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Re: UKRAINIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

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  • Laurence
    / Full guide is here: http://stamforddio.org/wa_files/Pastoral_20Guide_20for_20the_20UCC_20in_20the_20United_20States_20of_20America.pdf /
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 14, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      /

      Full guide is here:

      http://stamforddio.org/wa_files/Pastoral_20Guide_20for_20the_20UCC_20in_20the_20United_20States_20of_20America.pdf


      /



      --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, Gerald Tobin <tobinger@...> wrote:
      >
      > PASTORAL GUIDE
      > of the
      > UKRAINIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH
      > in the
      > UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
      > THE ARCHEPARCHY OF PHILADELPHIA
      > THE EPARCHY
      > 1999
      >
      > The Ukrainians are a Slavic people which inhabit the
      > land north of the Black Sea. Ukraine is abutted, counting from
      > the west, by these nations: Moldova, Romania, Slovakia,
      > Poland, Belarus, and Russia. The population is now 53 million,
      > of which Ukrainian Catholics constitute 13.5% and Roman
      > Catholics one percent, the majority are Eastern Orthodox.
      >
      > Christianity came sporadically to Ukraine in the 9th
      > century, and was permanently planted there by King St.
      > Volodymyr, who received baptism in 988. Christianity came to
      > Ukraine from Constantinople (today Istanbul), then the center of
      > the Eastern Roman Empire.
      >
      > Ukraine was directly exposed to the inroads of numerous
      > Asiatic nomad peoples, especially the Tartars and then the
      > Turks, who destroyed the flourishing Ukrainian culture and
      > commonwealth. The western part of Ukraine came in the 14th
      > century under the dominion of the Polish-Lithuanian
      > Commonwealth. The western part being thereby exposed to the
      > influence of western European culture and the Catholic Church,
      > the bishops of Ukraine and Belarus in Poland-Lithuania decided
      > at a synod in Brest in 1595 to unite themselves with the Holy
      > See of Rome, which union was consummated in Rome in 1596.
      > The resulting Ruthenian Catholic Church flourished despite
      > enormous difficulties. However, with the ascendancy of Russia
      > in the 18th and 19th century, the Church was brutally
      > suppressed by the Russian tsars. Only in the south-western part
      > the Ukraine could the Church be saved thanks to the Hapsburgs,
      > the Catholic emperors of Austria, to whom since 1772 this part
      > of Ukraine belonged.
      >
      > Emulating the progress of the Latin Catholic Church in
      > Austria, the Ukrainian Church, then called Greek–Catholic
      > Church, to distinguish it from the Roman-Catholic and the
      > Armenian-Catholic Churches, had been organized into the
      > ecclesiastical province of Lviv-Halich in 1807; it evolved into
      > the largest and most advanced Eastern Catholic Church
      > anywhere in the world. After Poland had occupied Western
      > Ukraine between 1918 and 1939, it was returned to Ukraine
      > under the Soviet Union, from which it gained freedom in 1991,
      > and is now known as the Ukrainian Republic.
      >
      > The Ukrainian Catholic Church had been cruelly
      > suppressed by the Soviet government in 1946, and the churches
      > and institutions handed over to the Russian Patriarchate of
      > Moscow. However, the traditions of the Ukrainian Catholics
      > were preserved by those who had emigrated to the Americas
      > since 1880 and, in addition, after World War II, to Western
      > Europe and Australia. Pope Paul VI declared in 1963 the
      > Metropolitan Church of Lviv-Halich to be a Major
      > Archiepiscopate, which is a self-governing sui iuris patriarchal
      > Church
      >
      > The Ukrainian Church is now centered in Lviv, Ukraine,
      > where His Beatitude, the Major Archbishop resides and the
      > Synod of some 35 bishops convenes regularly. The Church
      > counts seven eparchies (dioceses) in Ukraine, and four in
      > Western Europe, five in Canada, four in the United States, one
      > each in Brazil, Argentina and Australia.
      >
      > Ukrainians (known then as "Ruthenians") began to
      > immigrate to the United States since 1880. Their first priest and
      > church was established in 1884, followed then over the next
      > twenty years by hundreds of parishes and missions under the
      > jurisdiction of the local Latin Ordinary. Pope St. Pius X sent
      > them the first bishop in the person of Soter Stephen Ortynsky in
      > 1907. He was supposed to receive jurisdiction of a vicar general
      > from each Latin bishop where Ukrainian communities were
      > established. Bishop Ortynsky had under his care also the Slavic
      > relatives and neighbors of the Ukrainians (Ruthenians), Slovaks
      > and Croats from Austro-Hungary.
      >
      > After the premature death of Bishop Ortynsky in 1916,
      > the Holy See permitted the parishes of the two groups to split
      > according to their provenience in Europe, establishing thereby
      > two jurisdictions, with seats in Philadelphia, PA for the
      > Ukrainians (Ruthenians) who came from Galicia and Bukovina
      > provinces of present Western Ukraine and Pittsburgh, PA for the
      > Ruthenians who came from the Carpathian province of present
      > Western Ukraine. Both ordinariates received bishops in 1924.
      > The situation was somewhat changed when after World War II
      > several hundred thousand Ukrainian refugees immigrated to the
      > United States. As a consequence, a Ukrainian eparchy (diocese)
      > was erected in Stamford, CT, for the states of New York and
      > New England (1956). In 1958 Pope John XXIII erected the
      > Ukrainian metropolitan province for the United States, with the
      > seat of the archbishop in Philadelphia. The eparchy of St.
      > Nicholas of Chicago, IL, for the parishes west of Ohio till the
      > Pacific ocean, was erected in 1961, and the eparchy of SI.
      > Josaphat of Parma, OH in 1983, for the faithful in Pennsylvania
      > west of Harrisburg till the western boundary of Ohio, and
      > southwards including Texas and Florida.
      >
      > Second Vatican Council and the Eastern Code declared
      > the Ukrainian Church to be a self-governing patriarchal Major
      > Archiepiscopate, of which the U. S. metropolitan province and
      > the four eparchies forma part. Being outside the historical
      > territory of the Church, the U.S. eparchies are under the direct
      > jurisdiction of the Pope of Rome, even though they retain their
      > membership in the Ukrainian Church and are also under the
      > authority of the Major Archbishop and the Synod of Bishops.
      >
      > Within the United States Catholic Church, the Ukrainian
      > bishops have territorial jurisdiction, limited to their own faithful,
      > in the same way as that of the Latin ordinaries is limited to the
      > Latin faithful.
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Robert Cham
      Where does Canada, specifically Manitoba, fit in all of this? Bob Cham
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 14, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Where does Canada, specifically Manitoba, fit in all of this?

        Bob Cham



        >PASTORAL GUIDE
        >of the
        >UKRAINIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH
        >in the
        >UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
        >THE ARCHEPARCHY OF PHILADELPHIA
        >THE EPARCHY
        >1999
        >
        >The Ukrainians are a Slavic people which inhabit the
        >land north of the Black Sea. Ukraine is abutted, counting from
        >the west, by these nations: Moldova, Romania, Slovakia,
        >Poland, Belarus, and Russia. The population is now 53 million,
        >of which Ukrainian Catholics constitute 13.5% and Roman
        >Catholics one percent, the majority are Eastern Orthodox.
        >
        >Christianity came sporadically to Ukraine in the 9th
        >century, and was permanently planted there by King St.
        >Volodymyr, who received baptism in 988. Christianity came to
        >Ukraine from Constantinople (today Istanbul), then the center of
        >the Eastern Roman Empire.
        >
        >Ukraine was directly exposed to the inroads of numerous
        >Asiatic nomad peoples, especially the Tartars and then the
        >Turks, who destroyed the flourishing Ukrainian culture and
        >commonwealth. The western part of Ukraine came in the 14th
        >century under the dominion of the Polish-Lithuanian
        >Commonwealth. The western part being thereby exposed to the
        >influence of western European culture and the Catholic Church,
        >the bishops of Ukraine and Belarus in Poland-Lithuania decided
        >at a synod in Brest in 1595 to unite themselves with the Holy
        >See of Rome, which union was consummated in Rome in 1596.
        >The resulting Ruthenian Catholic Church flourished despite
        >enormous difficulties. However, with the ascendancy of Russia
        >in the 18th and 19th century, the Church was brutally
        >suppressed by the Russian tsars. Only in the south-western part
        >the Ukraine could the Church be saved thanks to the Hapsburgs,
        >the Catholic emperors of Austria, to whom since 1772 this part
        >of Ukraine belonged.
        >
        >Emulating the progress of the Latin Catholic Church in
        >Austria, the Ukrainian Church, then called Greek–Catholic
        >Church, to distinguish it from the Roman-Catholic and the
        >Armenian-Catholic Churches, had been organized into the
        >ecclesiastical province of Lviv-Halich in 1807; it evolved into
        >the largest and most advanced Eastern Catholic Church
        >anywhere in the world. After Poland had occupied Western
        >Ukraine between 1918 and 1939, it was returned to Ukraine
        >under the Soviet Union, from which it gained freedom in 1991,
        >and is now known as the Ukrainian Republic.
        >
        >The Ukrainian Catholic Church had been cruelly
        >suppressed by the Soviet government in 1946, and the churches
        >and institutions handed over to the Russian Patriarchate of
        >Moscow. However, the traditions of the Ukrainian Catholics
        >were preserved by those who had emigrated to the Americas
        >since 1880 and, in addition, after World War II, to Western
        >Europe and Australia. Pope Paul VI declared in 1963 the
        >Metropolitan Church of Lviv-Halich to be a Major
        >Archiepiscopate, which is a self-governing sui iuris patriarchal
        >Church
        >
        >The Ukrainian Church is now centered in Lviv, Ukraine,
        >where His Beatitude, the Major Archbishop resides and the
        >Synod of some 35 bishops convenes regularly. The Church
        >counts seven eparchies (dioceses) in Ukraine, and four in
        >Western Europe, five in Canada, four in the United States, one
        >each in Brazil, Argentina and Australia.
        >
        >Ukrainians (known then as “Ruthenians”) began to
        >immigrate to the United States since 1880. Their first priest and
        >church was established in 1884, followed then over the next
        >twenty years by hundreds of parishes and missions under the
        >jurisdiction of the local Latin Ordinary. Pope St. Pius X sent
        >them the first bishop in the person of Soter Stephen Ortynsky in
        >1907. He was supposed to receive jurisdiction of a vicar general
        >from each Latin bishop where Ukrainian communities were
        >established. Bishop Ortynsky had under his care also the Slavic
        >relatives and neighbors of the Ukrainians (Ruthenians), Slovaks
        >and Croats from Austro-Hungary.
        >
        >After the premature death of Bishop Ortynsky in 1916,
        >the Holy See permitted the parishes of the two groups to split
        >according to their provenience in Europe, establishing thereby
        >two jurisdictions, with seats in Philadelphia, PA for the
        >Ukrainians (Ruthenians) who came from Galicia and Bukovina
        >provinces of present Western Ukraine and Pittsburgh, PA for the
        >Ruthenians who came from the Carpathian province of present
        >Western Ukraine. Both ordinariates received bishops in 1924.
        >The situation was somewhat changed when after World War II
        >several hundred thousand Ukrainian refugees immigrated to the
        >United States. As a consequence, a Ukrainian eparchy (diocese)
        >was erected in Stamford, CT, for the states of New York and
        >New England (1956). In 1958 Pope John XXIII erected the
        >Ukrainian metropolitan province for the United States, with the
        >seat of the archbishop in Philadelphia. The eparchy of St.
        >Nicholas of Chicago, IL, for the parishes west of Ohio till the
        >Pacific ocean, was erected in 1961, and the eparchy of SI.
        >Josaphat of Parma, OH in 1983, for the faithful in Pennsylvania
        >west of Harrisburg till the western boundary of Ohio, and
        >southwards including Texas and Florida.
        >
        >Second Vatican Council and the Eastern Code declared
        >the Ukrainian Church to be a self-governing patriarchal Major
        >Archiepiscopate, of which the U. S. metropolitan province and
        >the four eparchies forma part. Being outside the historical
        >territory of the Church, the U.S. eparchies are under the direct
        >jurisdiction of the Pope of Rome, even though they retain their
        >membership in the Ukrainian Church and are also under the
        >authority of the Major Archbishop and the Synod of Bishops.
        >
        >Within the United States Catholic Church, the Ukrainian
        >bishops have territorial jurisdiction, limited to their own faithful,
        >in the same way as that of the Latin ordinaries is limited to the
        >Latin faithful.
        >
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >------------------------------------
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >!DSPAM:639,51e2d541118074041461624!
      • Gerald Tobin
        Bob, See http://www.archeparchy.ca Jerry ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 16, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Bob,

          See http://www.archeparchy.ca

          Jerry

          On Jul 14, 2013, at 3:24 PM, Robert Cham <cham@...> wrote:

          > Manitoba



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Laurence
          Ukrainian Catholic Archeparchy of Winnipeg ╙ъЁр┐эё№ър ╩рЄюышЎ№ър └Ёїш║ярЁї│  т ┬│ээ│ях┤є The Archeparchy
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 16, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Ukrainian Catholic Archeparchy of Winnipeg
            Óêðà¿íñüêà Êàòîëèöüêà Àðõèºïàðõ³ÿ â ³íí³ïå´ó








            The Archeparchy of Winnipeg:

            The Archeparchy of Winnipeg is the Ukrainian Catholic Church in Manitoba.

            The Archeparchy contains some 130 parishes (of varying degrees of activity), some 30 eparchial priests, 11 priests serving from monastic communities or religious orders, 12 deacons, 23 nuns, and some 4,000 member Catholics.

            There is also one Catholic school and two Nursing Homes run by the Sisters Servants

            The head of the Archeparchy of Winnipeg, with authority over the entire Church in Manitoba (and all corresponding points north), is its Metropolitan Archbishop.

            The present ruling bishop of the Archeparchy is the Most Reverend Lawrence Huculak, O.S.B.M. (cf. administration).




            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------









            An "Eparchy": the particular Church

            An "eparchy" is the basic ecclesial institution of the Church. It is the church. Organizationally, it is the basic unit of the Church structure both legally and canonically.

            Each eparchy is made up of a Bishop or an "Eparch" and the Christian Faithful under his care, leadership, and authority.

            Eparchies are generally named after the city in which the bishop has his main church (a.k.a. the "Cathedral").

            An eparchy is at the very local level divided into parish churches. The parish church is a subset of the basic church unit - the eparchy.

            The bishop of the eparchy appoints local pastors or parish priests to assist him in caring for his Faithful who are gathered into these parish churches.




            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------









            The Archeparchy: a particular Church in Canada

            A group of eparchies form a grouping of the churches called a "Metropolia". The five Ukrainian Catholic eparchies (i.e. particular churches) in Canada form the Metropolia of Canada. Nevertheless, each eparchy remains a basic autonomous particular church.

            The first bishop of a Metropolia is called the "Metropolitan Archbishop" (or "Metropolitan" for short). His eparchy is called an "Archeparchy" because it is the eparchy of the first bishop - i.e. "Archbishop" (from the Greek, meaning "first bishop").

            The Metropolitan Archbishop coordinates the common actions of the eparchies in the ecclesial province or Metropolia. As all bishops are equal, the Metropolitan is not "in charge of" the other bishops in his Metropolia, nor does he interfere in the internal governance of his fellow bishops in their own eparchies.

            In Canada, the "Archeparchy" is the eparchy of Winnipeg, encompassing Manitoba and all points north.




            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------







            The Archeparchy and its Metropolia

            The Metropolia of Canada are made up of the following eparchies:

            the Archeparchy of Winnipeg

            (Manitoba and all points north)

            the Eparchy of Toronto and Eastern Canada

            (from Newfoundland to Ontario and the territories north therefrom)

            the Eparchy of Saskatoon

            (Saskatchewan and the territories north therefrom)

            the Eparchy of Edmonton

            (Alberta and the territories north therefrom)

            the Eparchy of New Westminster

            (British Columbia, Yukon, and the territories north therefrom)






            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



            The Archeparchy and the global Church

            The Archeparchy of Winnipeg together with all the other Ukrainian Catholic eparchies in the world come together to form the world-wide Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church.

            Thus our global church is an assembly/communion of local particular churches. These local particular churches are the "eparchies".

            Our global church has eparchies in North America, South America, Europe, Australia, Oceania, as well as parish churches in Asia.

            The first bishop of all the eparchies of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church is called the Patriarch. His main church and head office is in Kyiv, Ukraine. The present patriarch of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church is his Beatitude Sviatoslav Shevchuk.

            Each year, all the bishops of all the eparchies gather in the Holy Synod together with the Patriarch to deal with matters common to all eparchies and to make decisions affecting the global Church.




            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------







            The universal Catholic Communion

            Just as the Archeparchy is a member of the world-wide Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, so also, in its turn, the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church is one of the 22 churches that make up the universal Catholic Communion. And we are fully in communion with the Pope of Rome.

            Other Churches that are members the Catholic Communion are the Roman Catholic Church, the Coptic Catholic Church, the Maronite Catholic Church, the Chaldean Catholic Church, the Malabar Catholic Church, the Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church, the Melkite Greek Catholic Church, etc.

            The head of the Roman Catholic Church is the Pope of Rome.

            He is the bishop of the eparchy of Rome, Italy.

            Because he is bishop of Rome, ex officio he also serves as the first bishop of the entire universal Catholic Communion, and ex officio is the head of the Roman Catholic Church.






            --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, Gerald Tobin <tobinger@...> wrote:
            >
            > Bob,
            >
            > See http://www.archeparchy.ca
            >
            > Jerry
            >
            > On Jul 14, 2013, at 3:24 PM, Robert Cham <cham@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Manitoba
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Laurence
            / Eparch (eparchy plural) is equivalent to Roman Catholic Church terms diocese/dioceses. Those who use the US Library of Congress Romanization System will
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 16, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              /

              Eparch (eparchy plural) is equivalent to Roman Catholic Church terms diocese/dioceses.


              Those who use the US Library of Congress "Romanization System" will spell eparch as eparkh, as seen here:

              http://transfig.orthodoxws.com/files/Bulgakov/0690a.pdf


              \



              --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Ukrainian Catholic Archeparchy of Winnipeg
              > Óêðà¿íñüêà Êàòîëèöüêà Àðõèºïàðõ³ÿ â ³íí³ïå´ó
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > The Archeparchy of Winnipeg:
              >
              > The Archeparchy of Winnipeg is the Ukrainian Catholic Church in Manitoba.
              >
              > The Archeparchy contains some 130 parishes (of varying degrees of activity), some 30 eparchial priests, 11 priests serving from monastic communities or religious orders, 12 deacons, 23 nuns, and some 4,000 member Catholics.
              >
              > There is also one Catholic school and two Nursing Homes run by the Sisters Servants
              >
              > The head of the Archeparchy of Winnipeg, with authority over the entire Church in Manitoba (and all corresponding points north), is its Metropolitan Archbishop.
              >
              > The present ruling bishop of the Archeparchy is the Most Reverend Lawrence Huculak, O.S.B.M. (cf. administration).
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > An "Eparchy": the particular Church
              >
              > An "eparchy" is the basic ecclesial institution of the Church. It is the church. Organizationally, it is the basic unit of the Church structure both legally and canonically.
              >
              > Each eparchy is made up of a Bishop or an "Eparch" and the Christian Faithful under his care, leadership, and authority.
              >
              > Eparchies are generally named after the city in which the bishop has his main church (a.k.a. the "Cathedral").
              >
              > An eparchy is at the very local level divided into parish churches. The parish church is a subset of the basic church unit - the eparchy.
              >
              > The bishop of the eparchy appoints local pastors or parish priests to assist him in caring for his Faithful who are gathered into these parish churches.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > The Archeparchy: a particular Church in Canada
              >
              > A group of eparchies form a grouping of the churches called a "Metropolia". The five Ukrainian Catholic eparchies (i.e. particular churches) in Canada form the Metropolia of Canada. Nevertheless, each eparchy remains a basic autonomous particular church.
              >
              > The first bishop of a Metropolia is called the "Metropolitan Archbishop" (or "Metropolitan" for short). His eparchy is called an "Archeparchy" because it is the eparchy of the first bishop - i.e. "Archbishop" (from the Greek, meaning "first bishop").
              >
              > The Metropolitan Archbishop coordinates the common actions of the eparchies in the ecclesial province or Metropolia. As all bishops are equal, the Metropolitan is not "in charge of" the other bishops in his Metropolia, nor does he interfere in the internal governance of his fellow bishops in their own eparchies.
              >
              > In Canada, the "Archeparchy" is the eparchy of Winnipeg, encompassing Manitoba and all points north.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > The Archeparchy and its Metropolia
              >
              > The Metropolia of Canada are made up of the following eparchies:
              >
              > the Archeparchy of Winnipeg
              >
              > (Manitoba and all points north)
              >
              > the Eparchy of Toronto and Eastern Canada
              >
              > (from Newfoundland to Ontario and the territories north therefrom)
              >
              > the Eparchy of Saskatoon
              >
              > (Saskatchewan and the territories north therefrom)
              >
              > the Eparchy of Edmonton
              >
              > (Alberta and the territories north therefrom)
              >
              > the Eparchy of New Westminster
              >
              > (British Columbia, Yukon, and the territories north therefrom)
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >
              >
              >
              > The Archeparchy and the global Church
              >
              > The Archeparchy of Winnipeg together with all the other Ukrainian Catholic eparchies in the world come together to form the world-wide Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church.
              >
              > Thus our global church is an assembly/communion of local particular churches. These local particular churches are the "eparchies".
              >
              > Our global church has eparchies in North America, South America, Europe, Australia, Oceania, as well as parish churches in Asia.
              >
              > The first bishop of all the eparchies of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church is called the Patriarch. His main church and head office is in Kyiv, Ukraine. The present patriarch of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church is his Beatitude Sviatoslav Shevchuk.
              >
              > Each year, all the bishops of all the eparchies gather in the Holy Synod together with the Patriarch to deal with matters common to all eparchies and to make decisions affecting the global Church.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > The universal Catholic Communion
              >
              > Just as the Archeparchy is a member of the world-wide Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, so also, in its turn, the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church is one of the 22 churches that make up the universal Catholic Communion. And we are fully in communion with the Pope of Rome.
              >
              > Other Churches that are members the Catholic Communion are the Roman Catholic Church, the Coptic Catholic Church, the Maronite Catholic Church, the Chaldean Catholic Church, the Malabar Catholic Church, the Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church, the Melkite Greek Catholic Church, etc.
              >
              > The head of the Roman Catholic Church is the Pope of Rome.
              >
              > He is the bishop of the eparchy of Rome, Italy.
              >
              > Because he is bishop of Rome, ex officio he also serves as the first bishop of the entire universal Catholic Communion, and ex officio is the head of the Roman Catholic Church.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, Gerald Tobin <tobinger@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Bob,
              > >
              > > See http://www.archeparchy.ca
              > >
              > > Jerry
              > >
              > > On Jul 14, 2013, at 3:24 PM, Robert Cham <cham@> wrote:
              > >
              > > > Manitoba
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
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