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RE: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Shifter mount

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  • Paulos, Richard G
    You remember those early Gripshift shifters were VERY noisy. Scott Dickson was a Gripshift sponsored racer and he would have to drop to the back of a pack out
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 31, 2012
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      You remember those early Gripshift shifters were VERY noisy. Scott Dickson was a Gripshift sponsored racer and he would have to drop to the back of a pack out of ear shot to upshift prior to his inevitable attack.

      Rick.

      ________________________________________
      From: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com [Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of aarons_bicycle_repair [aaron@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2012 5:11 PM
      To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Shifter mount

      Back in the day (aka 1988)
      a new company called Gripshift came around to bike shops and gave the employees free shifters. They came in different models for different brand derailleurs and they came with collars for different size handlebars. I installed them on my road drop bars. The cables came out the front like a normal bar-con. You would tape over part of the housing like a standard modern barcon too. The housing left the shifter right at the bar surface.

      I found them quite natural. One bennefit was that I could shift out of the saddle with my knee. The index shifting made that possible. I could also dump gears quickly during a hill transition.
      The very first Gripshift I ever saw was red hard plastic. The free-to-shop employees were black. I remember you had to install the foam grip tape yourself. Later they came factory installed and later still rubber.

      I think if Rohloff is listening, they could go to a community or used bike shop, find an example of the first Gripshift and copy the design for road use. It would look much better and be more ergonomic and sleek than the current shifter with a Hubbub.

      --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Geared_hub_bikes%40yahoogroups.com>, "bikealfa" <mtwils@...> wrote:
      >
      > I fail to comprehend how anyone can use a twist shifter on a dropped bar in any position.
    • aarons_bicycle_repair
      Actually, I don t remember them being noisy at all! I followed the included instructions and used Vasaline (well I used Neosporine since it came in a handy
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 1, 2012
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        Actually, I don't remember them being noisy at all!
        I followed the included instructions and used Vasaline (well I used Neosporine since it came in a handy tube and did not want my shifters to get an infection!). This was before SRAM introduced Jonnisnot. The petroleum jelly silenced the shifters.

        This reminds me of a common occurrence in our shop. A customer walks his race bike in the door and all we can hear is click-click-click from his back wheel. Some are quite loud. We tell him if he knows they should be silent. 5 minutes and some Phil Wood Oil and he (or she) is quite amazed! The rear wheel spins faster and with NO NOISE! Most hubs come with little or zero lube in the freewheel mechanism. Many IGH too. For example, I just opened the freewheel ratchet on a NuVinci 360 and it had no lube at all. On those hubs mix a little grease in with the Phil Wood Oil, or just use Phil Grease. that mechanism is not well sealed and I expect many to rust out due to NuVinci's lack of factory lube. It is very easy to lube an N360. Just use a pokey-spoke to remove the little clip and pull off the freehub body.

        Lack of factory lube is done for one reason: So lube will not leak out during shipping. The hub maker boxes up the hubs and ships them to the wheel building factory and then the wheel building factory ships them to the bike builder or distributor(or they sit on a shelf in the same warehouse until needed). Either way they sit in cardboard boxes.
        It is up to the final assemble of the bicycle to ensure enough lube is where it needs to be. Since bicycle seals are weak because humans are week compared to internal combustion, it is totally NORMAL for some lube to leak out of any bearing. A dry rag is your tool there!

        --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "Paulos, Richard G" <rick-paulos@...> wrote:
        >
        > You remember those early Gripshift shifters were VERY noisy. Scott Dickson was a Gripshift sponsored racer and he would have to drop to the back of a pack out of ear shot to upshift prior to his inevitable attack.
        >
        > Rick.
        >
        > ________________________________________
        > From: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com [Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of aarons_bicycle_repair [aaron@...]
        > Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2012 5:11 PM
        > To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Shifter mount
        >
        > Back in the day (aka 1988)
        > a new company called Gripshift came around to bike shops and gave the employees free shifters. They came in different models for different brand derailleurs and they came with collars for different size handlebars. I installed them on my road drop bars. The cables came out the front like a normal bar-con. You would tape over part of the housing like a standard modern barcon too. The housing left the shifter right at the bar surface.
        >
        > I found them quite natural. One bennefit was that I could shift out of the saddle with my knee. The index shifting made that possible. I could also dump gears quickly during a hill transition.
        > The very first Gripshift I ever saw was red hard plastic. The free-to-shop employees were black. I remember you had to install the foam grip tape yourself. Later they came factory installed and later still rubber.
        >
        > I think if Rohloff is listening, they could go to a community or used bike shop, find an example of the first Gripshift and copy the design for road use. It would look much better and be more ergonomic and sleek than the current shifter with a Hubbub.
        >
        > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Geared_hub_bikes%40yahoogroups.com>, "bikealfa" <mtwils@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I fail to comprehend how anyone can use a twist shifter on a dropped bar in any position.
        >
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