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IGH Tourer

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  • patoigo
    The SO has been pining for a second bicycle and I ve got the funds to get her one. Her current bike a derailleur equipped, carbon-fiber road bike. I d like to
    Message 1 of 13 , Apr 25, 2013
      The SO has been pining for a second bicycle and I've got the funds to get her one. Her current bike a derailleur equipped, carbon-fiber road bike. I'd like to get her an IGH suitable for touring. Co-Motion seems to have quite a few candidates, but they all have belt drives. While the belt drive for my Alfine 8 equipped Civia Bryant is perfect for year-round commuting, I'd prefer something I could service when doing self-supported touring. Any suggestions?
    • patoigo
      I should mention that the bike must have S&S couplers for travel.
      Message 2 of 13 , Apr 25, 2013
        I should mention that the bike must have S&S couplers for travel.

        --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "patoigo" <ptoigo@...> wrote:
        >
        > The SO has been pining for a second bicycle <snip>
      • pj
        I bet CoMotion would build you one with a chain if you wanted. Going semi-custom (start with a frame and build up from there) opens up many more options in IGH
        Message 3 of 13 , Apr 26, 2013
          I bet CoMotion would build you one with a chain if you wanted.

          Going semi-custom (start with a frame and build up from there) opens up many more options in IGH tourers.

          Off the rack and off the top of my head, Tout Terrain and Thorn come to mind.

          > I should mention that the bike must have S&S couplers for travel.

          Easy enough to add to any bike that suits otherwise.

          pj
        • Rick Paulos
          I have a Ritchey BreakAway road bike. IMO, Ritchey s method of taking the bike apart for shipping is vasty superior to S&S couplings. The Ritchey coupling
          Message 4 of 13 , Apr 26, 2013
            I have a Ritchey BreakAway road bike. IMO,
            Ritchey's method of taking the bike apart for
            shipping is vasty superior to S&S couplings.

            The Ritchey coupling system is much lighter,
            pretty much invisible, only requires a couple
            allen wrenches and the appropriate pedal wrench
            to fully dismantle for packing and
            reassembly. I've seen the road model used in
            crit racing. My road racing model is quite light
            and way stiff. Not really suitable for
            touring. Ritchey has since come out with a cx /
            touring model with all the needed mounts for canti/vbrakes, racks, etc.

            You can get the Breakaway made of steel, ti or a
            ti/carbon mix in road racing design or a cx/touring model.
            All designed for convention drive trains, ie,
            vertical droputs and der hangers. You can fit
            IGH hubs but you would probably need a chain tensioner.

            With both S&S and the Breakaway, you would need
            to remove the rear wheel for stowing. Remember to pack the appropriate tools.

            The Breakaway price may be comparable to a Co-motion.

            I suppose someone could custom build you a
            breakaway style frame with horizontal dropouts or
            an eccentric bb for igh chain adjusting.

            http://www.ritcheylogic.com/dyn_category.php?k=472401

            rick


            At 08:49 AM 4/26/2013, you wrote:
            >
            >
            >I bet CoMotion would build you one with a chain if you wanted.
            >
            >Going semi-custom (start with a frame and build
            >up from there) opens up many more options in IGH tourers.
            >
            >Off the rack and off the top of my head, Tout Terrain and Thorn come to mind.
            >
            > > I should mention that the bike must have S&S couplers for travel.
            >
            >Easy enough to add to any bike that suits otherwise.
            >
            >pj
            >
            >
          • Colin Bryant
            My belt drive experience is with motorcycles, but the experience was good.  It far outlasted chain drives (about 6 times longer), required less maintenance
            Message 5 of 13 , Apr 26, 2013
              My belt drive experience is with motorcycles, but the experience was good.  It far outlasted chain drives (about 6 times longer), required less maintenance and was clean.  When it did finally start spitting teeth, there was lots of time to plan for replacement.

              I'm not sure how self-supported, or how far from civilization you're planning to go, but if you did have problems with a belt drive system, IGH cogs, chains and conventional chainrings should be easy to come by, while touring.

               
              --

              Colin

               


              From: patoigo <ptoigo@...>
              To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2013 8:54:43 PM
              Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer

               
              The SO has been pining for a second bicycle and I've got the funds to get her one. Her current bike a derailleur equipped, carbon-fiber road bike. I'd like to get her an IGH suitable for touring. Co-Motion seems to have quite a few candidates, but they all have belt drives. While the belt drive for my Alfine 8 equipped Civia Bryant is perfect for year-round commuting, I'd prefer something I could service when doing self-supported touring. Any suggestions?



            • jim
              I ve never owned a belted bike, but am wondering if carrying a spare along would be too much weight and bulk? Or will the cogs die as the belt does?
              Message 6 of 13 , Apr 26, 2013
                I've never owned a belted bike, but am wondering if carrying a spare along would be too much weight and bulk? Or will the cogs die as the belt does?

                From: Colin Bryant <sk8ski2004@...>
                To: "Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com" <Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, April 26, 2013 4:10 PM
                Subject: Re: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer
                 
                My belt drive experience is with motorcycles, but the experience was good.  It far outlasted chain drives (about 6 times longer), required less maintenance and was clean.  When it did finally start spitting teeth, there was lots of time to plan for replacement. I'm not sure how self-supported, or how far from civilization you're planning to go, but if you did have problems with a belt drive system, IGH cogs, chains and conventional chainrings should be easy to come by, while touring.
                 
                -- Colin

                 

                From: patoigo <ptoigo@...>
                To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2013 8:54:43 PM
                Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer
                 
                The SO has been pining for a second bicycle and I've got the funds to get her one. Her current bike a derailleur equipped, carbon-fiber road bike. I'd like to get her an IGH suitable for touring. Co-Motion seems to have quite a few candidates, but they all have belt drives. While the belt drive for my Alfine 8 equipped Civia Bryant is perfect for year-round commuting, I'd prefer something I could service when doing self-supported touring. Any suggestions?
              • Zack B
                What happens to a c-belt when a bit of glass or radial wire gets between the belt and the cog ?
                Message 7 of 13 , Apr 26, 2013

                  What happens to a c-belt when a bit of glass or radial wire gets between the belt and the cog ?

                  On Apr 26, 2013 1:21 PM, "jim" <jimbofla1138@...> wrote:
                   

                  I've never owned a belted bike, but am wondering if carrying a spare along would be too much weight and bulk? Or will the cogs die as the belt does?

                  From: Colin Bryant <sk8ski2004@...>
                  To: "Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com" <Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Friday, April 26, 2013 4:10 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer
                   
                  My belt drive experience is with motorcycles, but the experience was good.  It far outlasted chain drives (about 6 times longer), required less maintenance and was clean.  When it did finally start spitting teeth, there was lots of time to plan for replacement.I'm not sure how self-supported, or how far from civilization you're planning to go, but if you did have problems with a belt drive system, IGH cogs, chains and conventional chainrings should be easy to come by, while touring.
                   
                  --Colin

                   

                  From: patoigo <ptoigo@...>
                  To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2013 8:54:43 PM
                  Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer
                   
                  The SO has been pining for a second bicycle and I've got the funds to get her one. Her current bike a derailleur equipped, carbon-fiber road bike. I'd like to get her an IGH suitable for touring. Co-Motion seems to have quite a few candidates, but they all have belt drives. While the belt drive for my Alfine 8 equipped Civia Bryant is perfect for year-round commuting, I'd prefer something I could service when doing self-supported touring. Any suggestions?
                • Colin Bryant
                  My motorcycle experience was that the cogs needed replacing at about the same time as the belt.  A spare would let you finish your tour, even if it was
                  Message 8 of 13 , Apr 26, 2013
                    My motorcycle experience was that the cogs needed replacing at about the same time as the belt.  A spare would let you finish your tour, even if it was running in the less than ideal situation of work cogs.  The belt, itself was quite light, but you can't bend them sharply, without damaging them.

                     
                    --

                    Colin Bryant

                     


                    From: jim <jimbofla1138@...>
                    To: "Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com" <Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Friday, April 26, 2013 1:21:36 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer

                     
                    I've never owned a belted bike, but am wondering if carrying a spare along would be too much weight and bulk? Or will the cogs die as the belt does?

                    From: Colin Bryant <sk8ski2004@...>
                    To: "Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com" <Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Friday, April 26, 2013 4:10 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer
                     
                    My belt drive experience is with motorcycles, but the experience was good.  It far outlasted chain drives (about 6 times longer), required less maintenance and was clean.  When it did finally start spitting teeth, there was lots of time to plan for replacement. I'm not sure how self-supported, or how far from civilization you're planning to go, but if you did have problems with a belt drive system, IGH cogs, chains and conventional chainrings should be easy to come by, while touring.
                     
                    -- Colin

                     

                    From: patoigo <ptoigo@...>
                    To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2013 8:54:43 PM
                    Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer
                     
                    The SO has been pining for a second bicycle and I've got the funds to get her one. Her current bike a derailleur equipped, carbon-fiber road bike. I'd like to get her an IGH suitable for touring. Co-Motion seems to have quite a few candidates, but they all have belt drives. While the belt drive for my Alfine 8 equipped Civia Bryant is perfect for year-round commuting, I'd prefer something I could service when doing self-supported touring. Any suggestions?


                  • Bobbie Martin
                    Probably not the typical tourer, but have you looked at a Moulton TSR? They are available in a separable model should you need to transport it. They are great
                    Message 9 of 13 , Apr 26, 2013
                      Probably not the typical tourer, but have you looked at a Moulton TSR?
                      They are available in a separable model should you need to transport it. 
                      They are great touring bikes and are available with several IGHs,
                      Sturmey-Archer XRF-8, SRAM Dual Drive and some shops sell models with Alfine 11 or even Rohloff hubs.
                      Bobbie Martin
                      From: patoigo <ptoigo@...>
                      To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2013 8:54:43 PM
                      Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer
                       
                      The SO has been pining for a second bicycle and I've got the funds to get her one. Her current bike a derailleur equipped, carbon-fiber road bike. I'd like to get her an IGH suitable for touring. Co-Motion seems to have quite a few candidates, but they all have belt drives. While the belt drive for my Alfine 8 equipped Civia Bryant is perfect for year-round commuting, I'd prefer something I could service when doing self-supported touring. Any suggestions?


                    • Rick Paulos
                      I ve speculated on sticks and mud during off road use and trouser legs and sand. The newer cogs are open at the bottom to prevent a large accumulation of dirt
                      Message 10 of 13 , Apr 26, 2013
                        I've speculated on sticks and mud during off road use and trouser legs and sand.  The newer cogs are open at the bottom to prevent a large accumulation of dirt or grit which would increase the effective cog size and tighten the belt to the point of slippage, breakage or just grinding the cogs down.  Pants legs or shoe laces and you get the same rewards as a direct chain.  Your pedaling typically get stopped dead and you are stuck to your bike in an awkward position, often laying on the pavement, especially if you can't back pedal due to a coaster brake.  Fun stuff for You Tube videos.  Perhaps you can just  rip your trouser leg off.

                        The belts are quite light but you also need to carry the tools to change it.  Wrench for the rear axle and what ever your particular bike takes to separate the frame as needed.
                        The belts are far lighter than the spare folding tire I carry on long tours.

                        As to finding a spare on tour?  Well I have the same argument about 650b vs 700c vs 26" tires.  You can buy a 26" tire in every bike shop, wal mart and many hard ware stores.  Tens of thosands of retailer will have 26" tires, something to get you going again.  700c and you are mostly limited to bike shops.  650b and only some bike shops.  Hard to imagine more than a few bike shops carry belts in your needed size.  Belts & odd tires mean you are stuck waiting for fedex to deliver which can be a couple of days or more including ordering and processing time.

                        Belts are amazingly durable and reliable in cars but they are fully enclosed as timing belts so no sticks or stones or mud will affect them.

                        Rick

                        At 03:36 PM 4/26/2013, you wrote:
                         

                        What happens to a c-belt when a bit of glass or radial wire gets between the belt and the cog ?
                        On Apr 26, 2013 1:21 PM, "jim" <jimbofla1138@... > wrote:
                         

                        I've never owned a belted bike, but am wondering if carrying a spare along would be too much weight and bulk? Or will the cogs die as the belt does?

                        From: Colin Bryant <sk8ski2004@...>
                        To: " Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com" < Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Friday, April 26, 2013 4:10 PM
                        Subject: Re: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer
                         
                        My belt drive experience is with motorcycles, but the experience was good.  It far outlasted chain drives (about 6 times longer), required less maintenance and was clean.  When it did finally start spitting teeth, there was lots of time to plan for replacement.I'm not sure how self-supported, or how far from civilization you're planning to go, but if you did have problems with a belt drive system, IGH cogs, chains and conventional chainrings should be easy to come by, while touring.
                         
                        --Colin

                         

                        From: patoigo <ptoigo@...>
                        To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2013 8:54:43 PM
                        Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer
                         
                        The SO has been pining for a second bicycle and I've got the funds to get her one. Her current bike a derailleur equipped, carbon-fiber road bike. I'd like to get her an IGH suitable for touring. Co-Motion seems to have quite a few candidates, but they all have belt drives. While the belt drive for my Alfine 8 equipped Civia Bryant is perfect for year-round commuting, I'd prefer something I could service when doing self-supported touring. Any suggestions?


                      • JUDSON D JONES
                        Forget the weight and space. The reason for a spare Is karmic prophylaxis: the notion that because you have the spare, you will never need it. Sent from my
                        Message 11 of 13 , Apr 26, 2013
                          Forget the weight and space. The reason for a spare Is karmic prophylaxis: the notion that because you have the spare, you will never need it.

                          Sent from my iPhone

                          On Apr 26, 2013, at 3:21 PM, "jim" <jimbofla1138@...> wrote:

                           

                          I've never owned a belted bike, but am wondering if carrying a spare along would be too much weight and bulk? Or will the cogs die as the belt does?

                          From: Colin Bryant <sk8ski2004@...>
                          To: "Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com" <Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Friday, April 26, 2013 4:10 PM
                          Subject: Re: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer
                           
                          My belt drive experience is with motorcycles, but the experience was good.  It far outlasted chain drives (about 6 times longer), required less maintenance and was clean.  When it did finally start spitting teeth, there was lots of time to plan for replacement. I'm not sure how self-supported, or how far from civilization you're planning to go, but if you did have problems with a belt drive system, IGH cogs, chains and conventional chainrings should be easy to come by, while touring.
                           
                          -- Colin

                           

                          From: patoigo <ptoigo@...>
                          To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2013 8:54:43 PM
                          Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] IGH Tourer
                           
                          The SO has been pining for a second bicycle and I've got the funds to get her one. Her current bike a derailleur equipped, carbon-fiber road bike. I'd like to get her an IGH suitable for touring. Co-Motion seems to have quite a few candidates, but they all have belt drives. While the belt drive for my Alfine 8 equipped Civia Bryant is perfect for year-round commuting, I'd prefer something I could service when doing self-supported touring. Any suggestions?

                        • Jim Kukula
                          I have a Thorn Nomad Mk2 - an expedition tourer with a Rohloff, chain drive, S&S couplers. I like it a lot but I can t call myself a real connoisseur of fine
                          Message 12 of 13 , Apr 26, 2013
                            I have a Thorn Nomad Mk2 - an expedition tourer with a Rohloff, chain drive, S&S couplers. I like it a lot but I can't call myself a real connoisseur of fine touring bikes. Anyway I think it belongs on your list of candidates!
                          • Thorsten Ostrander
                            Depends on what features are most important I reckon. I ve never seen a Tout Terrain but I like the bike on paper. Sorry Alex. At NAHBS, I saw the Comotion
                            Message 13 of 13 , Apr 26, 2013
                              Depends on what features are most important I reckon.  I've never seen a Tout Terrain but I like the bike on paper.  Sorry Alex.  At NAHBS, I saw the Comotion Americano and it is definitely a well made machine.   Not sure if they have changed their dropout to interface with the Rohloff OEM2 axle plate.  You can always run a chain on any belt designed bike.  The Comotion Rohloff shifter has a nice feel but it appears to be kinda big and perhaps heavier than OEM if it matters.  Good luck deciding.
                              Thorsten


                              On Fri, Apr 26, 2013 at 6:26 PM, Jim Kukula <jim.kukula@...> wrote:
                               

                              I have a Thorn Nomad Mk2 - an expedition tourer with a Rohloff, chain drive, S&S couplers. I like it a lot but I can't call myself a real connoisseur of fine touring bikes. Anyway I think it belongs on your list of candidates!


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