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Re: Brake Updates

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  • Rich
    A lot of even current brakes can be improved by a change of brake pads. The Kool Stop Salmon pads are supposed to be excellent and reasonably priced. I have
    Message 1 of 13 , May 3, 2010
      A lot of even current brakes can be improved by a change of brake pads. The Kool Stop Salmon pads are supposed to be excellent and reasonably priced. I have also read good things about Swiss Stop pads and the new Shimano pad material as used on the BR-6700 Ultegra brakes and the BR-7900 Dura Ace brakes is supposed to be outstanding for both wet and dry use per users posts on BF.

      With todays traffic conditions in urban, and many suburban, areas I want good and easily modulated brakes.

      Rich Wood

      --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "chkamb" <chkamb@...> wrote:
      >
      > Dear Rich
      >
      > I have a Tektro R556 rear brake on my East German Diamant road bike. The reach of the brake is 55-73mm as the frame needs a rear reach of 62mm. Looks OK, brakes sufficiently (?). I sold the front brake to my neighbour who was building a low cost foixed gear bike with just a front brake. his experience is: wet and rainy weather: braking is challenging with the R556 ;-)
      > Chris
      >
    • Mike Wilson
      chkamb chkamb@gmx.de writes: I have a Tektro R556 rear brake on my East German Diamant road bike. The reach of the brake is 55-73mm as the frame needs a rear
      Message 2 of 13 , May 4, 2010
        chkamb" chkamb@... writes:

        I have a Tektro R556 rear brake on my East German Diamant road bike. The reach of the brake is 55-73mm as the frame needs a rear reach of 62mm. Looks OK, brakes sufficiently (?). I sold the front brake to my neighbour who was building a low cost foixed gear bike with just a front brake. his experience is: wet and rainy weather: braking is challenging with the R556 ;-)
        Chris
        ----------------
        I have the R556 on the front of my wet-weather commuter; it works OK. I am using Kool-Stop pads. One trick is that I use washers between the brake shoes and the arms, and longer than stock shoe mounting bolts. This compensates for the narrow rim; the brake is clearly designed for a rim somewhere in the 27-30 mm width and I am using 21 mm wide rims. As stated, it is a clear step up from the Weinmann 610 that was on the bike before; part of that is the issue of centerpull brake hanger flex.

        I have no idea why I did not add washers between the arms and shoes on the Zero-G brakes. That would have been a big improvement. The brakes would bottom out on the adjusting screw unless I had that set up with no available adjustment.

        Michael Wilson
      • chkamb
        Dear Michael, Would be nice if you could post a picture of your washer solution (or send me a pm with a picture). I think this is interesting for many members.
        Message 3 of 13 , May 5, 2010
          Dear Michael,

          Would be nice if you could post a picture of your washer solution (or send me a pm with a picture). I think this is interesting for many members. The longer mounting bolts trick is very interesting - I will tell it to my neighbour..
          Thanks,
          Chris

          --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Mike Wilson <mwilson@...> wrote:
          >
          > chkamb" chkamb@... writes:
          >
          > I have a Tektro R556 rear brake on my East German Diamant road bike. The reach of the brake is 55-73mm as the frame needs a rear reach of 62mm. Looks OK, brakes sufficiently (?). I sold the front brake to my neighbour who was building a low cost foixed gear bike with just a front brake. his experience is: wet and rainy weather: braking is challenging with the R556 ;-)
          > Chris
          > ----------------
          > I have the R556 on the front of my wet-weather commuter; it works OK. I am using Kool-Stop pads. One trick is that I use washers between the brake shoes and the arms, and longer than stock shoe mounting bolts. This compensates for the narrow rim; the brake is clearly designed for a rim somewhere in the 27-30 mm width and I am using 21 mm wide rims. As stated, it is a clear step up from the Weinmann 610 that was on the bike before; part of that is the issue of centerpull brake hanger flex.
          >
          > I have no idea why I did not add washers between the arms and shoes on the Zero-G brakes. That would have been a big improvement. The brakes would bottom out on the adjusting screw unless I had that set up with no available adjustment.
          >
          > Michael Wilson
          >
        • Rich
          Basically the same as using the included spacers on threaded brake pad cantilevers or V brakes to get the pad reach correct for the arm geometry. This is
          Message 4 of 13 , May 5, 2010
            Basically the same as using the included spacers on threaded brake pad cantilevers or V brakes to get the pad reach correct for the arm geometry. This is covered in the documentation that came with my Avid Shorty 6 cantilever brakes.

            This, along with using brake pad holders with angle adjustment, should allow getting caliper brakes to work with a variety of rim widths narrower than the brakes are designed for.

            Rich Wood

            --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "chkamb" <chkamb@...> wrote:
            >
            > Dear Michael,
            >
            > Would be nice if you could post a picture of your washer solution (or send me a pm with a picture). I think this is interesting for many members. The longer mounting bolts trick is very interesting - I will tell it to my neighbour..
            > Thanks,
            > Chris
            >
            > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Mike Wilson <mwilson@> wrote:
            > >
            > > chkamb" chkamb@ writes:
            > >
            > > I have a Tektro R556 rear brake on my East German Diamant road bike. The reach of the brake is 55-73mm as the frame needs a rear reach of 62mm. Looks OK, brakes sufficiently (?). I sold the front brake to my neighbour who was building a low cost foixed gear bike with just a front brake. his experience is: wet and rainy weather: braking is challenging with the R556 ;-)
            > > Chris
            > > ----------------
            > > I have the R556 on the front of my wet-weather commuter; it works OK. I am using Kool-Stop pads. One trick is that I use washers between the brake shoes and the arms, and longer than stock shoe mounting bolts. This compensates for the narrow rim; the brake is clearly designed for a rim somewhere in the 27-30 mm width and I am using 21 mm wide rims. As stated, it is a clear step up from the Weinmann 610 that was on the bike before; part of that is the issue of centerpull brake hanger flex.
            > >
            > > I have no idea why I did not add washers between the arms and shoes on the Zero-G brakes. That would have been a big improvement. The brakes would bottom out on the adjusting screw unless I had that set up with no available adjustment.
            > >
            > > Michael Wilson
            > >
            >
          • Rich
            Here is another trick, courtesy of Sheldon Brown, on using modern recessed nut brake calipers on older bikes with mountings intended for the old externally
            Message 5 of 13 , May 5, 2010
              Here is another trick, courtesy of Sheldon Brown, on using modern recessed nut brake calipers on older bikes with mountings intended for the old externally nutted brakes.

              http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_ra-e.html#recessed

              Two front calipers are required.

              Rich Wood

              --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "Rich" <astronut1001@...> wrote:
              >
              > Basically the same as using the included spacers on threaded brake pad cantilevers or V brakes to get the pad reach correct for the arm geometry. This is covered in the documentation that came with my Avid Shorty 6 cantilever brakes.
              >
              > This, along with using brake pad holders with angle adjustment, should allow getting caliper brakes to work with a variety of rim widths narrower than the brakes are designed for.
              >
              > Rich Wood
              >
              > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "chkamb" <chkamb@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Dear Michael,
              > >
              > > Would be nice if you could post a picture of your washer solution (or send me a pm with a picture). I think this is interesting for many members. The longer mounting bolts trick is very interesting - I will tell it to my neighbour..
              > > Thanks,
              > > Chris
              > >
              > > --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Mike Wilson <mwilson@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > chkamb" chkamb@ writes:
              > > >
              > > > I have a Tektro R556 rear brake on my East German Diamant road bike. The reach of the brake is 55-73mm as the frame needs a rear reach of 62mm. Looks OK, brakes sufficiently (?). I sold the front brake to my neighbour who was building a low cost foixed gear bike with just a front brake. his experience is: wet and rainy weather: braking is challenging with the R556 ;-)
              > > > Chris
              > > > ----------------
              > > > I have the R556 on the front of my wet-weather commuter; it works OK. I am using Kool-Stop pads. One trick is that I use washers between the brake shoes and the arms, and longer than stock shoe mounting bolts. This compensates for the narrow rim; the brake is clearly designed for a rim somewhere in the 27-30 mm width and I am using 21 mm wide rims. As stated, it is a clear step up from the Weinmann 610 that was on the bike before; part of that is the issue of centerpull brake hanger flex.
              > > >
              > > > I have no idea why I did not add washers between the arms and shoes on the Zero-G brakes. That would have been a big improvement. The brakes would bottom out on the adjusting screw unless I had that set up with no available adjustment.
              > > >
              > > > Michael Wilson
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • Mike Wilson
              Sometimes when you convert an old bike to recessed nuts, a rear brake can be used on the front with a LONG brake nut. It depends on the thickness of the fork
              Message 6 of 13 , May 6, 2010
                Sometimes when you convert an old bike to recessed nuts, a rear brake can be used on the front with a LONG brake nut. It depends on the thickness of the fork crown. You do have to think about the brake pads. I believe I was able to do that on the Paramount with the R556s.

                What I do not understand is that the Paramount did not work with the Weinmann 610s and Shimano brifters, but the Motobecane Nomad snow bike works just fine that way. My only guess is the shorter clearance on the Motobecane.

                Michael Wilson
              • Mike Wilson
                I have started mounting my rear brakes inside the rear triangle when possible. This allows easy access to the brake mount bolt for fender mounting. I try to
                Message 7 of 13 , May 6, 2010
                  I have started mounting my rear brakes inside the rear triangle when possible. This allows easy access to the brake mount bolt for fender mounting. I try to make my fenders go on and off easily. This allows the bike to go into a car trunk with less effort.

                  Michael Wilson
                • Rick Paulos
                  Paramounts have been around since the 1940s but they were changed repeatedly. Built in Chicago, Wisconsin, Japan, Taiwan, made by Serrotta, etc. One local
                  Message 8 of 13 , May 6, 2010
                    Paramounts have been around since the 1940s but they were changed
                    repeatedly. Built in Chicago, Wisconsin, Japan, Taiwan, made by
                    Serrotta, etc. One local lbs has a very decent Paramount from the
                    early years, its a 3 speed (sturmey archer) up right bike with all
                    steel components. I'd guess they peaked in popularity in the
                    1970s. But they weren't racing bikes then. In the 1970s, touring
                    was the peak of cycling in the USA and that was Schwinn's market for
                    the paramount.

                    I owned a 72 paramount and I still own a 73 Raleigh International I
                    bought new. They are nearly identical bikes. 531, nervex lugs,
                    mostly campy with weinman brakes stock. I exchanged my sewups for
                    clinchers. About the same price too. If you wanted a racing bike,
                    you paid $175 more and bought a raleigh pro. Tighter frame and all
                    campy. Then in 1974 came the Masi's Whoo hooo. The immaculate lug
                    work made all the other bikes look cheap and set the standard for all
                    bikes since.

                    The french Motobecanes had more euro racing influence. They were
                    competing with peugeot, gitane, lejune and other companies supplying
                    racing bikes to the pros.

                    I owned a Nomad too. Ugh. Bottom of the line. We had 1 that failed
                    in the bike shop. The steerer tube is seamed low carbon steel. The
                    expander from the stem split the seam open. The owner kept crankin
                    on the stem bolt until the fork locked up inside the frame. it
                    was bugger to remove.

                    Rick

                    At 10:09 AM 5/6/2010, you wrote:
                    >Sometimes when you convert an old bike to recessed nuts, a rear
                    >brake can be used on the front with a LONG brake nut. It depends on
                    >the thickness of the fork crown. You do have to think about the
                    >brake pads. I believe I was able to do that on the Paramount with the R556s.
                    >
                    >What I do not understand is that the Paramount did not work with the
                    >Weinmann 610s and Shimano brifters, but the Motobecane Nomad snow
                    >bike works just fine that way. My only guess is the shorter
                    >clearance on the Motobecane.
                    >
                    >Michael Wilson
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >------------------------------------
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