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Re: Another belt drive supplier

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  • aarons_bicycle_repair
    If you factor in Center-track belts, this is the 4th time I have seen belt drives come to market in the last 25 years. They are nothing new and were even
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 28, 2013
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      If you factor in Center-track belts, this is the 4th time I have seen belt drives come to market in the last 25 years. They are nothing new and were even tried early in the 20th century, but of course did not work. Same for shaft drive. The major change this time with belts is that they do not have a connection (master link so to speak) like all previous versions.

      I think belts really are just a gimmick. They are neat but really just for super high end bikes. A niche item. I don't see them ever getting to the masses. The frame and components have to be of a certain quality for belts to even work. If we do see them on less expensive bikes problems are bound to happen.

      One huge drawback for me is that they are landfill bound. How do you recycle one? That is a huge concern also for me about carbon parts in general. We really do need to stop wasting the earth. Bikes for me help with that. Many people will poo-poo that notion, but for me it is a consideration in everything I buy or sell.

      Another drawback to belts is that I have yet to see a customer's bike come in with proper tension. Excepting all you on this forum, belt bikes are really not user serviceable.

      We saw one belt come in that was really dirty. All the blue had worn off the inside of the belt and the teeth on the chainring were visibly worn. It was hard to clean the belt. and the chainrings. Harder than a chain since we just used soap and water. Not sure if you can use a solvent on a belt, but probably would not need to.

      Like chains, belts do not stretch. They wear and this is what causes them to loose tension (besides improper installation)

      So far the easiest bike I have worked on with a belt was a Ventana El Comandante. It has pivoting dropouts with big adjusting screws. The hardest bike I worked on was one with an eccentric BB. Adjusting screws allow easier and more accurate belt tensioning in my experience. The Snubber seems like a good idea considering the difficulty in tensioning a belt.

      Basically belts make servicing the bike more difficult and technical so I suppose I should embrace them. However, I don't think they will ever become a common item. I would not be surprised if they go away again, only to be resurrected in 10 or 15 years. If history is any lesson, that is what will happen.

      --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Cycle Monkey <cyclemonkey@...> wrote:
      >
      > No lubrication, no "stretch", and a significant increase in lifespan.
      >
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