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Re: [7mm] Re: Lift-off cab roof

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  • Jim Snowdon
    One of the eternal problems of etched kit design is how to deal with a cab where the side sheet is carried up into the roof, as typified by the later Midland
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 7, 2007
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      One of the eternal problems of etched kit design is how to deal with a cab where the side sheet is carried up into the roof, as typified by the later Midland locomitives, as well as the GWR Collet-era tank locomotive cabs. I can't speak about the kit in question, but I would support the opinion that, on the whole, it is high time the Guild served its members by printing accurate and honest reviews. There are more than a few kits (and kit designers) out there whose products are being bought by the unsuspecting. Given the prices being charged, such an introduction to O gauge is liable to lead to the victims abandoning the scale entirely in favour of something simpler or out of the box. Some suppliers of less reputable kits might go under, but which is better for the hobby - good products that encourage further modelling, or a wider range of duds that only put people off repeating the experience. I would suggest that it is a proper task for the Guild to be promoting the former.

      And, yes, this has drifted off-topic to the extent of being more within the domain of the GaugeO e-group, which is why, to save the Moderator's rod, I have copied it there, where the debate may continue.

      Jim
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Colin Dowling
      To: 7mm@...
      Sent: Saturday, October 06, 2007 3:13 PM
      Subject: [7mm] Re: Lift-off cab roof


      --- In 7mm@..., John Berry <urljon@...> wrote:
      >Hi John, It is a good kit as are most of his kits and as you say the
      roof does let it down . I think next time it would have to be cab
      side sheets and roof all in one.
      Shame the Gazette would not print your review as this is supposed to
      be the country of free speech..."if the truth hurts..." you know what
      I mean John.There are some awful kits still on the market from years
      back and I think it is bad that some beginners by some of these kits
      not realising what they have taken on.

      Regards Colin.
      > Hi Colin,
      > That cab roof is the one weak point in Big Jims design - but don't
      > suggest that to him as he gets very upset. When I mentioned it in
      my
      > review of building the kit for the Gazette some years ago he made
      such a
      > fuss about the comment they decided not to print the review. Shame
      as in
      > all other respects it is a very nice kit. If I built another I
      would
      > scrap the white metal roof and make a new one in brass.
      > Regards
      > John Berry
      >
      >
      > Colin Dowling wrote:
      > > --- In 7mm@..., "Terry Dumbrell" <terry.dumbrell@>
      > > wrote:
      > >
      > >>Hi All, On the Connoissuer Jinty kit, which has a cast metal
      roof,I
      > >
      > > marked the position of the outer rain strip and cut the roof both
      > > sides at this point.Then soldered the outer portions to the the
      cab
      > > sides blending in the joint so as to look as one.The centre
      section
      > > then has the rain strips soldered on with the outer ones covering
      the
      > > joint.The gap created byby the saw can be taken up by soldering
      some
      > > thin brass strip along the edge of the joints.
      > > all the best Colin
      > >
      > >>Hi,
      > >>
      > >>When the loco has a folded-over roof [like the SDJR Bagnalls, aka
      > >>Jinties on lesser railways], making it hard to disguise a join, I
      > >>make the roof complete with cab front, sides and back as a
      separate
      > >>item, down to tank-level. I then solder locating pins inside each
      > >>corner, which locate into holes, with enough springiness to grip.
      > >>
      > >>Another trick I use for fitting crew and other items in the cab
      is
      > >
      > > to
      > >
      > >>make the cab floor from thin ply [suitably scribed and stained]
      and
      > >>to glue crew and upstands, etc, to that floor. Then, I drop the
      > >
      > > floor
      > >
      > >>into position, making it a friction-fit. I then carefully half-
      > >
      > > close
      > >
      > >>the cab-doors so that the ply is trapped beneath them.
      > >>
      > >>Taken together with the boiler front assembly [aka "backhead"],
      it
      > >>means that I have three sub-assemblies that can be detailed "off-
      > >>model" before positioning, and could be easily removed when the
      > >
      > > loco
      > >
      > >>needs refurbishment, as all garden-railway models do from time to
      > >>time.
      > >>
      > >>I can take some photos and post them if it is of interest to
      anyone,
      > >>
      > >>Terry
      > >>
      > >>--- In 7mm@..., michealsteve@ wrote:
      > >>
      > >>>I fit to my tanks too - I solder some brass wires to the
      > >
      > > underside
      > >
      > >>of the
      > >>
      > >>>roof with a right angle bends and glue some tube to the two
      > >
      > > front
      > >
      > >>corners of
      > >>
      > >>>the cab and the wire inserts into these and holds the roof
      > >
      > > secure.
      > >
      > >>Just needs
      > >>
      > >>>careful measuring and some trial and error.
      > >>>Mike
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >>>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >





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