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Re: Modern S-A bare hub shell source?

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  • bikealfa
    Old email I know, but I wanted to know - What project would want a new hub shell but not the internals? As you may be able to discern from my posts, I am
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 12, 2013
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      Old email I know, but I wanted to know -
      What project would want a new hub shell but not the internals?

      As you may be able to discern from my posts, I am interested in unusual bike projects, even if they are not what I would do for myself.


      Michael Wilson

      --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "pj" wrote:
      >
      > I'm in the process of mid-range planning for a project in which I'll need a S-A p.n. HSA600 S-RF3 36 hole hub shell.
      >
      > Does anybody know a source for these? (I think every part for these S-A three-speeds is available except the hub shell!)
      >
      > My default alternative would be to just buy a complete S-RF3, use that hub shell for my project and part the rest of it out.
      >
      > pj
      >
    • pj
      ... I have a 1952 AM and I d like to migrate the internal mechanism into a modern aluminum shell, like this:
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 13, 2013
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        > What project would want a new hub shell but not the internals?

        I have a 1952 AM and I'd like to migrate the internal mechanism into a modern aluminum shell, like this:

        <http://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=17531.msg314519>
      • bikealfa
        I really liked the AM when I was stronger. Very simple design and nice ratios. Similarly I liked the FM ratios, but the design is nowhere near as simple.
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 17, 2013
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          I really liked the AM when I was stronger. Very simple design and nice ratios. Similarly I liked the FM ratios, but the design is nowhere near as simple. However I moved to the S5 because I recognized that the ratios, while not as nice, were acceptable, and there were more gears and the parts were at the time brand new.

          The hub in the picture looks brand-new. Much better than the AMs I have which work but show lots of wear.

          My father had K series hubs which used the dogs on the planet cage like the AM; he had a lot of wear issues and much preferred the new (to him) AW hub because he could change the planet pinions easily, and even then I do not think he ever had to do that. His problems may have been from a previous owner or from being a teenager who was strong but not initially skilled in the art of keeping the shift cables adjusted; I started my AM life already knowing the possible problems. This paragraph is in response to the website comments about the clutch engagement.


          Michael Wilson

          --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "pj" wrote:
          >
          > > What project would want a new hub shell but not the internals?
          >
          > I have a 1952 AM and I'd like to migrate the internal mechanism into a modern aluminum shell, like this:
          >
          >
          >
        • Hrothgar19
          That was my YACF post (by the way, the AM is still running fine in the SRF3 shell, and it goes up and over the Chilterns quite regularly). I now find myself in
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 21, 2013
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            That was my YACF post (by the way, the AM is still running fine in the SRF3 shell, and it goes up and over the Chilterns quite regularly).

            I now find myself in need of a 36h HSA 600 shell too; to re-shell a 1950 ASC which had a cracked flange on its original 40h alloy shell and was therefore only 40 quid on eBay. I've removed the ASC's all-important left cup, which can be press fitted into any A-series shell, even a threaded one, to the detriment of the threads, but I'd prefer to use another alloy one rather than a nasty AW steel shell.

            I've asked SJSC and Old Bike Trader is also trying to find one. Worst case scenario is going to involve buying a whole SRF3 and junking the internals. My last SRF3 shell came from a complete new Merc (dubious Brompton clone) wheel which was only 40 GBP.

            SA spares availability is surprisingly bad in the UK. The US gets parts we can't, such as the 175mm axle for the SRC3 (essential if you want to put one in a 135mm rear end).

            rogerzilla

            --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "bikealfa" <mtwils@...> wrote:
            >
            > I really liked the AM when I was stronger. Very simple design and nice ratios. Similarly I liked the FM ratios, but the design is nowhere near as simple. However I moved to the S5 because I recognized that the ratios, while not as nice, were acceptable, and there were more gears and the parts were at the time brand new.
            >
            > The hub in the picture looks brand-new. Much better than the AMs I have which work but show lots of wear.
            >
            > My father had K series hubs which used the dogs on the planet cage like the AM; he had a lot of wear issues and much preferred the new (to him) AW hub because he could change the planet pinions easily, and even then I do not think he ever had to do that. His problems may have been from a previous owner or from being a teenager who was strong but not initially skilled in the art of keeping the shift cables adjusted; I started my AM life already knowing the possible problems. This paragraph is in response to the website comments about the clutch engagement.
            >
            >
            > Michael Wilson
            >
            > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "pj" wrote:
            > >
            > > > What project would want a new hub shell but not the internals?
            > >
            > > I have a 1952 AM and I'd like to migrate the internal mechanism into a modern aluminum shell, like this:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
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