

      A lot of older automotive designs would today be considered engineering disasters waiting to happen, including the Pinto.

      I agree that the SA 3 speed was a seminal design which is still good. In fact the earlier ones, such as the version licensed by BSA for years, may have been even better than the AW from some things I have read.

      Take a look on the Swobo web site. They have introduced two new models with removable adjustable dropouts. One is a SS/FG using the new SRAM Torpedo fixed/freewheel quick convertible hub and the other is a 700C wheel bike with the Alfine hub. Already copying one Civia Hyland design idea. Disc brake caliper mounting on the moveable dropout so it moves with chain adjustment is another idea they have copied too.

      The new models are the Baxter and the Crosby.

      Rich Wood


      --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "Ben" <benben44@...> wrote:
      >
      > Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. I don't expect to see many air cooled, rear wheel drive motor vehicles, with the gas tank directly in front of the driver, built in the near future (PPD).
      >
      > The S/A 3 speed internal hub seems to be a different story. Not only are decades old examples still in service, the IGH is poised to be a preferred design in the future.
      >
      > I expect to see other bicycle manufacturers begin to incorporate some of the design features found on the Civia Highland. Specifically, the removable, interchangeable rear dropouts and the down tube groove that adds strength and channels cables and wiring (not PPD).
      >
    • Ben
      Wow! Swobo is certainly a brand to watch. It appears that they are working on improving the finish. The forks on both of these bikes look much nicer than the
      Message 2 of 27 , Apr 3, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Wow! Swobo is certainly a brand to watch. It appears that they are working on improving the finish. The forks on both of these bikes look much nicer than the Dixon. I'm impressed that the Baxter manages to knock 5 pounds off the Dixon for a very similar package. It is good to see an upstart company move to improve their product while maintaining good value.
      • Darol Hinton
        The reason that many front engined cars had gas tanks up front and high was gravity fed fuel systems.  Another thing that would not pass muster today.....not
        Message 3 of 27 , Apr 6, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          The reason that many front engined cars had gas tanks up front and high was gravity fed fuel systems.  Another thing that would not pass muster today.....not being able to shut off the fuel flow in the event of a leak.
           
          Now we are way OT.....or I am.

          --- On Fri, 4/3/09, Rich Wood <astronut1001@...> wrote:

          From: Rich Wood <astronut1001@...>
          Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Civia
          To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Friday, April 3, 2009, 9:22 PM

          Ben;

          The front gas tank position may have been copied from an American design ;-) Take a look at where the gas tank was on the Model A Ford. The tank was basically built into the firewall with the gas cap right in front of the windshield. Never get that past the DOT today. My Dad drove one to work regularly up to about 1950.

          A lot of older automotive designs would today be considered engineering disasters waiting to happen, including the Pinto.

          I agree that the SA 3 speed was a seminal design which is still good. In fact the earlier ones, such as the version licensed by BSA for years, may have been even better than the AW from some things I have read.

          Take a look on the Swobo web site. They have introduced two new models with removable adjustable dropouts. One is a SS/FG using the new SRAM Torpedo fixed/freewheel quick convertible hub and the other is a 700C wheel bike with the Alfine hub. Already copying one Civia Hyland design idea. Disc brake caliper mounting on the moveable dropout so it moves with chain adjustment is another idea they have copied too.

          The new models are the Baxter and the Crosby.

          Rich Wood

          --- In Geared_hub_bikes@ yahoogroups. com, "Ben" <benben44@.. .> wrote:
          >
          > Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. I don't expect to see many air cooled, rear wheel drive motor vehicles, with the gas tank directly in front of the driver, built in the near future (PPD).
          >
          > The S/A 3 speed internal hub seems to be a different story. Not only are decades old examples still in service, the IGH is poised to be a preferred design in the future.
          >
          > I expect to see other bicycle manufacturers begin to incorporate some of the design features found on the Civia Highland. Specifically, the removable, interchangeable rear dropouts and the down tube groove that adds strength and channels cables and wiring (not PPD).
          >


        • Ben
          I was going to just drop the off topic discussion I had initiated. However, since more than 24 hours has gone by without a post to this group, maybe I can
          Message 4 of 27 , Apr 7, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            I was going to just drop the "off topic" discussion I had initiated. However, since more than 24 hours has gone by without a post to this group, maybe I can stir things up.

            There was a part of the VW engine story I left out. While I'm sitting there with the VW engine in pieces, my friend grabbed a connecting rod (not #3 of course because that was trashed....PPD). We went over to his shop where he had a Volvo B-18 engine torn down. He picked up one of the Volvo rods and held it up besides the VW rod. "Notice that the bottom end of the Volvo is twice as big as the VW. You might also be interested to know that the Volvo rod is forged, (not cast), out of the best steel in the world. You almost never have to replace a rod when you overhaul a Volvo!". (It was SOP to replace the rods when doing the VW).

            I wasn't around in 1936 or whenever it was that VW engineers (Dr. Porche?) thought it might be a good idea to put a full tank of gasoline right in front of the driver with little structural support. By the 1970's when all of this happened, Pinto's were going off all over the place and VW had manufactured a record number of what was obviously by then, a piss poor and dangerous, design.

            The point of all this is that the more I came to appreciate quality, the less I found myself working on my cars. With my new found free time I wandered into a bike shop one day and discovered the show case where they kept the jewels (Campy groupo). Now I'm a complete sucker for eye candy.
          • Rich Wood
            Ben; Remember that when Dr. Porsche designed the VW engine it was designed for about 1.1 liter displacement and 25 or so horsepower. At that level of output
            Message 5 of 27 , Apr 8, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Ben;

              Remember that when Dr. Porsche designed the VW engine it was designed for about 1.1 liter displacement and 25 or so horsepower. At that level of output the rods might have lasted forever. As I recall the valves could also be a problem. Market demand kept them upping displacement and HP in order to make performance more acceptable.

              The British motorcycle industry did much the same thing. The majority of their engines were pre WW2 500cc designs with bearings designed for 25 HP or so. By the end they were 750cc and a claimed 50+ HP or so with basically the same designs and bearings. Norton took theirs to a final 850cc as I recall. Reliability went to hell if the performance was actually used.

              If you think the VW was bad, do you remember the Renault Dauphine? It made the VW look good! They sold a bundle of them till the word got out. 20K or less between engine rebuilds as I recall.

              I also remember the family 48 Plymouth, a flat head 6. In 1952 we drove it to NY. By the time we reached there it had a rod knock, requiring a rebuild. Most pre war engine designs were grossly under bearinged by modern engineering standards.

              My uncle had one of the first VW vans made, apparently brought back from Germany by a GI. The year it was manufactured the engine was 1100cc and 28 horsepower as I recall, totally inadequate for freeway use.

              Automotive engineering standards have changed drastically compared to what they once were as have performance and safety standards.

              Now lets get back to bikes and accessories ;-)

              Rich Wood


              --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "Ben" <benben44@...> wrote:
              >
              > I was going to just drop the "off topic" discussion I had initiated. However, since more than 24 hours has gone by without a post to this group, maybe I can stir things up.
              >
              > There was a part of the VW engine story I left out. While I'm sitting there with the VW engine in pieces, my friend grabbed a connecting rod (not #3 of course because that was trashed....PPD). We went over to his shop where he had a Volvo B-18 engine torn down. He picked up one of the Volvo rods and held it up besides the VW rod. "Notice that the bottom end of the Volvo is twice as big as the VW. You might also be interested to know that the Volvo rod is forged, (not cast), out of the best steel in the world. You almost never have to replace a rod when you overhaul a Volvo!". (It was SOP to replace the rods when doing the VW).
              >
              > I wasn't around in 1936 or whenever it was that VW engineers (Dr. Porche?) thought it might be a good idea to put a full tank of gasoline right in front of the driver with little structural support. By the 1970's when all of this happened, Pinto's were going off all over the place and VW had manufactured a record number of what was obviously by then, a piss poor and dangerous, design.
              >
              > The point of all this is that the more I came to appreciate quality, the less I found myself working on my cars. With my new found free time I wandered into a bike shop one day and discovered the show case where they kept the jewels (Campy groupo). Now I'm a complete sucker for eye candy.
              >
            • Aaron Goss
              Actually dealers have to become Civia dealers. Only authorized dealers can order. Another reason to support your LBS. The minimum is not high so get your
              Message 6 of 27 , May 4, 2011
              • 0 Attachment

                Actually dealers have to become Civia dealers. Only authorized dealers can order. Another reason to support your LBS. The minimum is not high so get your friends together and encourage your LBS to stock more IGH bikes!

              • Rich W
                Aaron; I know that two years ago College Cyclery in Reno was able to order me a Civia Hyland Rohloff without becoming a full dealer. Maybe because there was
                Message 7 of 27 , May 4, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Aaron;

                  I know that two years ago College Cyclery in Reno was able to order me a Civia Hyland Rohloff without becoming a full dealer. Maybe because there was no authorized dealer in the area. The shop does use QBP as their primary parts supplier for most items. They also got me a Surly Big Dummy last year w/o becoming a full Surly dealer and per the Surly web site there is a Surly dealer in Reno, Bicycle Bananas.

                  Rich Wood

                  --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Goss <aaron@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Actually dealers have to become Civia dealers. Only authorized dealers can
                  > order. Another reason to support your LBS. The minimum is not high so get
                  > your friends together and encourage your LBS to stock more IGH bikes!
                  >
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.