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Educating derailer folks

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  • j_tdd
    Do you ever get blank stare reaction when you mention Internal Gear Hub bikes to other cyclists? I get that all the time, with comments such as I ve never
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 2, 2009
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      Do you ever get blank stare reaction when you mention Internal Gear Hub bikes to other cyclists? I get that all the time, with comments such as "I've never seen on of those." Sure each arrangement has +/-. I had a derailer hanger snap in two at 12mph, during easy pedaling on level ground. My neighbor snapped a hanger twice on a new carbon Schwinn. Mine sheared with < 1000 miles on the bike, locking the rear wheel. Also, wouldn't IGH rear wheels be stronger, not being "dished?" Thanks for your comments. I've much to learn.
    • John Baldwin
      Don t forget the added strength of the comparatively gargantuan hub flange and the fact that most IGHs are drilled for 32 or more spokes. They re also better
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 2, 2009
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        Don't forget the added strength of the comparatively gargantuan hub flange and the fact that most IGHs are drilled for 32 or more spokes.
        They're also better suited for cold and/ or wet conditions.  IGHs perform as well in the "crappiest" weather as they would on an epic day in the middle of summer.  Which is great for serious cyclists and seasoned commuters; which is to say maybe .0001 percent of americans.  The blank stare is probably coming from the same people who ask me if I "ride road or mountain".  Am I a spandex clad superman with a campy 11 speed gruppo or am I a sometimes enthusiast who throws his $3k downhill rig into his $30k truck to hit the trails over the weekend.
        "I'm a commuter."  I don't own a car and haven't for 6 years.  I ride throughout the year in any weather condition you can imagine and, more often than not, have fun while doing it.  And, while I don't always ride a bike that utilizes an IGH, I find that very few setups I own run as smoothly (and, strangely, as versatile) as my old 7 speed Nexus.  Certainly not my STI fed 24-speed setup.  Not even 2x10-speed road bikes I've used.
        For me there are a lot of reasons why "outboard" derailleur systems fall short and they all seem to be fueled by keeping the setup lightweight, which is very much an american obsession applied to bikes that were never meant to be raced competitively.  There is a reason why the Dutch primarily use geared hubs, drum brakes, hub generator lights, etc... they've been riding for generations upon generations, have more experience riding as a viable means of transportation and they far surpass the average american when it comes to being bike savvy.
        The shop I work at currently carries 3 models that run an IGH.  That's 3 out of maybe 70 bike models we offer.  We could get 3 more but the management won't because most bikes equipped with geared hubs (usually Alfine 8-speed) are over a grand (retail), sometimes well over.  We do offer one bike that runs a Nexus 3 with coaster brake for less than $300.  We sold out of that model within the first month.
        I bet we'll see a lot more IGH bikes when average cyclists start realizing the truly valuable utility these hubs afford and begin asking for more affordable bikes that are equipped with them.    
        -JB

        On Wed, Dec 2, 2009 at 8:04 PM, j_tdd <joetodd@...> wrote:
         

        Do you ever get blank stare reaction when you mention Internal Gear Hub bikes to other cyclists? I get that all the time, with comments such as "I've never seen on of those." Sure each arrangement has +/-. I had a derailer hanger snap in two at 12mph, during easy pedaling on level ground. My neighbor snapped a hanger twice on a new carbon Schwinn. Mine sheared with < 1000 miles on the bike, locking the rear wheel. Also, wouldn't IGH rear wheels be stronger, not being "dished?" Thanks for your comments. I've much to learn.


      • Joseph Shaul
        More importantly, geared hubs are a lot harder to damage. Don t tell me I m the only one to return to the bike rack to find someone s pushed my rear derailleur
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 2, 2009
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          More importantly, geared hubs are a lot harder to damage. Don't tell me I'm the only one to return to the bike rack to find someone's pushed my rear derailleur out of whack.

          On Wed, Dec 2, 2009 at 8:19 PM, John Baldwin <johnbaldwin207@...> wrote:
           

          Don't forget the added strength of the comparatively gargantuan hub flange and the fact that most IGHs are drilled for 32 or more spokes.
          They're also better suited for cold and/ or wet conditions.  IGHs perform as well in the "crappiest" weather as they would on an epic day in the middle of summer.  Which is great for serious cyclists and seasoned commuters; which is to say maybe .0001 percent of americans.  The blank stare is probably coming from the same people who ask me if I "ride road or mountain".  Am I a spandex clad superman with a campy 11 speed gruppo or am I a sometimes enthusiast who throws his $3k downhill rig into his $30k truck to hit the trails over the weekend.
          "I'm a commuter."  I don't own a car and haven't for 6 years.  I ride throughout the year in any weather condition you can imagine and, more often than not, have fun while doing it.  And, while I don't always ride a bike that utilizes an IGH, I find that very few setups I own run as smoothly (and, strangely, as versatile) as my old 7 speed Nexus.  Certainly not my STI fed 24-speed setup.  Not even 2x10-speed road bikes I've used.
          For me there are a lot of reasons why "outboard" derailleur systems fall short and they all seem to be fueled by keeping the setup lightweight, which is very much an american obsession applied to bikes that were never meant to be raced competitively.  There is a reason why the Dutch primarily use geared hubs, drum brakes, hub generator lights, etc... they've been riding for generations upon generations, have more experience riding as a viable means of transportation and they far surpass the average american when it comes to being bike savvy.
          The shop I work at currently carries 3 models that run an IGH.  That's 3 out of maybe 70 bike models we offer.  We could get 3 more but the management won't because most bikes equipped with geared hubs (usually Alfine 8-speed) are over a grand (retail), sometimes well over.  We do offer one bike that runs a Nexus 3 with coaster brake for less than $300.  We sold out of that model within the first month.
          I bet we'll see a lot more IGH bikes when average cyclists start realizing the truly valuable utility these hubs afford and begin asking for more affordable bikes that are equipped with them.    
          -JB

          On Wed, Dec 2, 2009 at 8:04 PM, j_tdd <joetodd@...> wrote:
           

          Do you ever get blank stare reaction when you mention Internal Gear Hub bikes to other cyclists? I get that all the time, with comments such as "I've never seen on of those." Sure each arrangement has +/-. I had a derailer hanger snap in two at 12mph, during easy pedaling on level ground. My neighbor snapped a hanger twice on a new carbon Schwinn. Mine sheared with < 1000 miles on the bike, locking the rear wheel. Also, wouldn't IGH rear wheels be stronger, not being "dished?" Thanks for your comments. I've much to learn.



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