Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: milling machine projects

Expand Messages
  • bikealfa
    I added 2 pictures of the 30 tooth sprocket installed on a 110 bcd crank to the mwilson photo album. No I did not disassemble it and show a picture of the
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 7, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      I added 2 pictures of the 30 tooth sprocket installed on a 110 bcd crank to the mwilson photo album. No I did not disassemble it and show a picture of the machined part in free air.

      Michael Wilson

      --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "bikealfa" <mtwils@...> wrote:
      >
      > I know the basic sprocket machining is easy; when I had machine shop access I used to do this sort of thing myself.
      >
      > Yes I know tooling is expensive. It is also something you will not have when you want to use the machine, so you will have to order it and wait, or have spent a lot more to have tooling you will probably never use. Several reasons why I have not yet bought a milling machine.
      >
      > Project details:
      > 2) remachine the shimano cassette sprocket holder for narrower sprocket spacing and 3 mm inset, for 12 sprockets on my TT bike
      >
      > Cassettes have inidvidual sprockets and aluminum carriers. This is remachining the aluminum carrier so it sits 3 mm further onto the wheel - fits ZIPP disk wheels - and has narrower sprocket spacing.
      >
      > 5) make the adaptors and machine the 30t chainrings that allow me to put a 30t chainring on a 110bcd crank. I have one set, I want more. This allows a 30t chainring on a Clavicula crank, and also on a 110bcd powermeter crank like a Quark or an SRM.
      >
      > No this is NOT a triplizer. This is a replacement bolt set, and a 30 t sprocket (we used a Sugino 74 bcd) remachined to fit over the steps of a 110bcd crank, and with 105 mm bcd and 4 mm countersunk bolts. The bolt set has the offset hole tapped for the 4 mm bolts, and the same shape for the large chainring as a traditional crank bolt - 10 mm base diameter and 12 mm shoulder to fit the counterbore. This also requires filing the crank arm spider so the chain can sit on the 30 sprocket correctly.
      >
      > Why the 30t on 110bcd?
      > 1) I like narrow crank spacing
      > 2) I like to put my large 46t chainring at the center of the cassette, so it works better with the large rear cassette cog.
      > 3) Superlight cranks (until the Lightning) were 110 bcd and I needed a 30-34 for Mt Washington hillclimb and did not want to change the cranks on my 13 pound road bike to something heavier
      > 4) Similarly power meter cranks are 110 bcd and this allows 30t rings on power meter cranks with good sprocket spacing
      > 5) The look is cleaner than the VO/TA 50.4 bcd and the 94 bcd cranks are hard to set up - they want a 100 or 98 mm length square taper BB spindle to put the cranks where I want them.
      >
      > Why not?
      > You can buy for $200 a square taper crankset that has 30-46 sprockets, can take anything from 26-60 sprockets (24 if you drill it yourself), and has a stated width of 147 mm which means 140 mm when I set it up my way.
      > You can buy TA cranks for $400 or so and set them up more-or-less exactly the way you want.
      > You can buy Lightning cranks and a 94bcd spider and set it up with standard road sprocket positions.
      >
      > Michael Wilson
      >
    • Alex Wetmore
      Thanks for those photos. It would be great to see one more zoomed out to show the whole crank. I don t understand how the large ring is attached to the crank
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 7, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks for those photos. It would be great to see one more zoomed out to show the whole crank. I don't understand how the large ring is attached to the crank (I assume via the normal 110mm bolt circle) and how the small is attached to the large ring.

        In trade I can share this photo of an adapter that a friend designed and that I cnc'd to fit 110/74 chainrings in a double configuration to a TA Cyclotouriste crank:
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/88336152@N00/sets/72157628992155411/

        I made one for myself too, but haven't used it yet. I have a fairly large collection of 94mm BCD cranks that I run as doubles when I want this type of gearing.

        alex
        ________________________________________
        From: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com [Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of bikealfa [mtwils@...]
        Sent: Friday, December 07, 2012 6:16 AM
        To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: milling machine projects

        I added 2 pictures of the 30 tooth sprocket installed on a 110 bcd crank to the mwilson photo album. No I did not disassemble it and show a picture of the machined part in free air.

        Michael Wilson

        --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "bikealfa" <mtwils@...> wrote:
        >
        > I know the basic sprocket machining is easy; when I had machine shop access I used to do this sort of thing myself.
        >
        > Yes I know tooling is expensive. It is also something you will not have when you want to use the machine, so you will have to order it and wait, or have spent a lot more to have tooling you will probably never use. Several reasons why I have not yet bought a milling machine.
        >
        > Project details:
        > 2) remachine the shimano cassette sprocket holder for narrower sprocket spacing and 3 mm inset, for 12 sprockets on my TT bike
        >
        > Cassettes have inidvidual sprockets and aluminum carriers. This is remachining the aluminum carrier so it sits 3 mm further onto the wheel - fits ZIPP disk wheels - and has narrower sprocket spacing.
        >
        > 5) make the adaptors and machine the 30t chainrings that allow me to put a 30t chainring on a 110bcd crank. I have one set, I want more. This allows a 30t chainring on a Clavicula crank, and also on a 110bcd powermeter crank like a Quark or an SRM.
        >
        > No this is NOT a triplizer. This is a replacement bolt set, and a 30 t sprocket (we used a Sugino 74 bcd) remachined to fit over the steps of a 110bcd crank, and with 105 mm bcd and 4 mm countersunk bolts. The bolt set has the offset hole tapped for the 4 mm bolts, and the same shape for the large chainring as a traditional crank bolt - 10 mm base diameter and 12 mm shoulder to fit the counterbore. This also requires filing the crank arm spider so the chain can sit on the 30 sprocket correctly.
        >
        > Why the 30t on 110bcd?
        > 1) I like narrow crank spacing
        > 2) I like to put my large 46t chainring at the center of the cassette, so it works better with the large rear cassette cog.
        > 3) Superlight cranks (until the Lightning) were 110 bcd and I needed a 30-34 for Mt Washington hillclimb and did not want to change the cranks on my 13 pound road bike to something heavier
        > 4) Similarly power meter cranks are 110 bcd and this allows 30t rings on power meter cranks with good sprocket spacing
        > 5) The look is cleaner than the VO/TA 50.4 bcd and the 94 bcd cranks are hard to set up - they want a 100 or 98 mm length square taper BB spindle to put the cranks where I want them.
        >
        > Why not?
        > You can buy for $200 a square taper crankset that has 30-46 sprockets, can take anything from 26-60 sprockets (24 if you drill it yourself), and has a stated width of 147 mm which means 140 mm when I set it up my way.
        > You can buy TA cranks for $400 or so and set them up more-or-less exactly the way you want.
        > You can buy Lightning cranks and a 94bcd spider and set it up with standard road sprocket positions.
        >
        > Michael Wilson
        >




        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • bikealfa
        I added two more pictures, one of just the adaptors and one of the outer ring. I took it apart so I could make some tools to drill out aluminum chainring bolt
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 8, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          I added two more pictures, one of just the adaptors and one of the outer ring.

          I took it apart so I could make some tools to drill out aluminum chainring bolt sets and convert a few more cranks. Unfortunately one of the bolts stripped the allen, so I cannot use the 30t sprocket as a template yet. I am loathe to point the oxyacetylene torch at it because the cranks are aluminum. The only need for disassembly is to use the sprocket as a template.

          I did this because the Bob Jackson bottom bracket threads were not clean enough to accept the Lighning aluminum cups, so some other solution was desired - the adaptors, or the TA or VO Grand Cru cranks, or a bottom bracket rethreading tool (100 pounds from UK is the least expensive I have seen). Nothing will work this weekend though.

          If you do a small production run of the 110/74 adaptors I would buy 1.


          Michael Wilson

          --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Alex Wetmore <alex@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks for those photos. It would be great to see one more zoomed out to show the whole crank. I don't understand how the large ring is attached to the crank (I assume via the normal 110mm bolt circle) and how the small is attached to the large ring.
          >
          > In trade I can share this photo of an adapter that a friend designed and that I cnc'd to fit 110/74 chainrings in a double configuration to a TA Cyclotouriste crank:
          > http://www.flickr.com/photos/88336152@N00/sets/72157628992155411/
          >
          > I made one for myself too, but haven't used it yet. I have a fairly large collection of 94mm BCD cranks that I run as doubles when I want this type of gearing.
          >
          > alex
          > ________________________________________
          > From: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com [Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of bikealfa [mtwils@...]
          > Sent: Friday, December 07, 2012 6:16 AM
          > To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: milling machine projects
          >
          > I added 2 pictures of the 30 tooth sprocket installed on a 110 bcd crank to the mwilson photo album. No I did not disassemble it and show a picture of the machined part in free air.
          >
          > Michael Wilson
          >
          > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "bikealfa" <mtwils@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I know the basic sprocket machining is easy; when I had machine shop access I used to do this sort of thing myself.
          > >
          > > Yes I know tooling is expensive. It is also something you will not have when you want to use the machine, so you will have to order it and wait, or have spent a lot more to have tooling you will probably never use. Several reasons why I have not yet bought a milling machine.
          > >
          > > Project details:
          > > 2) remachine the shimano cassette sprocket holder for narrower sprocket spacing and 3 mm inset, for 12 sprockets on my TT bike
          > >
          > > Cassettes have inidvidual sprockets and aluminum carriers. This is remachining the aluminum carrier so it sits 3 mm further onto the wheel - fits ZIPP disk wheels - and has narrower sprocket spacing.
          > >
          > > 5) make the adaptors and machine the 30t chainrings that allow me to put a 30t chainring on a 110bcd crank. I have one set, I want more. This allows a 30t chainring on a Clavicula crank, and also on a 110bcd powermeter crank like a Quark or an SRM.
          > >
          > > No this is NOT a triplizer. This is a replacement bolt set, and a 30 t sprocket (we used a Sugino 74 bcd) remachined to fit over the steps of a 110bcd crank, and with 105 mm bcd and 4 mm countersunk bolts. The bolt set has the offset hole tapped for the 4 mm bolts, and the same shape for the large chainring as a traditional crank bolt - 10 mm base diameter and 12 mm shoulder to fit the counterbore. This also requires filing the crank arm spider so the chain can sit on the 30 sprocket correctly.
          > >
          > > Why the 30t on 110bcd?
          > > 1) I like narrow crank spacing
          > > 2) I like to put my large 46t chainring at the center of the cassette, so it works better with the large rear cassette cog.
          > > 3) Superlight cranks (until the Lightning) were 110 bcd and I needed a 30-34 for Mt Washington hillclimb and did not want to change the cranks on my 13 pound road bike to something heavier
          > > 4) Similarly power meter cranks are 110 bcd and this allows 30t rings on power meter cranks with good sprocket spacing
          > > 5) The look is cleaner than the VO/TA 50.4 bcd and the 94 bcd cranks are hard to set up - they want a 100 or 98 mm length square taper BB spindle to put the cranks where I want them.
          > >
          > > Why not?
          > > You can buy for $200 a square taper crankset that has 30-46 sprockets, can take anything from 26-60 sprockets (24 if you drill it yourself), and has a stated width of 147 mm which means 140 mm when I set it up my way.
          > > You can buy TA cranks for $400 or so and set them up more-or-less exactly the way you want.
          > > You can buy Lightning cranks and a 94bcd spider and set it up with standard road sprocket positions.
          > >
          > > Michael Wilson
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.