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Re: Off topic: About knees and gear-inches

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  • David Dannenberg
    For some purposes cycling is considered non-weight bearing exercise--which goes to the point made that biking in any gear is better on the knees than other
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 6, 2012
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      For some purposes cycling is considered "non-weight bearing" exercise--which goes to the point made that biking in any gear is better on the knees than other forms of exercise or sports--running, basketball, etc.

      I read an article a year or two ago that cautioned against engaging in too much cycling without mixing in some weight bearing exercise because of evidence of osteoporosis among some top cyclists--guys in their early 30s were suffering fractured hips in relatively mild cycling accidents. Mountain biking according to the article does provide more weight-bearing exercise I suppose due to varied terrain and time up out of the saddle.

      David Dannenberg
    • Samantha Eastman
      I had an accident and was run over by a car on my left leg and knee in May this year.  I fell sideways and it did not break the knee but the car tyre itself
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 7, 2012
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        I had an accident and was run over by a car on my left leg and knee in May this year.  I fell sideways and it did not break the knee but the car tyre itself rolled over the joint and leg itself.  I have anterior tibialis tendonitis which means dodgy tendon issues and some joint annoyance still.  But in this time I was also without a car, another issue from June till August.  I actually found that walking and going up stairs, because of the pronation of the foot was the most painful weight bearing things that I had to do daily.  As I was used to walking on average 4 miles daily I found this troublesome.  But having to then take up the bicycle when without a car actually helped the area heal and strengthen whilst being able to still keep fit, and support the areas needed.  I would say some terrain was better; uphill was always an issue more as this was more pressure with the knee and leg and would obviously cause exacerbation.  But I definitely noticed that the regular  ten mile to twenty daily cycle ride was helpful.  I now have a car and have gone down to a more leisurely pace again but am keeping up with the cycling due to the benefits I noticed when having to cycle for the commute and school runs, not just to get fit and mental time out.  

        Anyway that's my thoughts on knees and cycling.  

        Samantha
      • freetobike2012
        Ok...I read the posters comment on most competitive cyclists being out of the game by their mid 30s Unsure whom you ride with or where sir; but club racing
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 8, 2012
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          Ok...I read the posters comment on 'most competitive cyclists being out of the game by their mid 30s'
          Unsure whom you ride with or where sir; but club racing is a large sport attracting hundreds of cyclists many well into their 50s and 60s. And these folks DO climb.
          If you want to know who the former club racers are on a meet, simply look for the folks with braces on a knee or the ones who walk like ducks out of water (due to knee issues).
          (no offense intended to the OP..just an observation from someone who wishes we'd had compact cranksets and close spaced 10 cog gearing 30 years ago.)
          Rich mc


          --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear Rip van Winkle, 'pleased that you've awakened and are now able to reply to my months-old posting regarding tall gears and their affect on knees.
          >
          > I commend your club archivist for keeping such meticulous records! However, those records do not speak to my assertion as there seems to be no indication of  the number of years individual member rode in such high gears, etc. Also, you seem to be speaking of competitive cycling. Now we all know that such cyclists rarely stay on their bikes after age 30, this perhaps for reasons of knee difficulty or more likely the deleterious affects of  the long-term usage of performance enhancing drugs!
          >
          > I think what is needed here is a longitudinal study of a group of high-gear riders.
          >
          > By the way, I've cycled daily since the age of seven, have daily commute of fifteen miles, and cover 50 to 70 miles on Saturdays with my club. And of course all riding is done in gears under 70". 
          >
          >   Al in Philadelphia,  
          >  
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: simon 1967 <simonw1967@...>
          > To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 7:34 PM
          > Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Off topic: About knees and gear-inches
          >
          >
          >  
          >
          > That is a very provocative assertion?
          > Your statement that certain cyclists are not members of this list and therefore implicitly have knee problems is very rash.
          > 70+ years ago the average person was physically a lot smaller, and nowhere near as strong, the average bike and its components were much less sophisticated, and certainly much heavier.
          > Trolling though my local club achieves shows that average speeds and times are far better now-a days than 'back then' across ALL age groups.
          > Nor least due to fact that Bike design and build has come a long way since WW11, and that training and coaching programmers are far more sophisticated. Those active member in the club of similar age (60-70) to you are riding bikes with MUCH taller gearing than there predecessors, and still making better times. Knee problems and other muscular skeletal issues that accompany aging are a fact of life.
          > The underlying reason why some suffer biomechanical degradation earlier may be due to congenital factors, others may be from simple over use.
          > The reason why you knees are allegedly still fine will more likely be due to you having never ridden as far, or as hard, or as for long?
          >
          > Simon.
          >
          >
          > --- In mailto:Geared_hub_bikes%40yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@> wrote:
          > >
          > >  There have been several interesting replies to my contention that those who use high gears will ultimately damage their knees. Interestingly enough all of these replies counter my contention. Where then are those who are in agreement with me?  The answer is quite simple: they are not members of this group and are no longer cyclists because of knee problems!
          > >
          > >    Al in Philadelphia, who rarely uses more than 70 gear-inches and is still painlessly cycling daily at 70
          > >
          >
        • stephen lewis
          Thanks gentlemen. Had my annual medical yesterday with a fit looking doctor half my age. Apparently I need to lose 10kg - that s 20lbs! That was my weight 30
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 9, 2012
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            Thanks gentlemen.
            Had my annual medical yesterday with a fit looking doctor half my age. Apparently I need to lose 10kg - that's 20lbs! That was my weight 30 years ago...
            Anyway, he was expecting to see more wear and tear on the knees after all these years in the saddle, but apart from a bit of creaking all's well - thanks to the degree of movement that shimano spd pedals allow this old bloke. maybe that's more important than gear inches???
            When I told him though that I needed to have another surgery to get rid of 2 trigger fingers, he did not blink! Any of you - er -  older gentlemen - suffer from " sticky fingers"? Any hints to ease the problem?
            Please ignore me if this is too far off topic!
            Thanks for all the wisdom
            Stephen

            From: freetobike2012 <freetobike2012@...>
            To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, 9 December 2012, 0:34
            Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Off topic: About knees and gear-inches
             
            Ok...I read the posters comment on 'most competitive cyclists being out of the game by their mid 30s'
            Unsure whom you ride with or where sir; but club racing is a large sport attracting hundreds of cyclists many well into their 50s and 60s. And these folks DO climb.
            If you want to know who the former club racers are on a meet, simply look for the folks with braces on a knee or the ones who walk like ducks out of water (due to knee issues).
            (no offense intended to the OP..just an observation from someone who wishes we'd had compact cranksets and close spaced 10 cog gearing 30 years ago.)
            Rich mc

            --- In mailto:Geared_hub_bikes%40yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@...> wrote:
            >
            > Dear Rip van Winkle, 'pleased that you've awakened and are now able to reply to my months-old posting regarding tall gears and their affect on knees.
            >
            > I commend your club archivist for keeping such meticulous records! However, those records do not speak to my assertion as there seems to be no indication of  the number of years individual member rode in such high gears, etc. Also, you seem to be speaking of competitive cycling. Now we all know that such cyclists rarely stay on their bikes after age 30, this perhaps for reasons of knee difficulty or more likely the deleterious affects of  the long-term usage of performance enhancing drugs!
            >
            > I think what is needed here is a longitudinal study of a group of high-gear riders.
            >
            > By the way, I've cycled daily since the age of seven, have daily commute of fifteen miles, and cover 50 to 70 miles on Saturdays with my club. And of course all riding is done in gears under 70". 
            >
            >   Al in Philadelphia,  
            >  
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: simon 1967 <simonw1967@...>
            > To: mailto:Geared_hub_bikes%40yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 7:34 PM
            > Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Off topic: About knees and gear-inches
            >
            >
            >  
            >
            > That is a very provocative assertion?
            > Your statement that certain cyclists are not members of this list and therefore implicitly have knee problems is very rash.
            > 70+ years ago the average person was physically a lot smaller, and nowhere near as strong, the average bike and its components were much less sophisticated, and certainly much heavier.
            > Trolling though my local club achieves shows that average speeds and times are far better now-a days than 'back then' across ALL age groups.
            > Nor least due to fact that Bike design and build has come a long way since WW11, and that training and coaching programmers are far more sophisticated. Those active member in the club of similar age (60-70) to you are riding bikes with MUCH taller gearing than there predecessors, and still making better times. Knee problems and other muscular skeletal issues that accompany aging are a fact of life.
            > The underlying reason why some suffer biomechanical degradation earlier may be due to congenital factors, others may be from simple over use.
            > The reason why you knees are allegedly still fine will more likely be due to you having never ridden as far, or as hard, or as for long?
            >
            > Simon.
            >
            >
            > --- In mailto:Geared_hub_bikes%40yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@> wrote:
            > >
            > >  There have been several interesting replies to my contention that those who use high gears will ultimately damage their knees. Interestingly enough all of these replies counter my contention. Where then are those who are in agreement with me?  The answer is quite simple: they are not members of this group and are no longer cyclists because of knee problems!
            > >
            > >    Al in Philadelphia, who rarely uses more than 70 gear-inches and is still painlessly cycling daily at 70
            > >
            >

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