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Off topic: My worn-out rain cape

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  • k3eax
    My Log House brand rain cape of 22 years service has become too ineffective in shedding rain. It seems that water-proof coating that was applied to the inner
    Message 1 of 15 , Sep 4, 2012
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      My Log House brand rain cape of 22 years service has become too ineffective in shedding rain. It seems that water-proof coating that was applied to the inner surface of the cape's nylon fabric has stater to flake-off. This probably due to use and the occasionally subjected machine washing.

      Now what to do, replace or "repair"? I should like recommendations based on actual usagefor available replacements from U.S. vendors. Also suggestions for applying water-proofing to the current cape would be extremely welcomed!

      I'm motivated to action because of two recent drenchings, a commute to university on last week's Monday and yesterday's round trip made to participate in the Labor Day Parade.

      Al, yet damp, in Philadelphia
    • David Chase
      Wouldn t a thin coating of store-brand axle-grease get the job done? :-) Seriously, I would not mind know a good answer to this, either. I m not very good at
      Message 2 of 15 , Sep 4, 2012
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        Wouldn't a thin coating of store-brand axle-grease get the job done? :-)

        Seriously, I would not mind know a good answer to this, either.

        I'm not very good at taking care of raincoats with that weird coating (or rather, I find their care instructions to be implausibly picky).

        I've wondered about this one for a while: http://www.rivbike.com/product-p/ar1.htm

        David

        On 2012-09-04, at 9:11 AM, k3eax <k3eax@...> wrote:

        > My Log House brand rain cape of 22 years service has become too ineffective in shedding rain. It seems that water-proof coating that was applied to the inner surface of the cape's nylon fabric has stater to flake-off. This probably due to use and the occasionally subjected machine washing.
        >
        > Now what to do, replace or "repair"? I should like recommendations based on actual usagefor available replacements from U.S. vendors. Also suggestions for applying water-proofing to the current cape would be extremely welcomed!
        >
        > I'm motivated to action because of two recent drenchings, a commute to university on last week's Monday and yesterday's round trip made to participate in the Labor Day Parade.
        >
        > Al, yet damp, in Philadelphia
      • wahooncx@yahoo.com
        Buy another one from Campmor? I have one of those and it still serves me well. Aaron Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From: David Chase
        Message 3 of 15 , Sep 4, 2012
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          Buy another one from Campmor? I have one of those and it still serves me well.

          Aaron
          Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

          From: David Chase <dr2chase@...>
          Sender: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tue, 04 Sep 2012 09:35:21 -0400
          To: <Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com>
          ReplyTo: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Geared_hub_bikes] Off topic: My worn-out rain cape

           

          Wouldn't a thin coating of store-brand axle-grease get the job done? :-)

          Seriously, I would not mind know a good answer to this, either.

          I'm not very good at taking care of raincoats with that weird coating (or rather, I find their care instructions to be implausibly picky).

          I've wondered about this one for a while: http://www.rivbike.com/product-p/ar1.htm

          David

          On 2012-09-04, at 9:11 AM, k3eax <k3eax@...> wrote:

          > My Log House brand rain cape of 22 years service has become too ineffective in shedding rain. It seems that water-proof coating that was applied to the inner surface of the cape's nylon fabric has stater to flake-off. This probably due to use and the occasionally subjected machine washing.
          >
          > Now what to do, replace or "repair"? I should like recommendations based on actual usagefor available replacements from U.S. vendors. Also suggestions for applying water-proofing to the current cape would be extremely welcomed!
          >
          > I'm motivated to action because of two recent drenchings, a commute to university on last week's Monday and yesterday's round trip made to participate in the Labor Day Parade.
          >
          > Al, yet damp, in Philadelphia

        • grishnakuk
          Stuff just does`nt last anymore does it :-),Tent re-proofer?
          Message 4 of 15 , Sep 4, 2012
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            Stuff just does`nt last anymore does it :-),Tent re-proofer?

            --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "k3eax" <k3eax@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > My Log House brand rain cape of 22 years service has become too ineffective in shedding rain. It seems that water-proof coating that was applied to the inner surface of the cape's nylon fabric has stater to flake-off. This probably due to use and the occasionally subjected machine washing.
            >
            > Now what to do, replace or "repair"? I should like recommendations based on actual usagefor available replacements from U.S. vendors. Also suggestions for applying water-proofing to the current cape would be extremely welcomed!
            >
            > I'm motivated to action because of two recent drenchings, a commute to university on last week's Monday and yesterday's round trip made to participate in the Labor Day Parade.
            >
            > Al, yet damp, in Philadelphia
            >
          • Jud Jones
            If it¹s nylon, I would be inclined to try either Camp-Dri, a spray-on product that works better than Scotch-Gard, and is supposedly not as toxic, or else
            Message 5 of 15 , Sep 4, 2012
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              Re: [Geared_hub_bikes] Off topic:  My worn-out rain cape If it’s nylon, I would be inclined to try either Camp-Dri, a spray-on product that works better than Scotch-Gard, and is supposedly not as toxic, or else Nik-Wax (or Nik-Wash, a wash-in product) sold by Aerostich, a Duluth manufacturer of corura motorcycle suits. If it were canvas, my first try might be Sno-Seal (notice how many of these things have hyphenated names), which is mostly beeswax (bees-wax?), a major component of Proofide, and of the canvas dressings sold for Belstaff, Bohn and Barbour waxed canvas motorcycle gear.


              On 9/4/12 8:11 AM, "k3eax" <k3eax@...> wrote:


               
               
                 

               
               My Log House brand rain cape of 22 years service has become too ineffective in shedding rain. It seems that water-proof coating that was applied to the inner surface of the cape's nylon fabric has stater to flake-off. This probably due to use and the occasionally subjected machine washing.

              Now what to do, replace or "repair"? I should like recommendations based on actual usagefor available replacements from U.S. vendors. Also suggestions for applying water-proofing to the current cape would be extremely welcomed!

              I'm motivated to action because of two recent drenchings, a commute to university on last week's Monday and yesterday's round trip made to participate in the Labor Day Parade.

              Al, yet damp, in Philadelphia

               
                 



            • k3eax
              Thanks for the replies! David, the grease idea has merit but I ve been told that I m a slippery enough character as it is. And Jud your suggestion regarding
              Message 6 of 15 , Sep 4, 2012
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                Thanks for the replies! David, the grease idea has merit but I've been told that I'm a slippery enough character as it is. And Jud your suggestion regarding spray-ons has great appeal especially because I happen to have a can of Scotch Guard on the shelf which I oddly enough never occurred to me that I might use it on my cape.

                Later today I'll treat the cape. And since tomorrow's forecast calls for more rain, I'll report back with a teat report.

                Al, the superannuated college-boy
              • Rick Paulos
                I got to ride on of these unusual bicycles this weekend. It has a variable size chain ring paired with a single bmx style freewheel on the rear wheel and a
                Message 7 of 15 , Sep 4, 2012
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                  I got to ride on of these unusual bicycles this weekend.

                  It has a variable size chain ring paired with a single bmx style
                  freewheel on the rear wheel and a chain tensioner similar to a
                  standard rear derailleur to take up the chain slack when you shift.

                  The shifting is manual, not automatic as listed on some sites. To
                  shift, you stop pedaling, you squeeze a manual shift lever that
                  engages a pin on the crank set inner plate, holding it in place, you
                  pedal a small amount to shift. Pedal forward to up shift, pedal
                  backwards to down shift. 9 detents gives you 9 different effective
                  chain ring sizes. There is no indicator to show you what gear you are
                  in. It's a bit of guess work. You can shift multiple detents at the
                  same time, you can shift while stationary.

                  The other odd feature of the bike was the cable rim brake. The rear
                  rim is formed with an extra channel on one side. The brake cable
                  runs almost all of the way around the rim and is anchored to the
                  frame. When you squeeze the brake lever, the cable tightens up on
                  the rim. The cable comes with a kevlar tube over it to prevent it
                  from just cutting through the aluminum rim.

                  I took a few photos
                  http://www.flickr.com/groups/2041698@N25/pool/with/7930631756/#photo_7930631756

                  There are plenty more on the web.
                  http://ustimes.com/Bicycle/

                  rick
                  Iowa.
                • Colin Bryant
                  Hmm.    I think it would be the only competition for IGH in the shift-while-stopped category, which is good since it sounds like you could come to a stop,
                  Message 8 of 15 , Sep 4, 2012
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                    Hmm.    I think it would be the only competition for IGH in the shift-while-stopped category, which is good since it sounds like you could come to a stop, while trying to downshift for a hill.

                    One of the reasons I switched to disk brakes, several bikes back, was due to the chewed up rims, from winter grime on rim brakes.  I expect the Yankee would be the same, except rims would be unobtanium.  It sounds like the brake "band" certainly is.  Only a rear brake too: scary!
                     
                    --

                    Colin Bryant
                    Vancouver, Canada

                     


                    From: Rick Paulos <rick-paulos@...>
                    To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tuesday, September 4, 2012 9:48:15 AM
                    Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Yankee Bicycles

                     
                    I got to ride on of these unusual bicycles this weekend.

                    It has a variable size chain ring paired with a single bmx style
                    freewheel on the rear wheel and a chain tensioner similar to a
                    standard rear derailleur to take up the chain slack when you shift.

                    The shifting is manual, not automatic as listed on some sites. To
                    shift, you stop pedaling, you squeeze a manual shift lever that
                    engages a pin on the crank set inner plate, holding it in place, you
                    pedal a small amount to shift. Pedal forward to up shift, pedal
                    backwards to down shift. 9 detents gives you 9 different effective
                    chain ring sizes. There is no indicator to show you what gear you are
                    in. It's a bit of guess work. You can shift multiple detents at the
                    same time, you can shift while stationary.

                    The other odd feature of the bike was the cable rim brake. The rear
                    rim is formed with an extra channel on one side. The brake cable
                    runs almost all of the way around the rim and is anchored to the
                    frame. When you squeeze the brake lever, the cable tightens up on
                    the rim. The cable comes with a kevlar tube over it to prevent it
                    from just cutting through the aluminum rim.

                    I took a few photos
                    http://www.flickr.com/groups/2041698@N25/pool/with/7930631756/#photo_7930631756

                    There are plenty more on the web.
                    http://ustimes.com/Bicycle/

                    rick
                    Iowa.



                  • Arthur Stout
                    Wow!  That really is unusual.  Cool. ________________________________ From: Rick Paulos To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com Sent:
                    Message 9 of 15 , Sep 4, 2012
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                      Wow!  That really is unusual.  Cool.

                      From: Rick Paulos <rick-paulos@...>
                      To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, September 4, 2012 11:48 AM
                      Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Yankee Bicycles

                       
                      I got to ride on of these unusual bicycles this weekend.

                      It has a variable size chain ring paired with a single bmx style
                      freewheel on the rear wheel and a chain tensioner similar to a
                      standard rear derailleur to take up the chain slack when you shift.

                      The shifting is manual, not automatic as listed on some sites. To
                      shift, you stop pedaling, you squeeze a manual shift lever that
                      engages a pin on the crank set inner plate, holding it in place, you
                      pedal a small amount to shift. Pedal forward to up shift, pedal
                      backwards to down shift. 9 detents gives you 9 different effective
                      chain ring sizes. There is no indicator to show you what gear you are
                      in. It's a bit of guess work. You can shift multiple detents at the
                      same time, you can shift while stationary.

                      The other odd feature of the bike was the cable rim brake. The rear
                      rim is formed with an extra channel on one side. The brake cable
                      runs almost all of the way around the rim and is anchored to the
                      frame. When you squeeze the brake lever, the cable tightens up on
                      the rim. The cable comes with a kevlar tube over it to prevent it
                      from just cutting through the aluminum rim.

                      I took a few photos
                      http://www.flickr.com/groups/2041698@N25/pool/with/7930631756/#photo_7930631756

                      There are plenty more on the web.
                      http://ustimes.com/Bicycle/

                      rick
                      Iowa.



                    • pj
                      Variable gears via an expandable chainwheel: since 1894, an idea that refuses both to die and to catch on. pj
                      Message 10 of 15 , Sep 4, 2012
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                        Variable gears via an expandable chainwheel: since 1894, an idea that refuses both to die and to catch on.

                        pj
                      • David Dannenberg
                        At the risk of sounding profligate, I would say that after 22 years the cape doesn t owe you anything. Retire it and get a new one. If you liked it, get one
                        Message 11 of 15 , Sep 5, 2012
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                          At the risk of sounding profligate, I would say that after 22 years the cape doesn't owe you anything. Retire it and get a new one. If you liked it, get one just like it. Personally I prefer a Gore-tex or similar dedicated biking rain jacket and pants. They have nice zippers including vents in the arm pits, velcro sleeves, a flap that folds down to protect your butt and back if riding a bike sans fenders, and best of all they keep you pretty dry as they do a reasonably good job of keeping water out and letting vapor escape. Until I started wearing garments such as those I simply resolved to be wet from rain or sweat as nothing worked (well, umbrellas work well, but not on bikes) to keep me dry in wet weather. REI, a nice bike ride away from most anywhere in Philadelphia, sells great stuff and most of it carries a lifetime warranty; if it looses its coating in 22 years you might press for a free replacement.

                          David
                        • RobHalligan
                          I reviewed a bike poncho I bought on Amazon here . It s presently $13.64. Rob Halligan HalliganProjects.com
                          Message 12 of 15 , Sep 5, 2012
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                            I reviewed a bike poncho I bought on Amazon here. It's presently $13.64.

                            Rob Halligan
                            HalliganProjects.com

                          • terry fortune
                            I like capes/poncho`s,but you need spats to keep your lower leg dry.
                            Message 13 of 15 , Sep 5, 2012
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                              I like capes/poncho`s,but you need spats to keep your lower leg dry.
                                                                                                                                    Terry



                              From: RobHalligan <rob@...>
                              To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Wednesday, 5 September 2012, 15:29
                              Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Off topic: My worn-out rain cape

                               

                              I reviewed a bike poncho I bought on Amazon here. It's presently $13.64.


                            • Al
                              Bah humbug, David!  I m of a certain set of mind  that says be sure the item is beyond repair before replacing. I do use a  rain suit, specifically for
                              Message 14 of 15 , Sep 5, 2012
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                                Bah humbug, David!  I'm of a certain set of mind  that says be sure the item is beyond repair before replacing.

                                I do use a  rain suit, specifically for motorcycling, when riding my Royal Enfield 350 but do prefer a cape when cycling in rain

                                Thanks for taking the time to reply,

                                        Al

                                From: David Dannenberg <ddannenberg@...>
                                To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Wednesday, September 5, 2012 9:44 AM
                                Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Off topic: My worn-out rain cape

                                 
                                At the risk of sounding profligate, I would say that after 22 years the cape doesn't owe you anything. Retire it and get a new one. If you liked it, get one just like it. Personally I prefer a Gore-tex or similar dedicated biking rain jacket and pants. They have nice zippers including vents in the arm pits, velcro sleeves, a flap that folds down to protect your butt and back if riding a bike sans fenders, and best of all they keep you pretty dry as they do a reasonably good job of keeping water out and letting vapor escape. Until I started wearing garments such as those I simply resolved to be wet from rain or sweat as nothing worked (well, umbrellas work well, but not on bikes) to keep me dry in wet weather. REI, a nice bike ride away from most anywhere in Philadelphia, sells great stuff and most of it carries a lifetime warranty; if it looses its coating in 22 years you might press for a free replacement.

                                David



                              • Al
                                Bob, that poncho/cape seems like an excellent value for money and will certainly order one if the  Scotch Guard treatment of my current cape doesn t do the
                                Message 15 of 15 , Sep 5, 2012
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                                  Bob, that poncho/cape seems like an excellent value for money and will certainly order one if the  Scotch Guard treatment of my current cape doesn't do the job.

                                    Thanks, Al

                                  From: Rob Halligan <rob@...>
                                  To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Wednesday, September 5, 2012 10:29 AM
                                  Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Off topic: My worn-out rain cape

                                   

                                  I reviewed a bike poncho I bought on Amazon here. It's presently $13.64.


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