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Re: Garmin 60csx -- flying

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  • Jim
    A question here, All the rules on electronics with flying say that you have to turn off a GPS unit while flying. Does anyone know the reason, are they truly
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 1, 2008
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      A question here,
      All the rules on electronics with flying say that you have to turn
      off a GPS unit while flying. Does anyone know the reason, are they
      truly prohibited, etc. I did use my 60csx once while flying but
      needed to keep it right by the window to work.

      Jim


      --- In GarminGPSMAP60C_60CS@yahoogroups.com, Warren Ferguson
      <wferguson12@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have an older 60CS. I have Roads and Rec and City Navigator North
      America and City Navigator Australia for it. I use it on the road to
      route to destinations. It was invaluable when we spent a month in
      Australia! The main enjoyment I use mine for is Geocaching. I have
      logged hundreds of geocaches and seen things and places I would have
      never knew were there. I have had the pleasure of meeting many new
      people on the trail as well. I also use it when hiking or just to see
      how far I have walked the dog! Works great for return to the best
      fising spot. Play around with your new toy. It will do many things
      you may never use. Its fun to have on a plane hooked to a lap top and
      watch what you are flying over. The users on this site are far more
      advanced than I and will be able to answer any of your questions. Go
      to Geocaching.com for a high tech treasure hunt! There is no cost to
      join. My geocahing name is Reddodger. Hope to see you on the trail
      sometime!
      > Enjoy
      >
      > Warren
      > Pocatello, Idaho
      >
    • Amir Findling K9CHP
      It depends on the airline s policy. You can check it on their website or sometimes in the airline magazine that is the the seat pocket. When I use my 60CSx in
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 1, 2008
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        It depends on the airline's policy. You can check it on their website or sometimes in the airline magazine that is the the seat pocket.
        When I use my 60CSx in an airplane I add a Gilsson external antenna that I slide just under the plastic shutter and get good reception like that, constellation allowing of course.
        I've used my 60CSx in helicopters in SAR missions and the pilot did not mind at all. No need for external antenna there.

        73 de K9CHP Amir Findling

        73 de K9CHP Amir Findling, Member ARRL, WAC
        K9 Certification Tester, NYS Federation of SAR Teams
        1st Special Response Group (1SRG)



        Jim wrote:

        A question here,
        All the rules on electronics with flying say that you have to turn
        off a GPS unit while flying. Does anyone know the reason, are they
        truly prohibited, etc. I did use my 60csx once while flying but
        needed to keep it right by the window to work.

        Jim

        --- In GarminGPSMAP60C_ 60CS@yahoogroups .com, Warren Ferguson
        <wferguson12@ ...> wrote:
        >
        > I have an older 60CS. I have Roads and Rec and City Navigator North
        America and City Navigator Australia for it. I use it on the road to
        route to destinations. It was invaluable when we spent a month in
        Australia! The main enjoyment I use mine for is Geocaching. I have
        logged hundreds of geocaches and seen things and places I would have
        never knew were there. I have had the pleasure of meeting many new
        people on the trail as well. I also use it when hiking or just to see
        how far I have walked the dog! Works great for return to the best
        fising spot. Play around with your new toy. It will do many things
        you may never use. Its fun to have on a plane hooked to a lap top and
        watch what you are flying over. The users on this site are far more
        advanced than I and will be able to answer any of your questions. Go
        to Geocaching.com for a high tech treasure hunt! There is no cost to
        join. My geocahing name is Reddodger. Hope to see you on the trail
        sometime!
        > Enjoy
        >
        > Warren
        > Pocatello, Idaho
        >

      • prathman@comcast.net
        From: Jim ... Certainly not all the rules - most airlines allow passenger use of GPS receivers under the same terms as other
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 1, 2008
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          From: "Jim" <docsoc007@...>
          > A question here,
          > All the rules on electronics with flying say that you have to turn
          > off a GPS unit while flying. Does anyone know the reason, are they
          > truly prohibited, etc. I did use my 60csx once while flying but
          > needed to keep it right by the window to work.

          Certainly not "all the rules" - most airlines allow passenger use of GPS receivers under the same terms as other electronics such as laptops, i.e. when at cruising altitude. However, some airlines are more restrictive and don't allow use at any time on their flights. A fairly up-to-date list is kept at:
          http://gpsinformation.net/airgps/airgps.htm (note that there's some discrepancy about Qantas - Joe indicates that based on an email from a 'Tania' at their websupport he included them as allowing use, but their website still lists usage as prohibited and I've also gotten emails from their customer service to that effect).

          While GPS receivers do emit small amounts of EMI (electro-magnetic intererence), this is also true of other electronic devices such as laptops, PDAs, electronic watches, etc. AFAIK, there has never been a case of interference by a passenger's GPS on a commercial airliner. OTOH, there have been a small number of such cases with laptops, electronic games, and cellphones, so the stricter rules applied by some airlines (see list above) on GPS receivers don't appear to be justified.

          BTW, when possible I try to use one of the carriers listed as permitting use on the above site and have used my Garmin eMap on many flights. I hold the unit up to the window to get an initial lock and can then frequently set it on the edge of the seat tray or on the armrest and continue to track our path. Sometimes it'll lose the satellite lock and I'll again put it right by the window to regain it. I've also used it with an external antenna on a flight where I was in a middle seat and got permission of the passenger by the window to clip the antenna to the window shade.

          Peter Rathmann
        • Warren Ferguson
          Posted by: prathman@comcast.net prathman@comcast.net prathman Tue Jan 1, 2008 2:10 pm (PST) From: Jim ... Certainly not all
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 2, 2008
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            Posted by: "prathman@..." prathman@...   prathman

            Tue Jan 1, 2008 2:10 pm (PST)

            From: "Jim" <docsoc007@yahoo. com>
            > A question here,
            > All the rules on electronics with flying say that you have to turn
            > off a GPS unit while flying. Does anyone know the reason, are they
            > truly prohibited, etc. I did use my 60csx once while flying
            but
            > needed to keep it right by the window to work.

            Certainly not "all the rules" - most airlines allow passenger use of GPS receivers under the same terms as other electronics such as laptops, i.e. when at cruising altitude. However, some airlines are more restrictive and don't allow use at any time on their flights. A fairly up-to-date list is kept at:
            http://gpsinformati on.net/airgps/ airgps.htm (note that there's some discrepancy about Qantas - Joe indicates that based on an email from a 'Tania' at their websupport he included them as allowing use, but their website still lists usage as prohibited and I've also gotten emails from their customer service to that effect).

            While GPS receivers do emit small amounts of EMI (electro-magnetic intererence) , this is also true of other electronic devices such as laptops, PDAs, electronic watches, etc. AFAIK, there has never been a case of interference by a passenger's GPS on a commercial airliner. OTOH, there have been a small number of such cases with laptops, electronic games, and cellphones, so the stricter rules applied by some airlines (see list above) on GPS receivers don't appear to be justified.

            BTW, when possible I try to use one of the carriers listed as permitting use on the above site and have used my Garmin eMap on many flights. I hold the unit up to the window to get an initial lock and can then frequently set it on the edge of the seat tray or on the armrest and continue to track our path. Sometimes it'll lose the satellite lock and I'll again put it right by the window to regain it. I've also used it with an external antenna on a flight where I was in a middle seat and got permission of the passenger by the window to clip the antenna to the window shade.

            Peter Rathmann
             
            It was Quantas we flew to Australia and they had no problem with my GPS except for take off and landing.
             
            Warren
            Pocatello, Idaho
          • prathman@comcast.net
            From: Warren Ferguson ... It depends on the individual flight crew, but unfortunately not all of the ones on Qantas are as reasonable
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 2, 2008
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              From: Warren Ferguson <wferguson12@...>
              > Posted by: "prathman@..." prathman@... prathman Tue Jan 1,

              > Certainly not "all the rules" - most airlines allow passenger use of GPS
              > receivers under the same terms as other electronics such as laptops, i.e. when
              > at cruising altitude. However, some airlines are more restrictive and don't
              > allow use at any time on their flights. A fairly up-to-date list is kept at:
              > http://gpsinformati on.net/airgps/ airgps.htm (note that there's some
              > discrepancy about Qantas - Joe indicates that based on an email from a 'Tania'
              > at their websupport he included them as allowing use, but their website still
              > lists usage as prohibited and I've also gotten emails from their customer
              > service to that effect).
              >
              > While GPS receivers do emit small amounts of EMI (electro-magnetic intererence)
              > , this is also true of other electronic devices such as laptops, PDAs,
              > electronic watches, etc. AFAIK, there has never been a case of interference by a
              > passenger's GPS on a commercial airliner. OTOH, there have been a small number
              > of such cases with laptops, electronic games, and cellphones, so the stricter
              > rules applied by some airlines (see list above) on GPS receivers don't appear to
              > be justified.
              ...
              > It was Quantas we flew to Australia and they had no problem with my GPS except
              > for take off and landing.

              It depends on the individual flight crew, but unfortunately not all of the ones on Qantas are as reasonable as yours was. As long as some of their flight crews object and the company's website at:
              http://www.qantas.com.au/info/flying/inTheAir/communications#jump1
              continues to classify passenger use of "global positioning systems" under the category of radio transmission and list it as prohibited at all times then I'll continue to regard their airline as one of the minority which is unfriendly in regard to use of GPS receivers.
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