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Re: [Geared_hub_bikes] Off Topic: A Cool Bike Powered Grain Grinder

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  • Keith Barlow
    I ve seen bike powered smoothie makers at several events here in the UK, like the ones these people hire out: http://www.lovesmoothiebike.co.uk/our-products/
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 5, 2012
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      I've seen bike powered smoothie makers at several events here in the UK, like the ones these people hire out:

      http://www.lovesmoothiebike.co.uk/our-products/

      and a TV program here a couple of years ago did a piece where they tried to provide electricity for a house from a large array of exercise/trainer bikes. They called "The Human Power Station"' and there's a web page on it here:

      http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00p8469

      (that may only work for people in the UK)

      On 5 Dec 2012, at 21:21, "just3slickgears" <jimbofla1138@...> wrote:

      > I happened upon this video from Mother Earth News showing a high-end heirloom quality grain mill that can be powered by bike. It costs about $1200 for the setup with shipping, but for cyclists who used stat trainers and were into the kind of cooking which uses rare, fresh ground grain, this puppy would be money I bet.
      >
      > I was wondering if anyone in group is using or knows of other bike powered machines? I remember an online article recently about health clubs generating power via their exercise bikes and treadmills.
      >
      > The video demands a preceding advertisement, and much of it is devoted to the presenters going on about the red corn they're grinding, the machine is highlighted at 3:45 in.
      >
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LktGcH0Kh6E&feature=fvsr
      >
      > jim / so fla.
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • anthonyeberger
      This is a great idea but why on earth does it cost 1200 bucks? It s a bike trainer with a grain mill attached to it. I see at least 5 trainers for sale on
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 6, 2012
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        This is a great idea but why on earth does it cost 1200 bucks? It's a bike trainer with a grain mill attached to it. I see at least 5 trainers for sale on Craigslist every week. I bought mine for 25 bucks after the PO never used it (Oddly enough, I rarely do too). I've seen many an older grain mill for nearly the same price.

        I supposed if you don't DIY sometimes you better be ready to pay for those that do.

        Nice idea though. MREA has a group each year that does all kinds of bike powered stuff. One that sticks out is a stationary bike that was used to run a pump to clean water. It also ran a small TV screen to keep children interested while they rode.

        Tony B.
        Riverwest WI

        --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "just3slickgears" <jimbofla1138@...> wrote:
        >
        > I happened upon this video from Mother Earth News showing a high-end heirloom quality grain mill that can be powered by bike. It costs about $1200 for the setup with shipping, but for cyclists who used stat trainers and were into the kind of cooking which uses rare, fresh ground grain, this puppy would be money I bet.
        >
        > I was wondering if anyone in group is using or knows of other bike powered machines? I remember an online article recently about health clubs generating power via their exercise bikes and treadmills.
        >
        > The video demands a preceding advertisement, and much of it is devoted to the presenters going on about the red corn they're grinding, the machine is highlighted at 3:45 in.
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LktGcH0Kh6E&feature=fvsr
        >
        > jim / so fla.
        >
      • jim
        ...   I think it s mostly the Prius effect:  the owners have a real cool, really green toy/tool and the discretionary money to purchase and store it.
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 6, 2012
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          >>This is a great idea but why on earth does it cost 1200 bucks? It's a bike trainer with a grain mill attached to it.
           
          I think it's mostly the "Prius" effect:  the owners have a real cool, really "green" toy/tool and the discretionary money to purchase and store it. Being listed in Williams-Sonoma's catalog means this is something athletic foodies can be certain is very good quality and proudly show off or lend to their friends.
           
          And since it's clearly not the most practical machine for modern lives with 110 volt outlets every 8 feet by building code requirement in most homes, there's not gonna be a lot of these sold in tract house suburbia.  Which means not alot of per-unit savings possibilities in the production run life due to economies of scale. 
           
          Finally, it does appear to be very well made, and is the rare tool made in the good 'ole USA these days. All factors boosting and supporting a high price point.
           
          Given that "they" can make, import and sell in retail outlets 5 horsepower internal combustion engine powered water pumps for well under $200 these days, I think it's a safe bet that materials costs are not a big part of the price.  None of the bearing or grinding surfaces in this would seemingly be subjected to greater stresses than our IGH hubs have to endure when we're hammering on the pedals or grunting up a hill.
           
          I could see this being a popular thing at a health food store, farmers market or food co-op where people could buy and then grind their own heirloom or otherwise special grains.  I bet there'd be cyclists happily lined up waiting to use it on Saturday mornings when the weather permitted riding.
           >>  MREA has a group each year that does all kinds of bike powered stuff.
           
          Thanks for the tip on the Midwest Renewable Energy Association -- I just gave it a quick search and it looks quite interesting.
           
          jim / so. fla.
           
           
          ===
           

          From: anthonyeberger <anthonyeberger@...>
          To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2012 7:57 AM
          Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Off Topic: A Cool Bike Powered Grain Grinder
           
          This is a great idea but why on earth does it cost 1200 bucks? It's a bike trainer with a grain mill attached to it. I see at least 5 trainers for sale on Craigslist every week. I bought mine for 25 bucks after the PO never used it (Oddly enough, I rarely do too). I've seen many an older grain mill for nearly the same price.

          I supposed if you don't DIY sometimes you better be ready to pay for those that do.

          Nice idea though. MREA has a group each year that does all kinds of bike powered stuff. One that sticks out is a stationary bike that was used to run a pump to clean water. It also ran a small TV screen to keep children interested while they rode.

          Tony B.
          Riverwest WI

          --- In mailto:Geared_hub_bikes%40yahoogroups.com, "just3slickgears" <jimbofla1138@...> wrote:
          >
          > I happened upon this video from Mother Earth News showing a high-end heirloom quality grain mill that can be powered by bike. It costs about $1200 for the setup with shipping, but for cyclists who used stat trainers and were into the kind of cooking which uses rare, fresh ground grain, this puppy would be money I bet.
          >
          > I was wondering if anyone in group is using or knows of other bike powered machines? I remember an online article recently about health clubs generating power via their exercise bikes and treadmills.
          >
          > The video demands a preceding advertisement, and much of it is devoted to the presenters going on about the red corn they're grinding, the machine is highlighted at 3:45 in.
          >
          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LktGcH0Kh6E&feature=fvsr
          >
          > jim / so fla.
          >

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