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Re: rohloff without rohloff dropouts

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  • bikealfa
    Your picture is of a vertical dropout frame. I use forward-opening horizontal dropouts, so the hub moves forward about an inch on removal, which is when there
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 20, 2013
      Your picture is of a vertical dropout frame. I use forward-opening horizontal dropouts, so the hub moves forward about an inch on removal, which is when there is a problem. The frame is an 80s chrome-plated schwinn that was advertised as a paramount but was made in Taiwan (if I remember correctly) and uses a 21.1 mm stem. I never bothered to identify it further; it was not enough money.

      Michael Wilson

      --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Alex Wetmore <alex@...> wrote:
      >
      > I've installed Rohloffs on about a dozen bikes now and haven't run into that particular problem with dropout interference. What frame are you using? The frame that I built has very stays that come pretty far down the dropouts and it still hasn't been an issue:
      > http://alexandchristine.smugmug.com/Bicycles/Framebuilding/Wetmorian11/8404803_fVqhjh#!i=721998818&k=8tktx73
      >
      > The disk brake hub does have a larger left side end cap due to the disk mounts. I've installed the disk hubs on about half a dozen frames, but most have been disk ready and already had good chainstay clearance to clear 180mm or larger disk rotors.
      >
      > I'm also somewhat lazy about oil changes on my Rohloff, but still try to do it at least every other year. If the bike is kept somewhere that is subject to regular temperature swings (like a non-heated garage) then it will be wicking in moisture into the oil if you ride or not. This is why most oil bath systems (engines, oil lubricated transmissions, etc) specify oil change intervals based on miles and time, not just miles.
      >
      > alex
      > ________________________________________
      > From: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com [Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of bikealfa [mtwils@...]
      > Sent: Friday, April 19, 2013 7:56 AM
      > To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: rohloff without rohloff dropouts
      >
      > Bending the tourque arm was so obvious that I had forgotten ...
      >
      > No, the part that corresponds to a driver on an SA AW extends almost to the dropout, and there is a similar thing on the left side of the disc hub. I actually filed the left side for more clearance. With the dropouts at 135 mm, the back of the chain stays where they are brazed to the dropout is about 125 mm, and the hub needs to fit between the chain stays but it does not.
      >
      > When I bought the Rohloff 12 years ago I got the QR disc brake version, because I had no idea what I was going to do with it. Even then my vision was a full disc brake belt drive road bike, something that has never happened for various reasons (and yes I know someone not too far from me was offering such a bike commercially a few years ago).
      >
      > It may be 5 years since I have changed the oil on the Rohloff, but it probably only gets 100 miles per year. Is that a problem?
      >
      >
      > Michael Wilson
      >
      > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Alex Wetmore <alex@> wrote:
      > >
      > > They still make that part.
      > >
      > > Most Rohloff users today are probably using the OEM2 anti-torque plate, which interfaces with the disk tabs on disk brake equipped bikes (you don't need Rohloff-specific dropouts). That doesn't have any of these problems. Even on my non-disc bikes I put a 6mm boss at the correct location to interface with the OEM2 torque plate.
      > >
      > > I will say that I have used that anti-torque arm on a number of bikes and never had issues with it. The roads aren't salted around here, but I'd expect to have to lube any moving interfaces (even simple ones like a quick release) in a salt-laden environment. It is a fairly simple thing to lube it once a year when you do the hub's oil change. The stock hose clamps are very high quality ones and hold very well when torqued to spec. I agree that they don't look great, but given the challenges of mounting to a chainstay I'm not sure that they could have done anything that is any better.
      > >
      > > I did always bend the torque arm slightly to get good alignment between the chainstay and the torque arm. I think that this is even discussed in the manual. Is that the 130mm wide part of the hub that you were having trouble with?
      > >
      > > alex
      > > ________________________________________
      > > From: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com [Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of bikealfa [mtwils@]
      > > Sent: Thursday, April 18, 2013 7:11 AM
      > > To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] rohloff without rohloff dropouts
      > >
      > > Rohloff at least used to make the hub available with a long tourque arm that allowed you to use the hub on a bike without the Rohloff dropout. I have mine on an old chrome schwinn with forward-facing "horizontal" dropouts. I cannot recommend this because the hub is 130+mm wide at places some distance from the axle, so there is interference with the chain stays where they attach to the dropout when the wheel is removed or installed. The tourque arm attachment is a bit hokey too - it uses a worm drive hose clamp, and my QR piece for that is seizing up. Too much salt; I used that bike as the studded tire bike for 2 seasons.
      > >
      > > Michael Wilson
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
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