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Would Stripping Torpedo 3 Improve Coaster Brake?

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  • Rob Halligan
    The coaster brake on my 1985 Sachs Torpedo 3-Speed is pretty weak. If I put all my 180 pound weight on the right pedal it slows me to a stop in about 20 feet.
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 1, 2012
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      The coaster brake on my 1985 Sachs Torpedo 3-Speed is pretty weak. If I put all my 180 pound weight on the right pedal it slows me to a stop in about 20 feet. Back-pedaling the left pedal seems to stop it a little better. (I depend on a front rim brake.) It shifts great. I’d pull this hub apart to replace any parts, lube, and/or do any fixes if I knew there were fixes or improvements in the braking ability that could achieved while in there. Or is this (what I see as) weak braking normal? Any thoughts/recommendations on what could be done to improve the braking would be much appreciated.

       

      More details on this bike here.

      BTW - I’ve been interested to read people writing positive things about hub drum brakes on this list. I’d figured they were quant antiquities.

       

      Rob Halligan
      HalliganProjects.com

       

    • chkamb
      From my experience having disassembled and assembled as well as changed some Torpedos from coaster brake to free, this will not help, sorry. I had also the
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 2, 2012
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        From my experience having disassembled and assembled as well as changed some Torpedos from coaster brake to free, this will not help, sorry. I had also the problem on several of the hubs showing insufficient braking but never figured out the real or main reason and although cleaning, greasing them with the right grease, changing some parts and assembling them with tight tolerances they showed weak break performances as before..
        Cheers, Chris

        --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Rob Halligan <rob@...> wrote:
        >
        > The coaster brake on my 1985 Sachs Torpedo 3-Speed is pretty weak. If I put all my 180 pound weight on the right pedal it slows me to a stop in about 20 feet. Back-pedaling the left pedal seems to stop it a little better. (I depend on a front rim brake.) It shifts great. I'd pull this hub apart to replace any parts, lube, and/or do any fixes if I knew there were fixes or improvements in the braking ability that could achieved while in there. Or is this (what I see as) weak braking normal? Any thoughts/recommendations on what could be done to improve the braking would be much appreciated.
        >
        > More details on this bike here<http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php/691113-Re-building-Bertha-DC-rehab-project-detailed>.
        > BTW - I've been interested to read people writing positive things about hub drum brakes on this list. I'd figured they were quant antiquities.
        >
        > Rob Halligan
        > HalliganProjects.com<http://www.halliganprojects.com/>
        >
      • RobHalligan
        Thanks Chris. I guess those skids we made on coasterbrake bikes as kids were on single speed hubs...I see Aaron wrote a while back that coasterbrakes are
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 5, 2012
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          Thanks Chris.

          I guess those skids we made on coasterbrake bikes as kids were on single speed hubs...I see Aaron wrote a while back that coasterbrakes are really only expected to function on flat surfaces; I think that says coasterbrakes aren't great.

          Does anyone know if drum brakes are better?

          --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "chkamb" <chkamb@...> wrote:
          >
          > From my experience having disassembled and assembled as well as changed some Torpedos from coaster brake to free, this will not help, sorry. I had also the problem on several of the hubs showing insufficient braking but never figured out the real or main reason and although cleaning, greasing them with the right grease, changing some parts and assembling them with tight tolerances they showed weak break performances as before..
          > Cheers, Chris
          >
          > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Rob Halligan <rob@> wrote:
          > >
          > > The coaster brake on my 1985 Sachs Torpedo 3-Speed is pretty weak. If I put all my 180 pound weight on the right pedal it slows me to a stop in about 20 feet. Back-pedaling the left pedal seems to stop it a little better. (I depend on a front rim brake.) It shifts great. I'd pull this hub apart to replace any parts, lube, and/or do any fixes if I knew there were fixes or improvements in the braking ability that could achieved while in there. Or is this (what I see as) weak braking normal? Any thoughts/recommendations on what could be done to improve the braking would be much appreciated.
          > >
          > > More details on this bike here<http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php/691113-Re-building-Bertha-DC-rehab-project-detailed>.
          > > BTW - I've been interested to read people writing positive things about hub drum brakes on this list. I'd figured they were quant antiquities.
          > >
          > > Rob Halligan
          > > HalliganProjects.com<http://www.halliganprojects.com/>
          > >
          >
        • Aaron Whaley
          Drum brakes and Roller brakes (Shimano s version of drum brakes) work well. The Dutch Baksfiets (box bikes) come with roller brakes, and they can top 400#
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 5, 2012
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            Drum brakes and Roller brakes (Shimano's version of drum brakes) work well. The Dutch Baksfiets (box bikes) come with roller brakes, and they can top 400# loaded. I ride an XL city bike that with me a full load of groceries can top 300#, I have no problem stopping using Shimano roller brakes. To me the best feature is the all weather use. I wanted a Shimano dyno hub with roller brake to match the rear Nexus 7 speed roller brake (soon to be Nexus 8 red band). Not available in the US even though it was shown on the Shimano website. I ended up ordering mine direct from The Netherlands. 

            I have a bike that I am still in the process of building up using the modern Sturmey Archer drum brakes and I expect decent performance from those too. 

            Aaron


            From: RobHalligan <rob@...>
            To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2012 7:43 PM
            Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: Would Stripping Torpedo 3 Improve Coaster Brake?

             
            Thanks Chris.

            I guess those skids we made on coasterbrake bikes as kids were on single speed hubs...I see Aaron wrote a while back that coasterbrakes are really only expected to function on flat surfaces; I think that says coasterbrakes aren't great.

            Does anyone know if drum brakes are better?

            --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "chkamb" <chkamb@...> wrote:
            >
            > From my experience having disassembled and assembled as well as changed some Torpedos from coaster brake to free, this will not help, sorry. I had also the problem on several of the hubs showing insufficient braking but never figured out the real or main reason and although cleaning, greasing them with the right grease, changing some parts and assembling them with tight tolerances they showed weak break performances as before..
            > Cheers, Chris
            >
            > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Rob Halligan <rob@> wrote:
            > >
            > > The coaster brake on my 1985 Sachs Torpedo 3-Speed is pretty weak. If I put all my 180 pound weight on the right pedal it slows me to a stop in about 20 feet. Back-pedaling the left pedal seems to stop it a little better. (I depend on a front rim brake.) It shifts great. I'd pull this hub apart to replace any parts, lube, and/or do any fixes if I knew there were fixes or improvements in the braking ability that could achieved while in there. Or is this (what I see as) weak braking normal? Any thoughts/recommendations on what could be done to improve the braking would be much appreciated.
            > >
            > > More details on this bike here<http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php/691113-Re-building-Bertha-DC-rehab-project-detailed>.
            > > BTW - I've been interested to read people writing positive things about hub drum brakes on this list. I'd figured they were quant antiquities.
            > >
            > > Rob Halligan
            > > HalliganProjects.com<http://www.halliganprojects.com/>
            > >
            >



          • joe ninety
            Hi, some of the enthusiasm for drum brakes would have come from me. It s worth distinguishing between coaster brakes, roller brakes and drum brakes. While they
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 6, 2012
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              Hi,
              some of the enthusiasm for drum brakes would have come from me. It's worth distinguishing between coaster brakes, roller brakes and drum brakes. While they share the basic idea of shoes pushing outward against the hub, a coaster brake is steel on steel, grease lubricated, with a drum diameter of about 60mm, Roller brakes have a larger drum, but still metal on metal with grease lubrication. Drum brakes have large drums (140mm or 180mm diameter for the sturmey versions), and proper fibrous brake pads. The performance, and the noise level, are much improved. It's also worth noting that the roller brake is the only one of the three that can be fitted or removed, and that roller brakes require long pull levers whereas drums require standard pull.

              Regards Simon
            • Sven-Olof Johansson
              Just a few points: coaster brakes can also be brass/bronze on steel, like for example Sachs Torpedo/Duomatic/Automatic. Still not a great brake, but good
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 6, 2012
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                Just a few points: coaster brakes can also be brass/bronze on steel, like for example Sachs Torpedo/Duomatic/Automatic. Still not a great brake, but good enough if you're not riding in San Francisco :)

                I know that the SA XL-series drum brakes are 90mm – I use an XL-FDD front hub on my cargo bike – but are there even bigger ones? 180mm is the same size as the rear brakes on my car ...

                /s-o


                6 aug 2012 kl. 09:44 skrev joe ninety <joe.ninety90@...>:

                Hi,
                some of the enthusiasm for drum brakes would have come from me. It's worth distinguishing between coaster brakes, roller brakes and drum brakes. While they share the basic idea of shoes pushing outward against the hub, a coaster brake is steel on steel, grease lubricated, with a drum diameter of about 60mm, Roller brakes have a larger drum, but still metal on metal with grease lubrication. Drum brakes have large drums (140mm or 180mm diameter for the sturmey versions), and proper fibrous brake pads. The performance, and the noise level, are much improved. It's also worth noting that the roller brake is the only one of the three that can be fitted or removed, and that roller brakes require long pull levers whereas drums require standard pull.

                Regards Simon
              • Michael Reid
                I ve built a couple of Alfine s with 3x with no issues or concerns. I did build my Nuvinci 2x as recommended by the hub manufacturer. Those flanges are HUGE,
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 7, 2012
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                  I've built a couple of Alfine's with 3x with no issues or concerns.
                  I did build my Nuvinci 2x as recommended by the hub manufacturer.  Those flanges are HUGE, I tell you.
                • RobHalligan
                  I started this stream wondering if my Torpedo coaster brake hub had a problem and if drum brakes were quant antiquities. In the end, it seems that my Torpedo
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 15, 2012
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                    I started this stream wondering if my Torpedo coaster brake hub had a problem and if drum brakes were quant antiquities. In the end, it seems that my Torpedo brake is the quant antiquity. Bummer. Thanks all.

                    Rob Halligan
                    HalliganProjects.com

                    --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Rob Halligan <rob@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > The coaster brake on my 1985 Sachs Torpedo 3-Speed is pretty weak. If I put all my 180 pound weight on the right pedal it slows me to a stop in about 20 feet. Back-pedaling the left pedal seems to stop it a little better. (I depend on a front rim brake.) It shifts great. I'd pull this hub apart to replace any parts, lube, and/or do any fixes if I knew there were fixes or improvements in the braking ability that could achieved while in there. Or is this (what I see as) weak braking normal? Any thoughts/recommendations on what could be done to improve the braking would be much appreciated.
                    >
                    > More details on this bike here<http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php/691113-Re-building-Bertha-DC-rehab-project-detailed>.
                    > BTW - I've been interested to read people writing positive things about hub drum brakes on this list. I'd figured they were quant antiquities.
                    >
                    > Rob Halligan
                    > HalliganProjects.com<http://www.halliganprojects.com/>
                    >

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