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Re: The Ideal Kids First Multispeed Bike?

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  • Rich
    Mark; See! As a custom fabricator you have a lot more expertise in this area than I have. Thanks as I am learning a lot. I have never heard of or seen the
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 6, 2009
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      Mark;

      See! As a custom fabricator you have a lot more expertise in this area than I have. Thanks as I am learning a lot.

      I have never heard of or seen the Huret Demulitiplicator Relais. Do you have a link to a description and/or picture?

      The LBS I deal with primarily has done some custom work for disabled bicyclists from what the owner has told me. One I see riding around town is a one armed Vietnam veteran.

      Rich Wood


      --- In Geared_hub_bikes@yahoogroups.com, Mark Stonich <mark@...> wrote:
      >
      > At 10/6/2009 02:24 AM +0000, Rich wrote:
      > >Mark;
      > >
      > >I was thinking the 5 to 7 year old category as I have seen some
      > >posts on BF indicating that is the age where grip shifters can be
      > >difficult to operate for some kids. Some I have tried seemed to be
      > >pretty stiff operating. I do not have any kids of my own which is
      > >why I just tossed it out as an idea and asked for input.
      > >
      > >Heck I have read of adults who could not seem to learn how to best
      > >use a derailleur gear setup.
      >
      > IGH twist shifters may require more force than the lightest action
      > derailleur twisters. But years ago I built a recumbent for a 7 year
      > old with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis. His hand strength was well
      > below normal yet he had no problem using Shimano's light action
      > twister. BTW He went into remission a few years ago and has done
      > some Triathalons.
      >
      > This year I built a recumbent for a woman with severe hand
      > problems. I used SRAM X05 rear der, and twisters. Even though I had
      > to provide wrist supports so she didn't have to grasp the bars most
      > of the time, she shifts OK.
      >
      > At 5 y/o my boys were using a SunTour BarCon shifter with a 3 speed
      > freewheel and a Huret Svelto on a 500A (ETRTO 440-37) wheeled Gitane
      > "Midget Racer".
      > http://www.gitaneusa.com/images/catalog/1975_pg5.jpg The only alloy
      > parts were the brakes, levers and chainguard, yet because it was so
      > small it was under 20 lbs.
      >
      > I used a Huret Demultiplicator Relais to allow me to loosen up the shifter.
      >
      >
      > Mark Stonich;
      > BikeSmith Design & Fabrication
      > 5349 Elliot Ave S. Minneapolis, Minnesota 55417 USA
      > Ph. (612) 824-2372 http://bikesmithdesign.com
      > http://mnhpva.org
      >
    • Mark Stonich
      ... Of course you haven t, it doesn t exist. I had a brain fart. Should have written SIMPLEX Demulitiplicator Relais.
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 6, 2009
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        At  10/6/2009 06:37 PM +0000, you wrote:
        Mark;

        See! As a custom fabricator you have a lot more expertise in this area than I have. Thanks as I am learning a lot.

        I have never heard of or seen the Huret Demulitiplicator Relais. 

        Of course you haven't, it doesn't exist.  I had a brain fart. Should have written SIMPLEX Demulitiplicator Relais.
        http://velobase.com/CompImages/SmallParts/3E640426-0814-4319-95C1-A182B4A79C62.jpeg

        Do you have a link to a description and/or picture?

        Here's one of mine I made a braze on fitting for, 25 years ago.
        http://bikesmithdesign.com/fittings/demultiplicator.JPG 
        I'd never heard of one being brazed on.   But now that I'm aware of the French Constructeurs, I'm sure it wasn't the 1st.

        It works a bit like a Travel Agent in reverse.  5mm of cable travel at 3kg of force going in is translated to 3mm of cable travel at 5kg of force going out.  Meant for use with bar end shifters. 

        The LBS I deal with primarily has done some custom work for disabled bicyclists from what the owner has told me. One I see riding around town is a one armed Vietnam veteran.

        A large part of my work is for people with some sort of "Special Needs".  Definitely the most satisfying part. 

        Mark Stonich;
          BikeSmith Design & Fabrication
            5349 Elliot Ave S. Minneapolis, Minnesota 55417 USA
                 Ph. (612) 824-2372  http://bikesmithdesign.com
                             http://mnhpva.org

      • prester_john_in_cathay
        ... SRAM offers a Bandix twist shifter for their three speed hubs that s supposed to require less force to twist. Indications are this shifter is for the
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 9, 2009
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          > The trigger shifter is easier to
          > operate than the typical derailleur
          > grip shifter...

          SRAM offers a "Bandix" twist shifter for their three speed hubs that's supposed to require less force to twist. Indications are this shifter is for the Euro kid's bikes market. Never seen one, don't know if it does the job.

          > Maybe a coaster rear brake and a
          > hand operated front one?

          My experience has been most kids can shift OK before they're 100% reliable on hand brakes. The front caliper/rear coaaster seems like a good set up on a child's first geared bike.

          > Should there be 16" and 20" IGH bikes
          > aimed at the kids market...

          Yes.

          > or would they
          > have to be too expensive to sell well?

          The way this used to work in America was that affluent families bought nice bikes for their children. When said children outgrew the bikes, they were sold on the used market and passed down through many kids and several socioeconomic levels.

          Today the children of affluent families play Dave Mirra on their Wii in front of the big screen and are hauled to school, scouts and organized sports in SUVs. Kids down the socioeconomic ladder get POS bikes from big box stores.

          PJ
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