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Re: About me

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  • wahooncx
    Hi Danny, Welcome to the forums. I have been rolling Raleigh 3 speeds for many, many years for a reason, they are built for daily use with minimal maintenance.
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 4, 2012
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      Hi Danny,

      Welcome to the forums.
      I have been rolling Raleigh 3 speeds for many, many years for a reason, they are built for daily use with minimal maintenance. I love my three speeds for their simplicity and durability. I have one nondescript basic Raleigh that I have owned for over 30 years, it has well over 35,000 miles on it and it is semi retired, but could certainly still be used for daily use if necessary.

      I still have a couple of derailleur bikes,but those are for specific use, like loaded touring or fire trail riding.

      Aaron
    • D B
      Welcome Danny. I m rocking mostly Birmingham Hercules and other English 3-speeds, with some 5, 8 & 9 speeds thrown into the mix. I ve learned a lot here and am
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 4, 2012
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        Welcome Danny. I'm rocking mostly Birmingham Hercules and other English 3-speeds, with some 5, 8 & 9 speeds thrown into the mix. I've learned a lot here and am sure you will also.

        Dallas Blair 

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Mar 4, 2012, at 1:40 PM, "dannyrobinson1962" <dannyrobinson1962@...> wrote:

         

        Hi everyone,

        Let me tell you a little about me… I live in Maidstone, Kent, UK, and I cycle into work and back every day. It's about 2 miles each way and cycling is often quicker than taking the car into the office! Downhill all the way there, and the route is mainly away from the main roads, then it's uphill all the way back… nothing a 3 speed can't cope with though.

        I have come to look on bikes as practical transport, not as sporting items. In the last year or so I've gone off mass market derailleur geared tourers (aka hybrids) – they are very common in the UK but when used every day they become too fiddly and temperamental for my liking.

        I asked around and became convinced that hub gears and drum brakes were the way to go. So I bought two secondhand Dutch bikes back in June last year (details are on your database already).

        The Nexus 8 Speed Puch Brilliant is for touring and commuting except in winter. The Batavus Barcelona 3 Speed is my winter and foul weather bike. Both of them were imported from Holland by their previous owners. I like the solidity and the upright riding position.

        Pictures of my bikes:
        https://picasaweb.google.com/110055669501444994025/DannySBikes#

        and a set of rear wheel removal pictures I posted, linked to from Bike Radar
        https://picasaweb.google.com/110055669501444994025/RearWheelRemovalWithAModernDutchBike My Bike Radar post on puncture repair on a full plastic chaincase Dutch bike is near top of the Google Results and I hope many people have found it useful.

        And among my other albums on Picasa you'll see some of me and my wife, holidays, outings, other bikey stuff etc etc. You're welcome to look!

        I've learned a lot about bikes in the past year, just by looking around on the forums and asking questions. That's partly why I'm in this group, to read and watch and learn. One day I'm going to build up a bike mainly from pre-used parts, just to see how I get on. I'll start with scrap, then eventually I fancy taking a single speed and converting it to a hub gear bike with drum brakes front and rear.

        Danny

        =
      • hubmanholland
        Hi Danny, Welcome to the group and for telling us all a bit about your situation. I m a Brit living in Holland and have a shed full of Dutch bikes and bits. I
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 5, 2012
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          Hi Danny,

          Welcome to the group and for telling us all a bit about your situation. I'm a Brit living in Holland and have a shed full of Dutch bikes and bits. I also like recovering abandoned wrecks from the side of the road and rebuilding them into workable bikes to give away to friends. I also run a weekly bike workshop in a deprived area of our city for people on low incomes. You're not likely to find me using a Rohloff in the next 10 years - way beyond my pocket. I've stripped and rebuilt most hubs commonly used here in Holland (SA AW, Sachs/SRAM T3, Nexus 3 & 7). I reckon that about 30% of Dutch bikes are single speed back pedal hubs, 50% hub gears and 20% derailler.

          Indeed the riding position of Dutch bikes is most practical and easy on the back. My mother calls them 'sit up and beg' bikes. Here in Holland bikes are seen as a serious form of transport, whereas my experience of cycling in the UK is that bikes are still regarded as toys or for recreation purposes. A second hand wreck here costs more than brand new bike in a UK chain store. My colleagues buy new Batavus or Gazelle city bikes for 900+ euros. The last new bike I bought in the UK cost me just 140 quid. Still, I'd always rather a second hand Dutch bike to a new UK city bike.

          Anyhow, enough rambling. If I can help in any way then you know where to find me.

          Best regards,

          Simon

          --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "dannyrobinson1962" <dannyrobinson1962@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi everyone,
          >
          > Let me tell you a little about me… I live in Maidstone, Kent, UK, and I cycle into work and back every day. It's about 2 miles each way and cycling is often quicker than taking the car into the office! Downhill all the way there, and the route is mainly away from the main roads, then it's uphill all the way back… nothing a 3 speed can't cope with though.
          >
          > I have come to look on bikes as practical transport, not as sporting items. In the last year or so I've gone off mass market derailleur geared tourers (aka hybrids) – they are very common in the UK but when used every day they become too fiddly and temperamental for my liking.
          >
          > I asked around and became convinced that hub gears and drum brakes were the way to go. So I bought two secondhand Dutch bikes back in June last year (details are on your database already).
          >
          > The Nexus 8 Speed Puch Brilliant is for touring and commuting except in winter. The Batavus Barcelona 3 Speed is my winter and foul weather bike. Both of them were imported from Holland by their previous owners. I like the solidity and the upright riding position.
          >
          > Pictures of my bikes:
          > https://picasaweb.google.com/110055669501444994025/DannySBikes#
          >
          > and a set of rear wheel removal pictures I posted, linked to from Bike Radar
          > https://picasaweb.google.com/110055669501444994025/RearWheelRemovalWithAModernDutchBike My Bike Radar post on puncture repair on a full plastic chaincase Dutch bike is near top of the Google Results and I hope many people have found it useful.
          >
          > And among my other albums on Picasa you'll see some of me and my wife, holidays, outings, other bikey stuff etc etc. You're welcome to look!
          >
          > I've learned a lot about bikes in the past year, just by looking around on the forums and asking questions. That's partly why I'm in this group, to read and watch and learn. One day I'm going to build up a bike mainly from pre-used parts, just to see how I get on. I'll start with scrap, then eventually I fancy taking a single speed and converting it to a hub gear bike with drum brakes front and rear.
          >
          > Danny
          >
        • Bruce Gilmore
          I m over in Fredrikshavn this week in Denmark at the shipyard, been having a good look at the bikes, some very old and battered looking utility bikes that just
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 6, 2012
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            I'm over in Fredrikshavn this week in Denmark at the shipyard, been having a good look at the bikes, some very old and battered looking utility bikes that just won't die, probably been used for a few generations of workers. At the large bike shed i had a rough count and the bikes were 10% deraileurs, 40% single sp coaster, 30% 3sp, 20% 5sp or 7sp.

            One curious thing i spotted was a shimano roller brake on the front of a bike with the brake arm on the RHS, i'm sure i've seen it usually on the left, but maybe there are 2 versions or maybe it can be mounted either way

            --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "hubmanholland" <hubstripping@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Danny,
            >
            > Welcome to the group and for telling us all a bit about your situation. I'm a Brit living in Holland and have a shed full of Dutch bikes and bits. I also like recovering abandoned wrecks from the side of the road and rebuilding them into workable bikes to give away to friends. I also run a weekly bike workshop in a deprived area of our city for people on low incomes. You're not likely to find me using a Rohloff in the next 10 years - way beyond my pocket. I've stripped and rebuilt most hubs commonly used here in Holland (SA AW, Sachs/SRAM T3, Nexus 3 & 7). I reckon that about 30% of Dutch bikes are single speed back pedal hubs, 50% hub gears and 20% derailler.
            >
            > Indeed the riding position of Dutch bikes is most practical and easy on the back. My mother calls them 'sit up and beg' bikes. Here in Holland bikes are seen as a serious form of transport, whereas my experience of cycling in the UK is that bikes are still regarded as toys or for recreation purposes. A second hand wreck here costs more than brand new bike in a UK chain store. My colleagues buy new Batavus or Gazelle city bikes for 900+ euros. The last new bike I bought in the UK cost me just 140 quid. Still, I'd always rather a second hand Dutch bike to a new UK city bike.
            >
            > Anyhow, enough rambling. If I can help in any way then you know where to find me.
            >
            > Best regards,
            >
            > Simon
            >
            > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "dannyrobinson1962" <dannyrobinson1962@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi everyone,
            > >
            > > Let me tell you a little about me… I live in Maidstone, Kent, UK, and I cycle into work and back every day. It's about 2 miles each way and cycling is often quicker than taking the car into the office! Downhill all the way there, and the route is mainly away from the main roads, then it's uphill all the way back… nothing a 3 speed can't cope with though.
            > >
            > > I have come to look on bikes as practical transport, not as sporting items. In the last year or so I've gone off mass market derailleur geared tourers (aka hybrids) – they are very common in the UK but when used every day they become too fiddly and temperamental for my liking.
            > >
            > > I asked around and became convinced that hub gears and drum brakes were the way to go. So I bought two secondhand Dutch bikes back in June last year (details are on your database already).
            > >
            > > The Nexus 8 Speed Puch Brilliant is for touring and commuting except in winter. The Batavus Barcelona 3 Speed is my winter and foul weather bike. Both of them were imported from Holland by their previous owners. I like the solidity and the upright riding position.
            > >
            > > Pictures of my bikes:
            > > https://picasaweb.google.com/110055669501444994025/DannySBikes#
            > >
            > > and a set of rear wheel removal pictures I posted, linked to from Bike Radar
            > > https://picasaweb.google.com/110055669501444994025/RearWheelRemovalWithAModernDutchBike My Bike Radar post on puncture repair on a full plastic chaincase Dutch bike is near top of the Google Results and I hope many people have found it useful.
            > >
            > > And among my other albums on Picasa you'll see some of me and my wife, holidays, outings, other bikey stuff etc etc. You're welcome to look!
            > >
            > > I've learned a lot about bikes in the past year, just by looking around on the forums and asking questions. That's partly why I'm in this group, to read and watch and learn. One day I'm going to build up a bike mainly from pre-used parts, just to see how I get on. I'll start with scrap, then eventually I fancy taking a single speed and converting it to a hub gear bike with drum brakes front and rear.
            > >
            > > Danny
            > >
            >
          • dannyrobinson1962
            Local topography definitely changes the sorts of bikes you see, as well as fashions having an influence. Central London is mainly flat and I see quite a few
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 7, 2012
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              Local topography definitely changes the sorts of bikes you see, as well as fashions having an influence.

              Central London is mainly flat and I see quite a few hub gear bikes round there, old, new, domestic and imported. Also single speeds are very common. I think that single speeds are going to be a passing fad and I suspect many will become converted to hub geared bikes in the future.

              The very successful London Cycle Hire bikes are all low geared Nexus 3 speeds and I think these are doing much to remind people that a 3 speed is often enough.

              Closer to home in Kent, I've hardly ever seen a hub gear bike in hilly Chatham, Gillingham and Rochester. Derailleurs are the thing round there. I live in Maidstone which is still hilly but most hills are not all that steep. There are a few other "hubbies" around here but I've never managed to strike up a conversation. In flat coastal Sheerness I see quite a few old 3 speeds. I wish I'd taken a photo of one in particular, a very unusual looking old Puch with the rustiest frame I ever saw, and a non indexed frame mounted lever shifter, racer style. The owner assured me it was still going strong.

              I wonder how many of today's cheap MTBs and hybrids will still be knocking around in 20 years... Some of those cheap supermarket bikes look shiny but are awful underneath.

              For boys' bikes, single speed BMX bikes are now very popular and often the saddle is lowered way down and the boys ride without sitting on it. I can't imagine you'd want to go very far like that.
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