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Re: Belt drive IGH bike for touring

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  • prester_john_in_cathay
    ... Well, there are hills and then there are hills, and ~in general~ the grades in the Rockies aren t that steep. Several round-the-world cyclists have
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 4, 2009
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      > I've toured the Rockies on a bike
      > with 27" to 90" gear, I had about
      > 50lbs on the bike. My wife had the
      > same gears and ~30lbs of gear. We
      > never had any issues.

      Well, there are hills and then there are hills, and ~in general~ the grades in the Rockies aren't that steep. Several round-the-world cyclists have commented that America's toughest touring is in the Ozarks: nasty, short, steep little climbs one after the other all day long.

      For N.A. cycle climbing enthusasts I can recommend "The Complete Guide to Climbing by Bike" by John Summerson which lists many but not all of the super steep big road climbs in the USA and compares them to classic climbs in the grand professional races in Europe.

      For "unconventional drive bicycle" fans, you may enjoy this youtube video of a purpose built "climbing" bike:

      <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgIL6eHHgZU>

      Best,
      PJ
    • Rich
      If they could stop the traffic long enough a Criterium race held on the hilly streets of San Francisco would be interesting ;-) Some of those streets are a
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 4, 2009
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        If they could stop the traffic long enough a Criterium race held on the hilly streets of San Francisco would be interesting ;-) Some of those streets are a lot steeper than anything I have seen in any mountain stages in Europe.

        Rich Wood


        --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "prester_john_in_cathay" <prester_john_in_cathay@...> wrote:
        >
        > > I've toured the Rockies on a bike
        > > with 27" to 90" gear, I had about
        > > 50lbs on the bike. My wife had the
        > > same gears and ~30lbs of gear. We
        > > never had any issues.
        >
        > Well, there are hills and then there are hills, and ~in general~ the grades in the Rockies aren't that steep. Several round-the-world cyclists have commented that America's toughest touring is in the Ozarks: nasty, short, steep little climbs one after the other all day long.
        >
        > For N.A. cycle climbing enthusasts I can recommend "The Complete Guide to Climbing by Bike" by John Summerson which lists many but not all of the super steep big road climbs in the USA and compares them to classic climbs in the grand professional races in Europe.
        >
        > For "unconventional drive bicycle" fans, you may enjoy this youtube video of a purpose built "climbing" bike:
        >
        > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgIL6eHHgZU>
        >
        > Best,
        > PJ
        >
      • palatine_ej
        ... PJ, I agree. Max grade is ~7% in the Rockies. The hills in Southern Wisconsin are a harder grind. So is 8 hours into a 20mph wind on a flat road. 27
        Message 3 of 12 , Dec 4, 2009
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          > Well, there are hills and then there are hills, and ~in general~ the grades in the Rockies aren't that steep.

          PJ, I agree. Max grade is ~7% in the Rockies. The hills in Southern Wisconsin are a harder grind. So is 8 hours into a 20mph wind on a flat road. 27" gear is pretty low for a touring bike on paved roads. I ride with a 22" low gear on my mountain bike...All IGH :~)
          Eric
        • Rich
          My Civia Hyland Rohloff came stock with a 21 low and 110 high. I have not needed either the low or high gears yet! It could go considerably lower while
          Message 4 of 12 , Dec 4, 2009
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            My Civia Hyland Rohloff came stock with a 21" low and 110" high. I have not needed either the low or high gears yet! It could go considerably lower while still remaining within the Rohloff listed input ratio limits. The stock high gear is higher than professional racers used to use I believe as their high was typically 13/52 or about 108".

            It seems to me that with 11 tooth minimum rear sprockets commonly installed that most road bikes are way overgeared in high for anything but fast descents. Also per tests I have seen the smallest sprockets are less efficient and reportedly wear out relatively fast if used much.

            Rich Wood


            --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, "palatine_ej" <danstrom@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Well, there are hills and then there are hills, and ~in general~ the grades in the Rockies aren't that steep.
            >
            > PJ, I agree. Max grade is ~7% in the Rockies. The hills in Southern Wisconsin are a harder grind. So is 8 hours into a 20mph wind on a flat road. 27" gear is pretty low for a touring bike on paved roads. I ride with a 22" low gear on my mountain bike...All IGH :~)
            > Eric
            >
          • Mark Stonich
            ... Need lower gearing? No. Want lower or higher gearing? Maybe. The way to get low gears with IGH is simple; exceed the mfgrs. conservative input ratio
            Message 5 of 12 , Dec 6, 2009
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              At  12/3/2009 12:57 AM +0000, you wrote:
                Several interesting IGH bikes use Gates Carbon Drive belt. Some of these are not sold in the USA apparently.

              http://www.carbondrivesystems.com/contact.php?lang=us

              My aim is to start doing some loaded touring. Civia Bryant and Tout Terrain Metropolitan have my attn. I love the Shimano-8 hub on my shaft-drive bike. Never seen or tried a Rohloff. Would touring need lower gearing that an Alfine 8-speed provides?

              "Need" lower gearing? No.  "Want" lower or higher gearing? Maybe.  The way to get low gears with IGH is simple; exceed the mfgrs. conservative input ratio limits.  I'm realistic about my gearing needs at the top end and riding an SS has caused me to develop a fairly wide useful RPM range.  I find I can climb at a really low cadence when needed and I know that pedalling downhill is a waste of energy.   I have 4 bikes with SA S5 hubs with a total range of 225%. I see no shame in walking a really steep pitch but haven't had to yet.   And only once have I encountered a tailwind so strong that I could have used a higher gear for more than a couple of miles. 

              BTW I'm a not particularly fit 63 y/o heart patient.

              Part of the equation is "Will you be traveling alone?".  Hills are much easier when you are alone because you can just climb at whatever pace is comfortable.  Some hills might take a little longer than if you had the optimum gear for that situation.  But you may feel that's a fair trade off for the advantages of an IGH

              Of course if you are touring in an area with ridiculous grades and carrying 80 lbs of gear, disregard the above.

              Mark Stonich;
                BikeSmith Design & Fabrication
                  5349 Elliot Ave S. Minneapolis, Minnesota 55417 USA
                       Ph. (612) 824-2372  http://bikesmithdesign.com
                                   http://mnhpva.org

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