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Re: Interesting 1881 article about Galician immigrant mother giving birth on train

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  • Laurence
    / What the heck....here are two. No more for me. http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=delivering+a+baby+in+a++movie&aq=f
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 5, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      /

      What the heck....here are two. No more for me.

      http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=delivering+a+baby+in+a++movie&aq=f


      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MpfohJY_2i4




      --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@...> wrote:
      >
      > Justin,
      >
      > There are some great videos on You tube. I will not provide links because some people here may find the whole subject "Off-Topic"
      >
      > _______
      >
      > Lavrentiy
      >
      >
      > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@> wrote:
      > >
      > > /
      > >
      > >
      > > Justin,
      > >
      > > We need an obstetrician or licensed midwife about the water question.
      > >
      > > _________
      > >
      > > Lavrentiy
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > /
      > > >
      > > > Osobnica is near Jaslo.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Justin" <jkhouser84@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > The following was posted to the Blair County, PA genealogy list at Rootsweb.com. Since it concerns an immigrant family from Osobnica (their spelling), Galicia, I thought it worth sharing here.
      > > > >
      > > > > Lots to discuss, too - the family, the village, the ice-water custom and, of course, curiosity to see if one can figure out what became of these people.
      > > > >
      > > > > From the Altoona Morning Tribune, Monday, June 6, 1881:
      > > > >
      > > > > LOCAL AFFAIRS.
      > > > > USHERED INTO EXISTENCE AT 25 MILES AN HOUR.
      > > > >
      > > > > Just after the emigrant train left Harrisburg yesterday morning the
      > > > > strange actions of a number of feminine Polish travelers attracted the attention of one of the train hands, and upon investigation he learned that an interesting event was about to transpire, and inasmuch as the accommodation for such an occurrence were rather limited, and being unable to understand the language spoken by the women, News Agent Nathanson was called upon to act as interpreter. When it was learned that another passenger was about to be
      > > > > added to the already crowded car, hasty preparations for the unusual event were made for the comfort of the mother, and at 9:10 o'clock, while speeding over the rail at twenty-five miles an hour, a bouncing girl, weighing probably twelve pounds, was born near Haley's station. Of course the arrival of the little emigrant, under circumstances so unusual, caused considerable excitement on the train, and when it was learned that the mother had passed
      > > > > safely through her accouchement, the news was received with delight by all on board. The names of the parents of the little stranger are John and Agate Byezeck. They are from Osobnica, province of Galizia, and their destination is No. 30 McHenry street, Chicago, which city they had hoped to reach before the youngster put in an appearance, with what success has already appeared. The train men were as attentive as the delicate nature of the case would permit,
      > > > > and every convenience and comfort possible was afforded the mother. At Mifflin tempting delicacies were procured for the mother by Mr. Nathanson, and at Cove Forge hot water for bathing purposes was also furnished, when to his dismay it was learned that the newly arrived infant had been treated to a bath of ice water, from the cooler in the car, and when his surprise was expressed to the attendants they united in the expression that the cold water would make the baby grow. The proposition that the mother should be left on the way
      > > > > was made, but after consideration she concluded to proceed on her journey, which she did, arriving in this city at 2 o'clock yesterday
      > > > > afternoon. A certificate of the date and place of the child's birth was given the parents, who wanted to pay for all the kind attention shown them, but no one would accept any remuneration. Mr. Nathanson, however, asked the privilege of naming the little one, which being granted, he called her Clara Ellide, after his wife, whose mysterious disappearance some time ago has been the subject of a notice in the TRIBUNE. When the train left the city yesterday both mother and child were getting along nicely. This is the second
      > > > > event of the kind which has occurred within the past three months.
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Laurence
      / The first link was wrong...here s the one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4pOSNcEOaTI
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 5, 2011
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        /

        The first link was wrong...here's the one:

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4pOSNcEOaTI



        --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@...> wrote:
        >
        > /
        >
        > What the heck....here are two. No more for me.
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=delivering+a+baby+in+a++movie&aq=f
        >
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MpfohJY_2i4
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Justin,
        > >
        > > There are some great videos on You tube. I will not provide links because some people here may find the whole subject "Off-Topic"
        > >
        > > _______
        > >
        > > Lavrentiy
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > /
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Justin,
        > > >
        > > > We need an obstetrician or licensed midwife about the water question.
        > > >
        > > > _________
        > > >
        > > > Lavrentiy
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > /
        > > > >
        > > > > Osobnica is near Jaslo.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Justin" <jkhouser84@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > The following was posted to the Blair County, PA genealogy list at Rootsweb.com. Since it concerns an immigrant family from Osobnica (their spelling), Galicia, I thought it worth sharing here.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Lots to discuss, too - the family, the village, the ice-water custom and, of course, curiosity to see if one can figure out what became of these people.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > From the Altoona Morning Tribune, Monday, June 6, 1881:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > LOCAL AFFAIRS.
        > > > > > USHERED INTO EXISTENCE AT 25 MILES AN HOUR.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Just after the emigrant train left Harrisburg yesterday morning the
        > > > > > strange actions of a number of feminine Polish travelers attracted the attention of one of the train hands, and upon investigation he learned that an interesting event was about to transpire, and inasmuch as the accommodation for such an occurrence were rather limited, and being unable to understand the language spoken by the women, News Agent Nathanson was called upon to act as interpreter. When it was learned that another passenger was about to be
        > > > > > added to the already crowded car, hasty preparations for the unusual event were made for the comfort of the mother, and at 9:10 o'clock, while speeding over the rail at twenty-five miles an hour, a bouncing girl, weighing probably twelve pounds, was born near Haley's station. Of course the arrival of the little emigrant, under circumstances so unusual, caused considerable excitement on the train, and when it was learned that the mother had passed
        > > > > > safely through her accouchement, the news was received with delight by all on board. The names of the parents of the little stranger are John and Agate Byezeck. They are from Osobnica, province of Galizia, and their destination is No. 30 McHenry street, Chicago, which city they had hoped to reach before the youngster put in an appearance, with what success has already appeared. The train men were as attentive as the delicate nature of the case would permit,
        > > > > > and every convenience and comfort possible was afforded the mother. At Mifflin tempting delicacies were procured for the mother by Mr. Nathanson, and at Cove Forge hot water for bathing purposes was also furnished, when to his dismay it was learned that the newly arrived infant had been treated to a bath of ice water, from the cooler in the car, and when his surprise was expressed to the attendants they united in the expression that the cold water would make the baby grow. The proposition that the mother should be left on the way
        > > > > > was made, but after consideration she concluded to proceed on her journey, which she did, arriving in this city at 2 o'clock yesterday
        > > > > > afternoon. A certificate of the date and place of the child's birth was given the parents, who wanted to pay for all the kind attention shown them, but no one would accept any remuneration. Mr. Nathanson, however, asked the privilege of naming the little one, which being granted, he called her Clara Ellide, after his wife, whose mysterious disappearance some time ago has been the subject of a notice in the TRIBUNE. When the train left the city yesterday both mother and child were getting along nicely. This is the second
        > > > > > event of the kind which has occurred within the past three months.
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Justin
        I found our Byezeck family. From the Hamburg Immigration lists, we find Joh. BYCZEK, age 28, his wife, Agathe BYCZEK, age 27, and a child Marianna BYCZEK,
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 5, 2011
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          I found our "Byezeck" family.

          From the Hamburg Immigration lists, we find Joh. BYCZEK, age 28, his wife, Agathe BYCZEK, age 27, and a child Marianna BYCZEK, age 1. They were all from Osobnice, Galizien, and were boarding the ship "Vesta" on May 16, 1881, in Hamburg. The ship was bound for America via London.

          I couldn't find this family's arrival in America. Maybe someone else can. It would be interesting to see where they landed and then took the train through Harrisburg toward Chicago. Philadelphia or Baltimore seem most likely, no?

          In the 1900, they are still living at 13 McHenry Street in West Town, Chicago: John BYCZEK, born Mar. 1853 in Austrian Poland, immigrated in 1881, Aggie BYCZEK, born Dec. 1855 in Austrian Poland, immigrated in 1881, married for 22 years, mother of five children, three living, daughter Anna, born Aug. 1883, Cathrine, born Aug. 1885, and Andrew, born Sept. 1887, all children born in Illinois. The father was a day laborer (crossed out) and the daughters were glove makers. He was naturalized and they lived in a rented house.

          As a sad denouement: So it appears that Marianna (born ca. 1880), who immigrated with them from Osobnice, and little Clara Ellide (born June 5, 1881, on board the immigrant train near Haley's Station, Pa.) both passed away in their childhood, before the 1900 census.

          According to this record, John Byczek returned to Poland in 1903, where he was still living in 1922. His son Andrew stayed in America and went to Poland in 1922 to visit his relatives:
          http://search.ancestry.com/iexec?htx=View&r=an&dbid=1174&iid=USM1490_1939-0068&fn=Andrew&ln=Byczek&st=r&ssrc=&pid=672592

          I'm not going to follow this further (no relation) but perhaps someone searching for this family will come across the info in a Google Search. For us, at least, it gives an interesting picture of a very early Galician immigrant experience.

          Justin

          --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@...> wrote:
          >
          > Justin,
          >
          > There are some great videos on You tube. I will not provide links because some people here may find the whole subject "Off-Topic"
          >
          > _______
          >
          > Lavrentiy
          >
          >
          > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@> wrote:
          > >
          > > /
          > >
          > >
          > > Justin,
          > >
          > > We need an obstetrician or licensed midwife about the water question.
          > >
          > > _________
          > >
          > > Lavrentiy
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence" <Lkrupnak@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > /
          > > >
          > > > Osobnica is near Jaslo.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Justin" <jkhouser84@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > The following was posted to the Blair County, PA genealogy list at Rootsweb.com. Since it concerns an immigrant family from Osobnica (their spelling), Galicia, I thought it worth sharing here.
          > > > >
          > > > > Lots to discuss, too - the family, the village, the ice-water custom and, of course, curiosity to see if one can figure out what became of these people.
          > > > >
          > > > > From the Altoona Morning Tribune, Monday, June 6, 1881:
          > > > >
          > > > > LOCAL AFFAIRS.
          > > > > USHERED INTO EXISTENCE AT 25 MILES AN HOUR.
          > > > >
          > > > > Just after the emigrant train left Harrisburg yesterday morning the
          > > > > strange actions of a number of feminine Polish travelers attracted the attention of one of the train hands, and upon investigation he learned that an interesting event was about to transpire, and inasmuch as the accommodation for such an occurrence were rather limited, and being unable to understand the language spoken by the women, News Agent Nathanson was called upon to act as interpreter. When it was learned that another passenger was about to be
          > > > > added to the already crowded car, hasty preparations for the unusual event were made for the comfort of the mother, and at 9:10 o'clock, while speeding over the rail at twenty-five miles an hour, a bouncing girl, weighing probably twelve pounds, was born near Haley's station. Of course the arrival of the little emigrant, under circumstances so unusual, caused considerable excitement on the train, and when it was learned that the mother had passed
          > > > > safely through her accouchement, the news was received with delight by all on board. The names of the parents of the little stranger are John and Agate Byezeck. They are from Osobnica, province of Galizia, and their destination is No. 30 McHenry street, Chicago, which city they had hoped to reach before the youngster put in an appearance, with what success has already appeared. The train men were as attentive as the delicate nature of the case would permit,
          > > > > and every convenience and comfort possible was afforded the mother. At Mifflin tempting delicacies were procured for the mother by Mr. Nathanson, and at Cove Forge hot water for bathing purposes was also furnished, when to his dismay it was learned that the newly arrived infant had been treated to a bath of ice water, from the cooler in the car, and when his surprise was expressed to the attendants they united in the expression that the cold water would make the baby grow. The proposition that the mother should be left on the way
          > > > > was made, but after consideration she concluded to proceed on her journey, which she did, arriving in this city at 2 o'clock yesterday
          > > > > afternoon. A certificate of the date and place of the child's birth was given the parents, who wanted to pay for all the kind attention shown them, but no one would accept any remuneration. Mr. Nathanson, however, asked the privilege of naming the little one, which being granted, he called her Clara Ellide, after his wife, whose mysterious disappearance some time ago has been the subject of a notice in the TRIBUNE. When the train left the city yesterday both mother and child were getting along nicely. This is the second
          > > > > event of the kind which has occurred within the past three months.
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
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