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Re: Two Palm Sundays

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  • Laurence
    / Well, there are two Palm Sundays per year most of the time (an Orthodox Palm Sunday and a Roman Catholic Palm Sunday). But, there are no Orthodox in western
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 16, 2013
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      /

      Well, there are two Palm Sundays per year most of the time (an Orthodox Palm Sunday and a Roman Catholic Palm Sunday). But, there are no Orthodox in western Slovakia.

      ______

      Lavrentiy


      --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@...> wrote:
      >
      > /
      >
      > Ron,
      >
      > Is the translation accurate? There is only one Palm Sunday per year.
      >
      > ______
      >
      > Lavrentiy
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Ron" <amiak27@> wrote:
      > >
      > > On Slovak World the following question was posed:
      > >
      > > > Native speakers, I'm stuck trying to understand a sentence I ran
      > > > across in an article. It's talking about superstitions in western
      > > > Slovakia to protect babies from misfortune, and reads:
      > > >
      > > > "Matka nesmie diet'a kojit' dve Kvetne nedele, lebo by os~edivelo."
      > > > A mother didn't dare nurse her baby two Palm Sundays, lest the baby go > grey
      > >
      > > Is there any such saying or standard in the Slavic traditions further east or in Orthodox Christianity? It seems like the kind of saying that could have a broader origin than just in a local area.
      > >
      > > Ron
      > >
      >
    • Ron
      Yes, it seems some pretty good Slovak linguists have looked at the translation and question, and from the Slovak view it appears to mean two years . Again, I
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 16, 2013
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        Yes, it seems some pretty good Slovak linguists have looked at the translation and question, and from the Slovak view it appears to mean 'two years'. Again, I was wondering if there is any similar saying among the Eastern Slavs,of which we count.

        Slovaks also talk about "cousins of the second knee". which I have never had directly translated, but take to mean 'distant cousins'.

        Languages are fun, no? Look at the misunderstandings we can generate in our own native English language.

        Ron

        --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@...> wrote:
        >
        > /
        >
        > Ron,
        >
        > Is the trtanslation accurate? There is only one Palm Sunday per year.
        >
        > ______
        >
        > Lavrentiy
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Ron" <amiak27@> wrote:
        > >
        > > On Slovak World the following question was posed:
        > >
        > > > Native speakers, I'm stuck trying to understand a sentence I ran
        > > > across in an article. It's talking about superstitions in western
        > > > Slovakia to protect babies from misfortune, and reads:
        > > >
        > > > "Matka nesmie diet'a kojit' dve Kvetne nedele, lebo by os~edivelo."
        > > > A mother didn't dare nurse her baby two Palm Sundays, lest the baby go > grey
        > >
        > > Is there any such saying or standard in the Slavic traditions further east or in Orthodox Christianity? It seems like the kind of saying that could have a broader origin than just in a local area.
        > >
        > > Ron
        > >
        >
      • Laurence
        / Provide the entire entire paragraph which contains the sentence. _______ Lavrentiy
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 17, 2013
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          /

          Provide the entire entire paragraph which contains the sentence.

          _______

          Lavrentiy



          --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Ron" <amiak27@...> wrote:
          >
          > Yes, it seems some pretty good Slovak linguists have looked at the translation and question, and from the Slovak view it appears to mean 'two years'. Again, I was wondering if there is any similar saying among the Eastern Slavs,of which we count.
          >
          > Slovaks also talk about "cousins of the second knee". which I have never had directly translated, but take to mean 'distant cousins'.
          >
          > Languages are fun, no? Look at the misunderstandings we can generate in our own native English language.
          >
          > Ron
          >
          > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@> wrote:
          > >
          > > /
          > >
          > > Ron,
          > >
          > > Is the trtanslation accurate? There is only one Palm Sunday per year.
          > >
          > > ______
          > >
          > > Lavrentiy
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Ron" <amiak27@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > On Slovak World the following question was posed:
          > > >
          > > > > Native speakers, I'm stuck trying to understand a sentence I ran
          > > > > across in an article. It's talking about superstitions in western
          > > > > Slovakia to protect babies from misfortune, and reads:
          > > > >
          > > > > "Matka nesmie diet'a kojit' dve Kvetne nedele, lebo by os~edivelo."
          > > > > A mother didn't dare nurse her baby two Palm Sundays, lest the baby go > grey
          > > >
          > > > Is there any such saying or standard in the Slavic traditions further east or in Orthodox Christianity? It seems like the kind of saying that could have a broader origin than just in a local area.
          > > >
          > > > Ron
          > > >
          > >
          >
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