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Keeping the adjustment of the alfine 11 in horizontal dropouts.

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  • freetobike2012
    I ve seen the tension adjusters for the single speed style reverse horizontal dropouts and that got me wondering about something similar for the traditional
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 17, 2013
      I've seen the tension adjusters for the single speed style reverse horizontal dropouts and that got me wondering about something similar for the traditional style horizontal dropouts.
      Seems that locking in that adjustment is really critical to ensuring the hub shifts correctly.
      Began wondering if a chain tensioner (surly offers one) might be worth a look sence this ride I'm building will be facing climbs as well as flat rides and-while I'm not intent on getting out of the saddle on said climbs-I'm worried the tension could pull the axel just enough.
      The dropouts on the Ross Centaur (bike I'm doing the build on)have the threaded boss for adjusters. While they might be too small and too fine thread not to strip, I wondered if something along the idea of the reverse dropout adjuster/tensioner could be adapted.
      Rich mc
    • bnexus8
      Imo the best option is a frame with an eccentric bb. I have two: a Dahon Cadenza and a Carver 96 er. Of those the Dahon is easier to adjust. I also have an On
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 18, 2013
        Imo the best option is a frame with an eccentric bb. I have two: a Dahon Cadenza and a Carver 96'er. Of those the Dahon is easier to adjust.
        I also have an On One Inbred frame and for that I used the modification to an On One chain tug shown here: http://forums.mtbr.com/internal-gear-hubs/alfine-tugnut-521068.html

        It should be noted, iirc, that On One don't bother with a change tug and just do the axle nuts on the 11 or 8 up tight.

        I wouldn't describe the adjustment as really critical. Obviously it has to be adjusted correctly but there is some leeway there and it can be adjusted at the handlebar as you go along. A rear wheel moving in its slots will, of course, eventually bugger up any amount of adjustment available.

        --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "freetobike2012" <freetobike2012@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've seen the tension adjusters for the single speed style reverse horizontal dropouts and that got me wondering about something similar for the traditional style horizontal dropouts.
        > Seems that locking in that adjustment is really critical to ensuring the hub shifts correctly.
        > Began wondering if a chain tensioner (surly offers one) might be worth a look sence this ride I'm building will be facing climbs as well as flat rides and-while I'm not intent on getting out of the saddle on said climbs-I'm worried the tension could pull the axel just enough.
        > The dropouts on the Ross Centaur (bike I'm doing the build on)have the threaded boss for adjusters. While they might be too small and too fine thread not to strip, I wondered if something along the idea of the reverse dropout adjuster/tensioner could be adapted.
        > Rich mc
        >
      • Colin Bryant
        Cable tension is sensitive on the Alfine 11.  The outer cable housing should be anchored at the end of the cassette joint, not to the frame.   -- Colin
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 18, 2013
          Cable tension is sensitive on the Alfine 11.  The outer cable housing should be anchored at the end of the cassette joint, not to the frame.
           
          --

          Colin Bryant
          Vancouver, Canada

           


          From: bnexus8 <dclark@...>
          To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 5:51:58 AM
          Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Keeping the adjustment of the alfine 11 in horizontal dropouts.

           
          Imo the best option is a frame with an eccentric bb. I have two: a Dahon Cadenza and a Carver 96'er. Of those the Dahon is easier to adjust.
          I also have an On One Inbred frame and for that I used the modification to an On One chain tug shown here: http://forums.mtbr.com/internal-gear-hubs/alfine-tugnut-521068.html

          It should be noted, iirc, that On One don't bother with a change tug and just do the axle nuts on the 11 or 8 up tight.

          I wouldn't describe the adjustment as really critical. Obviously it has to be adjusted correctly but there is some leeway there and it can be adjusted at the handlebar as you go along. A rear wheel moving in its slots will, of course, eventually bugger up any amount of adjustment available.

          --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "freetobike2012" wrote:
          >
          > I've seen the tension adjusters for the single speed style reverse horizontal dropouts and that got me wondering about something similar for the traditional style horizontal dropouts.
          > Seems that locking in that adjustment is really critical to ensuring the hub shifts correctly.
          > Began wondering if a chain tensioner (surly offers one) might be worth a look sence this ride I'm building will be facing climbs as well as flat rides and-while I'm not intent on getting out of the saddle on said climbs-I'm worried the tension could pull the axel just enough.
          > The dropouts on the Ross Centaur (bike I'm doing the build on)have the threaded boss for adjusters. While they might be too small and too fine thread not to strip, I wondered if something along the idea of the reverse dropout adjuster/tensioner could be adapted.
          > Rich mc
          >



        • bikealfa
          If you feel compelled to anchor your shift cable to the frame, lke old Sturmey Archer, rather than some part of the hub, then I highly recommend using the seat
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 19, 2013
            If you feel compelled to anchor your shift cable to the frame, lke old Sturmey Archer, rather than some part of the hub, then I highly recommend using the seat stay rather than the chain stay. On forward-facing "horizontal" dropouts, the seat stay is close to perpendicular to the dropout slot, so cable tension is not changed much with axle movement or chainstay flex.

            Michael Wilson
          • freetobike2012
            Ok, let me back up here. I m very thankful for several insights (had no idea I couldn t use the braze on cable stop to secure the shift cable/housing. The
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 19, 2013
              Ok, let me back up here.
              I'm very thankful for several insights (had no idea I couldn't use the braze on cable stop to secure the shift cable/housing.
              The alfine wheel assembly is already built and IS going on a mid 80s ishawata 024 framed road bike.
              Of six LBS in my area NONE have any hands on experience with the Alfine Hubs (8 or 11) so this IS going to be up to me.
              The bike has the forward facing traditional horizontal hubs.
              My concern was (especially after a tube change)not getting the wheel tight enough to endure without some movement because the bike will be being used on climbs.
              I have the Utube vid on how to install and remove the cable on the hub.This vid also shows the 'connect the yellow dots' part for setting up the correct shifting.
              Any other videos out there I should bookmark?
              Thanks again.

              --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "bnexus8" <dclark@...> wrote:
              >
              > Imo the best option is a frame with an eccentric bb. I have two: a Dahon Cadenza and a Carver 96'er. Of those the Dahon is easier to adjust.
              > I also have an On One Inbred frame and for that I used the modification to an On One chain tug shown here: http://forums.mtbr.com/internal-gear-hubs/alfine-tugnut-521068.html
              >
              > It should be noted, iirc, that On One don't bother with a change tug and just do the axle nuts on the 11 or 8 up tight.
              >
              > I wouldn't describe the adjustment as really critical. Obviously it has to be adjusted correctly but there is some leeway there and it can be adjusted at the handlebar as you go along. A rear wheel moving in its slots will, of course, eventually bugger up any amount of adjustment available.
              >
              > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "freetobike2012" <freetobike2012@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I've seen the tension adjusters for the single speed style reverse horizontal dropouts and that got me wondering about something similar for the traditional style horizontal dropouts.
              > > Seems that locking in that adjustment is really critical to ensuring the hub shifts correctly.
              > > Began wondering if a chain tensioner (surly offers one) might be worth a look sence this ride I'm building will be facing climbs as well as flat rides and-while I'm not intent on getting out of the saddle on said climbs-I'm worried the tension could pull the axel just enough.
              > > The dropouts on the Ross Centaur (bike I'm doing the build on)have the threaded boss for adjusters. While they might be too small and too fine thread not to strip, I wondered if something along the idea of the reverse dropout adjuster/tensioner could be adapted.
              > > Rich mc
              > >
              >
            • bikealfa
              If the wheel moves in the dropout while riding, your big concern will be the tire rubbing the left side chain stay. BTDT. The cure is to tighten the axle
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 20, 2013
                If the wheel moves in the dropout while riding, your big concern will be the tire rubbing the left side chain stay. BTDT. The cure is to tighten the axle nuts harder.

                Remember that ALL IGH bikes up to ~1980 (or maybe a lot more recent) had horizontal dropouts, and this was NOT an issue. Decades of English 3 speeds.

                Michael Wilson
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