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Off topic: An inexpensive light

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  • Al
      With the days becoming shorter and many of us who use our hub-gear equipped bikes into the night hours for transport, I thought that I d share this
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 16, 2012
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      With the days becoming shorter and many of us who use our hub-gear equipped bikes into the night hours for transport, I thought that I'd share this approach to lighting.  

         I spent $3.27 to equip my everyday rider with a front-light. It's a 24 L.E.D unit powered by AAA-cells and was purchased on sale from Harbor Freight Tools. While

      not specifically


      manufactured as a light for cycles, it works at the task quite well. Of course a small bit of ingenuity was involved in securing it to the cycle.

      Now for those so interested, it is Harbor Freight Tools item #67227

      Al in Philadelphia



         
    • dr2chase@mac.com
      Doesn t look bright enough to engrave your initials on drivers retinas, so not for me. My cheap hack, cheap enough that I also have low beams , uses a few
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 16, 2012
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        Doesn't look bright enough to engrave your initials on drivers' retinas, so not for me.

        My cheap hack, cheap enough that I also have "low beams", uses a few power LEDs (CREE), a current regulator, lenses, aluminum angle stock, and acrylic mirrors.

        Here, I just put some pictures up, one of them is all annotated.
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/dr2chase/sets/72157631788069577/

        David

        On 2012-10-16, at 9:32 PM, Al <k3eax@...> wrote:
        > With the days becoming shorter and many of us who use our hub-gear equipped bikes into the night hours for transport, I thought that I'd share this approach to lighting.
        >
        > I spent $3.27 to equip my everyday rider with a front-light. It's a 24 L.E.D unit powered by AAA-cells and was purchased on sale from Harbor Freight Tools. While not specifically
        >
        >
        > manufactured as a light for cycles, it works at the task quite well. Of course a small bit of ingenuity was involved in securing it to the cycle.
        >
        > Now for those so interested, it is Harbor Freight Tools item #67227
      • jim
        I ve got a few of those Harbor Freight 67227, they help my old eyes on closeup work and I like that the magnet on the back keeps it handy on the bike repair
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 16, 2012
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          I've got a few of those Harbor Freight 67227, they help my old eyes on closeup work and I like that the magnet on the back keeps it handy on the bike repair stand or on the front door when I head out for some nighttime chore.  When the batts are new or charged up they are quite bright enough to catch a driver's attention, but don't throw the light as far as a light with a more curved and focused reflector and they do dim down considerable after a bit.  Also, for traffic I really like a front light that flashes, throws some decent side illumination and shows a bit of light back so that I can know it's still burning. 
           
          I've been impressed with how well even a smaller flashing bike light catches attention when I'm out driving. My ideal setup is two, one flashing and one steady, since  they cost so little, and my rechargeable batteries die of old age before they live through their lifespan of charge/dis cycles.  Just makles sense to have a backup around auto traffic.
           
           There are some pretty good, very cheap 6 and 9 LED flashers available on eBay, often shipped free from as far away as Hong Kong for under $5.  The Bell "Dawn Rider" that sells for about $9 at Mal-Wart has three quite bright LEDs, side illumination, a flashing function, and can be verified from the seat.. The weak link is the handlebar clamp, it won't take as many remove/replace cycles as it should, which I have found to be the major flaws in the cheapos.  Bell claims 65 steady/350 flashing hours for it, haven't worn the first set of cells out yet so I cannot say.
           
          I had two 6 volt, 10 watt Nighthawk halogen headlights with heavy SLA batteries before --  strong enough that oncoming drivers would flash me with their brights -- which pretty much defeated the utility of having real good lighting on the bow.
           
           

          From: Al <k3eax@...>
          To: "Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com" <Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 9:32 PM
          Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Off topic: An inexpensive light
           
           
          With the days becoming shorter and many of us who use our hub-gear equipped bikes into the night hours for transport, I thought that I'd share this approach to lighting.      I spent $3.27 to equip my everyday rider with a front-light. It's a 24 L.E.D unit powered by AAA-cells and was purchased on sale from Harbor Freight Tools. While not specifically manufactured as a light for cycles, it works at the task quite well. Of course a small bit of ingenuity was involved in securing it to the cycle. Now for those so interested, it is Harbor Freight Tools item #67227 Al in Philadelphia
             
        • phaedrus at yahoo
          A great technique for mounting flashlights to bikes is to use two hose clamps. Put one around the bar and the other through it at 90 degrees to go around the
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 17, 2012
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            A great technique for mounting flashlights to bikes is to use two hose clamps.  Put one around the bar and the other through it at 90 degrees to go around the light.  This doesn't provide lateral adjustability, but is very secure and is vertically adjustable.

            If you want to be able to easily take it on and off, they make thumb twister hose clamps like these: http://goo.gl/gbbMl

            With a straight barreled flashlight, it takes about three half-twists to get it on and off.

            - phaedrus


            On Tue, Oct 16, 2012 at 10:39 PM, jim <jimbofla1138@...> wrote:
             


            I've got a few of those Harbor Freight 67227, they help my old eyes on closeup work and I like that the magnet on the back keeps it handy on the bike repair stand or on the front door when I head out for some nighttime chore.  When the batts are new or charged up they are quite bright enough to catch a driver's attention, but don't throw the light as far as a light with a more curved and focused reflector and they do dim down considerable after a bit.  Also, for traffic I really like a front light that flashes, throws some decent side illumination and shows a bit of light back so that I can know it's still burning. 
             
            I've been impressed with how well even a smaller flashing bike light catches attention when I'm out driving. My ideal setup is two, one flashing and one steady, since  they cost so little, and my rechargeable batteries die of old age before they live through their lifespan of charge/dis cycles.  Just makles sense to have a backup around auto traffic.
             
             There are some pretty good, very cheap 6 and 9 LED flashers available on eBay, often shipped free from as far away as Hong Kong for under $5.  The Bell "Dawn Rider" that sells for about $9 at Mal-Wart has three quite bright LEDs, side illumination, a flashing function, and can be verified from the seat.. The weak link is the handlebar clamp, it won't take as many remove/replace cycles as it should, which I have found to be the major flaws in the cheapos.  Bell claims 65 steady/350 flashing hours for it, haven't worn the first set of cells out yet so I cannot say.
             
            I had two 6 volt, 10 watt Nighthawk halogen headlights with heavy SLA batteries before --  strong enough that oncoming drivers would flash me with their brights -- which pretty much defeated the utility of having real good lighting on the bow.
             
             

            From: Al <k3eax@...>
            To: "Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com" <Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 9:32 PM
            Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Off topic: An inexpensive light
             
             
            With the days becoming shorter and many of us who use our hub-gear equipped bikes into the night hours for transport, I thought that I'd share this approach to lighting.     I spent $3.27 to equip my everyday rider with a front-light. It's a 24 L.E.D unit powered by AAA-cells and was purchased on sale from Harbor Freight Tools. While not specifically manufactured as a light for cycles, it works at the task quite well. Of course a small bit of ingenuity was involved in securing it to the cycle.Now for those so interested, it is Harbor Freight Tools item #67227Al in Philadelphia
               


          • Cycle Monkey
            A friend of mine owns a company called Two Fish that produces a simple, easy to use mount called Lockblocks Flashlight Holder:
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 17, 2012
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              A friend of mine owns a company called Two Fish that produces a simple, easy to use mount called Lockblocks Flashlight Holder: http://www.twofish.biz/bike.html.  It's basically a rubber block with opposing velcro straps - one to hold the flashlight, the other to hold the handlebar.  Same idea as the hose clamps, but won't mar the parts.  Maybe not quite as much ultimate holding power, but seems to hold the light pretty well for normal use conditions.

              Neil


              On Wed, Oct 17, 2012 at 7:29 AM, phaedrus at yahoo <yahoo@...> wrote:
               

              A great technique for mounting flashlights to bikes is to use two hose clamps.  Put one around the bar and the other through it at 90 degrees to go around the light.  This doesn't provide lateral adjustability, but is very secure and is vertically adjustable.


              If you want to be able to easily take it on and off, they make thumb twister hose clamps like these: http://goo.gl/gbbMl

              With a straight barreled flashlight, it takes about three half-twists to get it on and off.

              - phaedrus


              On Tue, Oct 16, 2012 at 10:39 PM, jim <jimbofla1138@...> wrote:
               


              I've got a few of those Harbor Freight 67227, they help my old eyes on closeup work and I like that the magnet on the back keeps it handy on the bike repair stand or on the front door when I head out for some nighttime chore.  When the batts are new or charged up they are quite bright enough to catch a driver's attention, but don't throw the light as far as a light with a more curved and focused reflector and they do dim down considerable after a bit.  Also, for traffic I really like a front light that flashes, throws some decent side illumination and shows a bit of light back so that I can know it's still burning. 
               
              I've been impressed with how well even a smaller flashing bike light catches attention when I'm out driving. My ideal setup is two, one flashing and one steady, since  they cost so little, and my rechargeable batteries die of old age before they live through their lifespan of charge/dis cycles.  Just makles sense to have a backup around auto traffic.
               
               There are some pretty good, very cheap 6 and 9 LED flashers available on eBay, often shipped free from as far away as Hong Kong for under $5.  The Bell "Dawn Rider" that sells for about $9 at Mal-Wart has three quite bright LEDs, side illumination, a flashing function, and can be verified from the seat.. The weak link is the handlebar clamp, it won't take as many remove/replace cycles as it should, which I have found to be the major flaws in the cheapos.  Bell claims 65 steady/350 flashing hours for it, haven't worn the first set of cells out yet so I cannot say.
               
              I had two 6 volt, 10 watt Nighthawk halogen headlights with heavy SLA batteries before --  strong enough that oncoming drivers would flash me with their brights -- which pretty much defeated the utility of having real good lighting on the bow.
               
               

              From: Al <k3eax@...>
              To: "Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com" <Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 9:32 PM
              Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Off topic: An inexpensive light
               
               
              With the days becoming shorter and many of us who use our hub-gear equipped bikes into the night hours for transport, I thought that I'd share this approach to lighting.     I spent $3.27 to equip my everyday rider with a front-light. It's a 24 L.E.D unit powered by AAA-cells and was purchased on sale from Harbor Freight Tools. While not specifically manufactured as a light for cycles, it works at the task quite well. Of course a small bit of ingenuity was involved in securing it to the cycle.Now for those so interested, it is Harbor Freight Tools item #67227Al in Philadelphia
                 





              --
              Neil Flock
              Owner

              Cycle Monkey
              * Rohloff Service Partner
              * Custom Wheelbuilding
              * Distributor of Rohloff SPEEDHUBS, Schlumpf Gearing Systems
                Gates Carbon Drive Belt Systems, Wipperman Connex Chains
                Sapim Spokes and Nipples, No Tubes Tubeless Rims
                Magura Brakes, Race Face Cranks

              www.cyclemonkey.com
              cyclemonkeylab.blogspot.com
              Albany, CA 94706
              510-868-1777

            • jpbabic
              +1 on the Two Fish. I have several and highly recommend them. I also use this:
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 17, 2012
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                +1 on the Two Fish. I have several and highly recommend them.

                I also use this:

                http://dx.com/p/t6-waterproof-xml-t6-3-mode-1200-lumen-white-led-bike-light-with-battery-pack-set-82510

                Things to keep in mind with this:
                1. For various reasons, this website may not be for you. My biggest problem with them is shipping times, although I placed my most recent order while they were going through a bit of restructuring. That and a language barrier. One must adjust one's expectations when dealing with DX.
                2. The lumens rating are often over-rated by the vendors who sell through this website.
                3. This particular model is improved over others sold on DX.com but is not waterproof. Close enough for me though.
                4. There are other lights similar to this in design, and at a lower price. I ordered one and found it different in small ways that made it inferior to SKU 82510.

                I use this

                http://dx.com/p/ultrafire-wf-501b-xm-lt6-5-mode-510-lumen-memory-white-led-flashlight-with-strap-1-18650-55241

                with a Two Fish for backup and it pales in comparison to the headlight, so much so that it's light is lost when I turn on the headlamp.

                Undeniable values to be found at DX.com. Click around, read reviews and if ordering, get a side order of patience.

                --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Cycle Monkey <cyclemonkey@...> wrote:
                >
                > A friend of mine owns a company called Two Fish that produces a simple,
                > easy to use mount called Lockblocks Flashlight Holder:
                > http://www.twofish.biz/bike.html. It's basically a rubber block with
                > opposing velcro straps - one to hold the flashlight, the other to hold the
                > handlebar. Same idea as the hose clamps, but won't mar the parts. Maybe
                > not quite as much ultimate holding power, but seems to hold the light
                > pretty well for normal use conditions.
                >
                > Neil
              • anthonyeberger
                I ll just throw my experience with DX into the mix. Ordered the exact same light as below and was very excited when it came the day of a planned full moon
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 18, 2012
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                  I'll just throw my experience with DX into the mix.

                  Ordered the exact same light as below and was very excited when it came the day of a planned full moon ride. It worked GREAT, many of the other riders asked about it. Four rides later, tried to turn it on and got nothing. Battery charger said it was fully charged, light does nothing....button doesn't even light up.

                  Filled out RMA form on line. No response for TWO weeks and when I got it, I had to read it about four times to understand what they were trying to tell me. I responded with a question and waited another week before they got back to me. Finally got their RMA procedure to return the light and needless to say it was so complicated that it wasn't worth the effort, almost as though it was planned.

                  Hopefully you will have better luck with this light but I'm ordering my new ones from another vendor and am going with something slightly more "name brand".

                  Tony B.
                  Riverwest WI

                  --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "jpbabic" <jbabic@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > +1 on the Two Fish. I have several and highly recommend them.
                  >
                  > I also use this:
                  >
                  > http://dx.com/p/t6-waterproof-xml-t6-3-mode-1200-lumen-white-led-bike-light-with-battery-pack-set-82510
                  >
                  > Things to keep in mind with this:
                  > 1. For various reasons, this website may not be for you. My biggest problem with them is shipping times, although I placed my most recent order while they were going through a bit of restructuring. That and a language barrier. One must adjust one's expectations when dealing with DX.
                  > 2. The lumens rating are often over-rated by the vendors who sell through this website.
                  > 3. This particular model is improved over others sold on DX.com but is not waterproof. Close enough for me though.
                  > 4. There are other lights similar to this in design, and at a lower price. I ordered one and found it different in small ways that made it inferior to SKU 82510.
                  >
                  > I use this
                  >
                  > http://dx.com/p/ultrafire-wf-501b-xm-lt6-5-mode-510-lumen-memory-white-led-flashlight-with-strap-1-18650-55241
                  >
                  > with a Two Fish for backup and it pales in comparison to the headlight, so much so that it's light is lost when I turn on the headlamp.
                  >
                  > Undeniable values to be found at DX.com. Click around, read reviews and if ordering, get a side order of patience.
                  >
                  > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Cycle Monkey <cyclemonkey@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > A friend of mine owns a company called Two Fish that produces a simple,
                  > > easy to use mount called Lockblocks Flashlight Holder:
                  > > http://www.twofish.biz/bike.html. It's basically a rubber block with
                  > > opposing velcro straps - one to hold the flashlight, the other to hold the
                  > > handlebar. Same idea as the hose clamps, but won't mar the parts. Maybe
                  > > not quite as much ultimate holding power, but seems to hold the light
                  > > pretty well for normal use conditions.
                  > >
                  > > Neil
                  >
                • Steven Johnson
                  I modified an old Wonder Light bracket that works pretty well for my Surefire.   Steve ________________________________ From: phaedrus at yahoo
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 15, 2012
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                    I modified an old Wonder Light bracket that works pretty well for my Surefire.
                     
                    Steve

                    From: phaedrus at yahoo <yahoo@...>
                    To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 10:29 AM
                    Subject: Re: [Geared_hub_bikes] Off topic: An inexpensive light
                     
                    A great technique for mounting flashlights to bikes is to use two hose clamps.  Put one around the bar and the other through it at 90 degrees to go around the light.  This doesn't provide lateral adjustability, but is very secure and is vertically adjustable.

                    If you want to be able to easily take it on and off, they make thumb twister hose clamps like these: http://goo.gl/gbbMl

                    With a straight barreled flashlight, it takes about three half-twists to get it on and off.

                    - phaedrus
                    On Tue, Oct 16, 2012 at 10:39 PM, jim <jimbofla1138@...> wrote:
                     

                    I've got a few of those Harbor Freight 67227, they help my old eyes on closeup work and I like that the magnet on the back keeps it handy on the bike repair stand or on the front door when I head out for some nighttime chore.  When the batts are new or charged up they are quite bright enough to catch a driver's attention, but don't throw the light as far as a light with a more curved and focused reflector and they do dim down considerable after a bit.  Also, for traffic I really like a front light that flashes, throws some decent side illumination and shows a bit of light back so that I can know it's still burning. 
                     
                    I've been impressed with how well even a smaller flashing bike light catches attention when I'm out driving. My ideal setup is two, one flashing and one steady, since  they cost so little, and my rechargeable batteries die of old age before they live through their lifespan of charge/dis cycles.  Just makles sense to have a backup around auto traffic.
                     
                     There are some pretty good, very cheap 6 and 9 LED flashers available on eBay, often shipped free from as far away as Hong Kong for under $5.  The Bell "Dawn Rider" that sells for about $9 at Mal-Wart has three quite bright LEDs, side illumination, a flashing function, and can be verified from the seat.. The weak link is the handlebar clamp, it won't take as many remove/replace cycles as it should, which I have found to be the major flaws in the cheapos.  Bell claims 65 steady/350 flashing hours for it, haven't worn the first set of cells out yet so I cannot say.
                     
                    I had two 6 volt, 10 watt Nighthawk halogen headlights with heavy SLA batteries before --  strong enough that oncoming drivers would flash me with their brights -- which pretty much defeated the utility of having real good lighting on the bow.
                     
                     
                    From: Al <k3eax@...>
                    To: "Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com" <Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 9:32 PM
                    Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Off topic: An inexpensive light
                     
                     
                    With the days becoming shorter and many of us who use our hub-gear equipped bikes into the night hours for transport, I thought that I'd share this approach to lighting.     I spent $3.27 to equip my everyday rider with a front-light. It's a 24 L.E.D unit powered by AAA-cells and was purchased on sale from Harbor Freight Tools. While not specifically manufactured as a light for cycles, it works at the task quite well. Of course a small bit of ingenuity was involved in securing it to the cycle.Now for those so interested, it is Harbor Freight Tools item #67227Al in Philadelphia
                       
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