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Re: Never Give Up

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  • Laurence
    Hello Andrew, In Ukrainian language, a plishka is a small wedge and plishnia is a pickaxe. Maybe, plishka also is a wagtail in Ukrainian language -my
    Message 1 of 8 , May 4 7:17 AM
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      Hello Andrew,

      In Ukrainian language, a plishka is a small wedge and plishnia is a pickaxe. Maybe, plishka also is a wagtail in Ukrainian language -my dictionary does not have that ornithological term. On the otherhand, Polish dictionaries don't have the wedge term.

      Then the word plish means baldness.

      I'm not sure what is the root of my maternal ancestoral family name.

      _______

      Lavrentiy




      --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@...> wrote:
      >
      > /
      >
      > "Wiggle" the Wagtail:
      >
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWvAV44J1Qs
      >
      >
      > Male Grey Wagtail singing:
      >
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jmM8pbPJlvA
      >
      >
      >
      > Pliszka ���ta
      >
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GzVq52ImiE
      >
      >
      > Pliszka siwa
      >
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hSLWgOWiKg
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew" <andrzej_olejarz@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence Krupnak" <lkrupnak@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > /
      > > >
      > > > Whoopi ...happy feet: dance TONIGHT:
      > > >
      > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XaMdsrGYeG8
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Never give up.
      > > >
      > > > I was searching for a Plishka family in the 1920 PA census.
      > > > [Pliszka is the way Poles would spell it.] Plishka are actually a Rusyn
      > > > family.
      > > >
      > > > Anyway, I tried the Ancestry.com indexes. Couldn't find the
      > > > family no matter what I did with the index search program that THEY
      > > > have:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=6061
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Then I tried the Heritage Quest census index. Their index broke
      > > > the wall down.!!!!.
      > > >
      > > > In their index the family name is given as Polesco.
      > > >
      > > > I went back to Ancestry to see how they indexed that family.
      > > > Their index has Chesco!!!
      > > >
      > > > Examing the record, the handwriting is bad. However, Ancestry
      > > > indexers failed to study the handwriting long enough to see that the
      > > > spelling on the form is Polesco.
      > > >
      > > > ________
      > > >
      > > > Lavrentiy
      > >
      > > Hi, Lavrentiy !
      > > That's right, the surname Pliszka (read: Plishka),(in Eng. Wagtail), this is a Polish name. And Rusyns. And the name of a friendly bird.
      > > >
      > > Andrew
      > >
      >
    • Laurence
      / What is the root of the surname Jojkan (although not permitted in Polish orthography Yojkan)? The cyrillic letters ja, je, jo, and ju could be the first
      Message 2 of 8 , May 4 8:03 AM
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        /

        What is the root of the surname Jojkan (although not permitted in Polish orthography Yojkan)?

        The cyrillic letters ja, je, jo, and ju could be the first letter of Jojkan. On candidate wored in Ukrainian language is the word ekonom which means land-steward or husbandman.

        ________

        Lavrentiy



        --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello Andrew,
        >
        > In Ukrainian language, a plishka is a small wedge and plishnia is a pickaxe. Maybe, plishka also is a wagtail in Ukrainian language -my dictionary does not have that ornithological term. On the otherhand, Polish dictionaries don't have the wedge term.
        >
        > Then the word plish means baldness.
        >
        > I'm not sure what is the root of my maternal ancestoral family name.
        >
        > _______
        >
        > Lavrentiy
      • Andrew
        ... Hello, Lavrentiy!. Source: Aleksander Brückner Etymological Dictionary of Polish Language , publisher: Wiedza Powszechna, Warsaw 1989: Password:
        Message 3 of 8 , May 4 8:15 AM
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          --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence Krupnak" <lkrupnak@...> wrote:
          >
          > /
          >
          > Whoopi ...happy feet: dance TONIGHT:
          >
          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XaMdsrGYeG8
          >
          >
          > Never give up.
          >
          > I was searching for a Plishka family in the 1920 PA census.
          > [Pliszka is the way Poles would spell it.] Plishka are actually a Rusyn
          > family.
          >
          > Anyway, I tried the Ancestry.com indexes. Couldn't find the
          > family no matter what I did with the index search program that THEY
          > have:
          >
          >
          > http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=6061
          >
          >
          > Then I tried the Heritage Quest census index. Their index broke
          > the wall down.!!!!.
          >
          > In their index the family name is given as Polesco.
          >
          > I went back to Ancestry to see how they indexed that family.
          > Their index has Chesco!!!
          >
          > Examing the record, the handwriting is bad. However, Ancestry
          > indexers failed to study the handwriting long enough to see that the
          > spelling on the form is Polesco.

          > Lavrentiy


          Hello, Lavrentiy!.
          Source: Aleksander Brückner "Etymological Dictionary of Polish Language" ", publisher: Wiedza Powszechna, Warsaw 1989: Password: "Pliszka", page 418:
          "Pliszka, [or] pliskwa in the sixteenth century, today with the people: plistwa, the name of a bird and plays the peasant children (with sticks), with other Slavs: Pliska, as we have [in the Polish language] in 1500, with Cyganski in 1584 always the case, and only the second edition of [his Dictionary] adds pliszka; with us [in Poland] and elsewhere, and plizga, in the Ruthenian language: plizgawica and plizdawica ("zg" syllables and sometimes mixed with "zd") the name of the bird from the "gray color"?. ". I am convinced that the surname Pliszka however, comes from the Polish name of the bird: pliszka. It also demonstrates that the Poles were also called Ruthenians Greek Catholic religion. So it also indicates Polish or Polish-Rusyn roots of your relative. Regards, dear Friend !.
          Andrew
        • Laurence
          / Thank you Andrew. What is your opinion that Plishka could also mean pickaxe? ________ Lavrentiy ... Pliszka, [or] pliskwa in the sixteenth century, today
          Message 4 of 8 , May 4 8:25 AM
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            /


            Thank you Andrew.

            What is your opinion that Plishka could also mean pickaxe?

            ________

            Lavrentiy



            --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew" <andrzej_olejarz@...> wrote:
            >


            > Hello, Lavrentiy!.
            > Source: Aleksander Brückner "Etymological Dictionary of Polish Language" ", publisher: Wiedza Powszechna, Warsaw 1989: Password: "Pliszka", page 418:
            "Pliszka, [or] pliskwa in the sixteenth century, today with the people: plistwa, the name of a bird and plays the peasant children (with sticks), with other Slavs: Pliska, as we have [in the Polish language] in 1500, with Cyganski in 1584 always the case, and only the second edition of [his Dictionary] adds pliszka; with us [in Poland] and elsewhere, and plizga, in the Ruthenian language: plizgawica and plizdawica ("zg" syllables and sometimes mixed with "zd") the name of the bird from the "gray color"?. ". I am convinced that the surname Pliszka however, comes from the Polish name of the bird: pliszka. It also demonstrates that the Poles were also called Ruthenians Greek Catholic religion. So it also indicates Polish or Polish-Rusyn roots of your relative. Regards, dear Friend !.
            > Andrew
          • Andrew
            ... Lavrentiy Hello, Lavrentiy! I think, however, that your cousin s name is derived from the name of the przemi³ego, a small bird. We let in this case into
            Message 5 of 8 , May 4 11:12 AM
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              --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@...> wrote:
              > Thank you Andrew.
              > What is your opinion that Plishka could also mean pickaxe?
              Lavrentiy

              Hello, Lavrentiy!
              I think, however, that your cousin's name is derived from the name of the przemi³ego, a small bird. We let in this case into account the realities of ethno-semantic. Does on the Rusyn village so widely used small pick, since their names were created peasant nicknames?. It is from these very rural nicknames nicknames created most of the peasants' names, which later, after the emancipation of the peasants and registration of their names have become independent of their ethnic and cultural diversity. National consciousness of the peasants as you know, began to take shape in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe very late and highly influenced by the national bourgeoisie zrewolucjonizowanej. I think in a similar way resulting from the names of birds names Kruk (Raven) and Krukowski, Slowik (Nightingale)and S³owikowski, Wrona and Wronski, Gawron and Gawronski, etc.. Pliszka (Wagtail) is a nice, singing bird, so good and accurate nickname for someone who liked the whistle, for example, pretending to be singing wild birds. And as he heard the neighbors, so it was dubbed anyway!. Just!. And believe me, there was no difference here whether he was a Pole, Ukrainian or Ruthenian. It is simply our common, Slavic folk tradition.

              Andrew
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