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My daily rider

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  • Al
    Here s a photo of my current everyday rider. The bike was assembled from various discards,  probably about six different bikes.  Even the rear wheel, built
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 15, 2012
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    Here's a photo of my current everyday rider. The bike was assembled from various discards,  probably about six different bikes.  Even the rear wheel, built around a Sturmey AW, was laced up by me from a salvaged rim and spokes. I have zero dollars invested in the  bike.

    Not readily visible  are my Pennsylvania auto operator's  license number and frame serial number that have been both written with an indelible marker and engraved on the fenders, cranks, stem, frame etc. This number can be used by the police to readily identified the owner.

      Al in Philadelphia
  • dannyrobinson1962
    Well I d never have known by looking that it was built from things other people had thrown away. Building a good working bike from discarded parts is a skill
    Message 2 of 10 , Jul 15, 2012
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      Well I'd never have known by looking that it was built from things other people had thrown away. Building a good working bike from discarded parts is a skill I am going to try and develop -- I've recently been placing adverts in local convenience stores asking for scrap bikes. If I get any real junk, I can just take it apart to see how it all fits but without any worries about not being able to get it back together properly. And I will probably get stuff I can re-use, too.

      I use my driving licence number to identify things too! Postcode is not a good method, as it reveals my address to anyone who wants to know, and it changes whenever I move house. The driver number always moves with me, and in the event of a serious crash, the police (but only the police) can easily identify me.


      --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@...> wrote:
      >
      > Here's a photo of my current everyday rider. The bike was assembled from various discards,  probably about six different bikes.  Even the rear wheel, built around a Sturmey AW, was laced up by me from a salvaged rim and spokes. I have zero dollars invested in the  bike.
      >
      > Not readily visible  are my Pennsylvania auto operator's  license number and frame serial number that have been both written with an indelible marker and engraved on the fenders, cranks, stem, frame etc. This number can be used by the police to readily identified the owner.
      >
      >   Al in Philadelphia
      >
    • jim
      Make friends with the local scrap metal scroungers.  People throw away perfectly good bicycles just becasue they re bored with them or bothered at the hassle
      Message 3 of 10 , Jul 16, 2012
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        Make friends with the local scrap metal scroungers.  People throw away perfectly good bicycles just becasue they're bored with them or bothered at the hassle of taking it to the local charity store or selling it on Craigslist.  (is it still available?  Want to make $5,000 a day working from home?  is it still for sale? I'm a Nigerian prince, can you cash this check? Have you sold it yet?  Would you trade it for a budgie with feather mange?  Still got it??)
         
        My scrap buddy has brought me some pretty nice finds. 
         

        From: dannyrobinson1962 <dannyrobinson1962@...>
        To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, July 16, 2012 1:55 AM
        Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: My daily rider

         
        Well I'd never have known by looking that it was built from things other people had thrown away. Building a good working bike from discarded parts is a skill I am going to try and develop -- I've recently been placing adverts in local convenience stores asking for scrap bikes. If I get any real junk, I can just take it apart to see how it all fits but without any worries about not being able to get it back together properly. And I will probably get stuff I can re-use, too.

        I use my driving licence number to identify things too! Postcode is not a good method, as it reveals my address to anyone who wants to know, and it changes whenever I move house. The driver number always moves with me, and in the event of a serious crash, the police (but only the police) can easily identify me.

        --- In mailto:Geared_hub_bikes%40yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@...> wrote:
        >
        > Here's a photo of my current everyday rider. The bike was assembled from various discards,  probably about six different bikes.  Even the rear wheel, built around a Sturmey AW, was laced up by me from a salvaged rim and spokes. I have zero dollars invested in the  bike.
        >
        > Not readily visible  are my Pennsylvania auto operator's  license number and frame serial number that have been both written with an indelible marker and engraved on the fenders, cranks, stem, frame etc. This number can be used by the police to readily identified the owner.
        >
        >   Al in Philadelphia
        >



      • hubmanholland
        Yeah, I nearly cried the last time I went to our local dump. The metal recycling container contained several (what I consider to be) half decent bikes, and I
        Message 4 of 10 , Jul 17, 2012
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          Yeah, I nearly cried the last time I went to our local dump. The metal recycling container contained several (what I consider to be) half decent bikes, and I saw three or four IGHs in there too. I was so tempted to jump in there and fish them out, but circumstances didn't allow at the time.

          --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, jim <jimbofla1138@...> wrote:
          >
          > Make friends with the local scrap metal scroungers.  People throw away perfectly good bicycles just becasue they're bored with them or bothered at the hassle of taking it to the local charity store or selling it on Craigslist.  (is it still available?  Want to make $5,000 a day working from home?  is it still for sale? I'm a Nigerian prince, can you cash this check? Have you sold it yet?  Would you trade it for a budgie with feather mange?  Still got it??)
          >  
          > My scrap buddy has brought me some pretty nice finds. 
        • k3eax
          The Netherlands I should imagine to be a cornucopia for discarded cycles! Al
          Message 5 of 10 , Jul 17, 2012
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            The Netherlands I should imagine to be a cornucopia for discarded cycles!

            Al
          • michaelreid
            Nice looking bike you have there, Al. I like it! Do you have a spoke threader, or have them cut and threaded at a shop? Here is my only bike at the moment -
            Message 6 of 10 , Jul 18, 2012
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              Nice looking bike you have there, Al.  I like it!  Do you have a spoke threader, or have them cut and threaded at a shop?

              Here is my only bike at the moment - it does duty as a commuter, grocery getter, and can be easily converted to offroad duty.  As you can see from the pics, I have changed the saddle - the Brooks did not work for me on steep trails.



              --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@...> wrote:
              >
              > Here's a photo of my current everyday rider. The bike was assembled from various discards,  probably about six different bikes.  Even the rear wheel, built around a Sturmey AW, was laced up by me from a salvaged rim and spokes. I have zero dollars invested in the  bike.
              >
              > Not readily visible  are my Pennsylvania auto operator's  license number and frame serial number that have been both written with an indelible marker and engraved on the fenders, cranks, stem, frame etc. This number can be used by the police to readily identified the owner.
              >
              >   Al in Philadelphia
              >
            • Al
              Sehr gut, Michael! I have an Hozan spoke threader. While it s tedious to re-thread 36 spokes, its use helps me to feel very self righteous as a contributor
              Message 7 of 10 , Jul 18, 2012
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                Sehr gut, Michael!

                I have an Hozan spoke threader. While it's tedious to re-thread 36 spokes, its use helps me to feel very self righteous as a contributor toward resource "sustainability"!

                The photos show a ceratina evolution in the way your bikes has been fitted-out. Were the fenders removed permanently?  The Brooks seems to be a B17  -- they're beautiful but I also remove any Brooks from my bikes as they're often used in the rain. 

                 As they say in the first-grade, "Thanks for sharing".

                    Al 


                 

                 


                --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@...> wrote:
                >
                > Here's a photo of my current everyday rider. The bike was assembled from various discards,  probably about six different bikes.  Even the rear wheel, built around a Sturmey AW, was laced up by me from a salvaged rim and spokes. I have zero dollars invested in the  bike.
                >
                > Not readily visible  are my Pennsylvania auto operator's  license number and frame serial number that have been both written with an indelible marker and engraved on the fenders, cranks, stem, frame etc. This number can be used by the police to readily identified the owner.
                >
                >   Al in Philadelphia
                >


              • Colin Bryant
                You may even have a lower cog/chainring ratio than me!   -- Colin Bryant  Vancouver, Canada ________________________________ From: michaelreid
                Message 8 of 10 , Jul 18, 2012
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                  You may even have a lower cog/chainring ratio than me!
                   
                  --

                  Colin Bryant 
                  Vancouver, Canada


                  From: michaelreid <canyoneagle@...>
                  To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2012 1:34:59 PM
                  Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: My daily rider

                   
                  Nice looking bike you have there, Al.  I like it!  Do you have a spoke threader, or have them cut and threaded at a shop?

                  Here is my only bike at the moment - it does duty as a commuter, grocery getter, and can be easily converted to offroad duty.  As you can see from the pics, I have changed the saddle - the Brooks did not work for me on steep trails.



                  --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Here's a photo of my current everyday rider. The bike was assembled from various discards,  probably about six different bikes.  Even the rear wheel, built around a Sturmey AW, was laced up by me from a salvaged rim and spokes. I have zero dollars invested in the  bike.
                  >
                  > Not readily visible  are my Pennsylvania auto operator's  license number and frame serial number that have been both written with an indelible marker and engraved on the fenders, cranks, stem, frame etc. This number can be used by the police to readily identified the owner.
                  >
                  >   Al in Philadelphia
                  >


                • michaelreid
                  I was looking into one of those Hozan threaders myself, as other options are so bloody expensive. Granted the Phil Wood and other production-grade tools are
                  Message 9 of 10 , Jul 18, 2012
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                    I was looking into one of those Hozan threaders myself, as other options are so bloody expensive. Granted the Phil Wood and other production-grade tools are nice, but way too rich for my blood.

                    I can convert the bike back and forth between "road going" and "dirt going" modes within 30 minutes - tires, fenders, and rack.
                    Today I just put the tires and rack on, and am keeping the fenders off until the desert monsoons start to make their annual presence known here on Colorado's western slope.

                    When I built this bike, I wanted to have "one bike to do it all", and this one seems to fit the bill pretty well for my needs. I've been enjoying it.

                    --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Sehr gut, Michael!
                    >
                    > I have an Hozan spoke threader. While it's tedious to re-thread 36 spokes, its use helps me to feel very self righteous as a contributor toward resource "sustainability"!
                    >
                    > The photos show a ceratina evolution in the way your bikes has been fitted-out. Were the fenders removed permanently?  The Brooks seems to be a B17  -- they're beautiful but I also remove any Brooks from my bikes as they're often used in the rain. 
                    >
                    >  As they say in the first-grade, "Thanks for sharing".
                    >
                    >     Al 
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Here's a photo of my current everyday rider. The bike was assembled from various discards,  probably about six different bikes.  Even the rear wheel, built around a Sturmey AW, was laced up by me from a salvaged rim and spokes. I have zero dollars invested in the  bike.
                    > >
                    > > Not readily visible  are my Pennsylvania auto operator's  license number and frame serial number that have been both written with an indelible marker and engraved on the fenders, cranks, stem, frame etc. This number can be used by the police to readily identified the owner.
                    > >
                    > >   Al in Philadelphia
                    > >
                    >
                  • michaelreid
                    hehe - 32 - 17. This gives me a range of 27 to 98 gear inches with a 50mm tire.
                    Message 10 of 10 , Jul 18, 2012
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                      hehe - 32 - 17. This gives me a range of 27 to 98 gear inches with a 50mm tire.

                      --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Colin Bryant <sk8ski2004@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > You may even have a lower cog/chainring ratio than me!
                      >
                      >  
                      > --
                      >
                      > Colin Bryant 
                      > Vancouver, Canada
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: michaelreid <canyoneagle@...>
                      > To: Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2012 1:34:59 PM
                      > Subject: [Geared_hub_bikes] Re: My daily rider
                      >
                      >
                      >  
                      > Nice looking bike you have there, Al.  I like it!  Do you have a spoke threader, or have them cut and threaded at a shop?
                      >
                      > Here is my only bike at the moment - it does duty as a commuter, grocery getter, and can be easily converted to offroad duty.  As you can see from the pics, I have changed the saddle - the Brooks did not work for me on steep trails.
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Here's a photo of my current everyday rider. The bike was assembled from various discards,  probably about six different bikes.  Even the rear wheel, built around a Sturmey AW, was laced up by me from a salvaged rim and spokes. I have zero dollars invested in the  bike.
                      > >
                      > > Not readily visible  are my Pennsylvania auto operator's  license number and frame serial number that have been both written with an indelible marker and engraved on the fenders, cranks, stem, frame etc. This number can be used by the police to readily identified the owner.
                      > >
                      > >   Al in Philadelphia
                      > >
                      >
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