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Re: [GaliciaPoland-Ukraine] Logging camp Name in Syberia

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  • Roman
    Michael, Sound files are sometimes no less difficult to interpret than images with poor script. And in those cases it is very useful to have a fairly extensive
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 31, 2011
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      Michael,

      Sound files are sometimes no less difficult to interpret than images
      with poor script. And in those cases it is very useful to have a fairly
      extensive corpus to examine.

      For example, in a document with poor handwriting it is much easier to
      resolve the situation if you send the entire page with lots of examples
      rather than just the one word or one line of text. Similarly, with sound
      files it may be easier to understand the subject if you provide quite a
      bit more material and indicate where in that recording you are running
      into trouble. That way the interpreter can get used to the sound and
      language and perhaps make better sense of the speech.

      Provide a recording that is at least 5 times as long and include your
      best estimate of the transcript. That might help those who are trying to
      help you.

      Roman

      On 7/30/2011 12:58 PM, Michael Telega wrote:
      >
      >
      > I interviewed my 2nd cousin Czeslawa Golubienko (Telega). In the
      > interview she told me the name of the camp she was at. But could not
      > spell it for me. I will add a sound file of the interview where she says
      > the name of the camp where our family was deported to in siberia.
      >
      > I added the sound file in the files section named InterviewCehaTelega.mp3
      >
    • Danuta Janina Wójcik
      I have listened to Pani Czeslawa, over and over again. Michael, I am not sure she is telling you the name of the place, but using a term, rather than a proper
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 1, 2011
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        I have listened to Pani Czeslawa, over and over again. Michael, I am not sure she is telling you the name of the place, but using a term, rather than a proper name. It definately sounds as, Nowy cywilny (new civilian) - uczestnik (participant/entrant), but she is pronouncing, it as uczastnik (short "a" sound)

        Here are a few names you can ask her about --- Nowosibirk, Kustanajski (in the Kazachstan area) - in English Kazakhstan.

        http://en.infoglobe.cz/traveller-guide/a-journey-to-siberia-nowosibirsk/



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Laurence
        To: GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, July 31, 2011 8:48 AM
        Subject: [GaliciaPoland-Ukraine] Re: Logging camp Name in Syberia



        Michael,

        Spell the name and what part of Siberia?

        _______

        Lavrentiy

        --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Telega" <mtelegajr@...> wrote:
        >
        > I interviewed my 2nd cousin Czeslawa Golubienko (Telega). In the interview she told me the name of the camp she was at. But could not spell it for me. I will add a sound file of the interview where she says the name of the camp where our family was deported to in siberia.
        >
        > I added the sound file in the files section named InterviewCehaTelega.mp3
        >





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Laurence
        11. The logging camps were located along the rail lines, and where there was no railroad, along the rivers. They were moved, when the area was exhausted of
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 1, 2011
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          11. The logging camps were located along the rail lines, and where there was no railroad, along the rivers. They were moved, when the area was exhausted of trees generally thicker than 10 cm. Sawmills were located at major river confluences to make the rivers collect the logs cut to given lengths. On the work sites the logs were suitably piled on the ice of rivulets or ready for transport by trucks. When spring came, even smaller rivers were flooded by the large amount of melting snow and carried the logs to the sawmills. For transport on the larger river logs were tied with steel ropes into rafts. When arriving at a mill, the wires were cut, and the logs were stored separated with a floating log fence from the river. Among the logs a passage way was cleared on which the logs were pushed by workers on the floating logs toward a rotating toothed chain transporter. This picked up the logs and carried them to the saws to be cut to desired beams and lumber. - 50 cm was the average log size. While there were 100 cm thick logs, they were not popular, because they were hard to handle. The frame-saws were driven by electricity, like the main east-west two-track railroad lines in Northern Siberia. On the smaller side lines, wood burning, steam driven locomotives were used for freight trains and with few exceptions two-three passenger cars attached to theiends.

          12. The camps were supplied on log roads of single or double width. To keep the 12-15 cm thick road-logs from sinking into the swampy soil, they were supported by thicker than 35-40 cm logs in three or more lines. On these the 12-15 cm logs of road-width length were placed crosswise, thin end following thick end. They were "nailed" down with wooden pegs. There were hand drills available for drilling the peg-holes. The pegs were whittled with ax and hammered into position. Their extra length was simply broken off. – At places, where trucks were short of tires, wooden "rails" were "nailed" to the log-road at the distance of the truck's wheelbase. – It was not an Indianapolis race track, but trucks were able to transport.

          13. At the saw mills large amounts of sawdust were produced. It had to be removed from below the machines. It was shoveled into tipper trams on narrow iron rails and pushed manually and emptied on some 300-400 meter length along the rails. When the rail-sides could not take any more dust a big dozer, 'Stalinec' came to push it further away.

          14. Laszlo worked in a brigade erecting poles for electric transmission lines. - At the thicker end of the suitably high plus 2 meters in the ground, a narrow ditch was dug to receive a 12 inch wide "strong" at least 2 meter long board. This board was vertically sunk into the ground as the ditch became deeper. On it the thicker end of the pole was sliding down as it was eased into position by an X shaped support. When in position the pole was straightened up with ropes tied to its top; the board was taken out and the ditch was filled back. - Laszlo used this technique erecting three poles, when he put electricity into his shop on his garden hill at his summer cottage.

          15. On a typical workday in the morning at six, the cabin chief elected by the cabin crew woke up the prisoners. They dressed for work at the cutting site; pants, shoes, boots, /toe-rag, foot cloth, worn jackets, coats and the cap (furaska). They had breakfast in the cabin, they filled canteens with water from the kitchen kettle. They picked up the needed tools: ax, pull-saws, used only for very thick trees, frame saws with thin blades made in Finland, hammer, the brigade leader picked up the drills from the tool storage. etc. - Most of the brigade leaders, called masters, were older convicted Russian criminals, doing prison time. - They walked to the worksite. At a rest period they ate lunch brought to the worksite. In winter they were able to make drinking water at the worksite by melting snow in the mess tin and boiling it for 5 minutes. – Trees thicker than about 10 cm were sawed at 30cm above the ground and were cut to desired lengths. The branches were cleaned off and burned in the fire, started in the morning, to avoid future forest fires. The logs were piled ready for transport on river/rivulet ice or on trucks. The brigade leader made measurements using his tables for the log size; he recorded the required 4.1 m3 daily product for a worker. After about 10 hour daily work, they walked back to the camp leaving tools at the work site. - Laszlo does not remember a day, when work was stopped because of bad weather.


          http://sinira.com/public_html/FTR-233%20PW%20Camps%20in%20Siberia.htm



          --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, Danuta Janina Wójcik <sandlily@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have listened to Pani Czeslawa, over and over again. Michael, I am not sure she is telling you the name of the place, but using a term, rather than a proper name. It definately sounds as, Nowy cywilny (new civilian) - uczestnik (participant/entrant), but she is pronouncing, it as uczastnik (short "a" sound)
          >
          > Here are a few names you can ask her about --- Nowosibirk, Kustanajski (in the Kazachstan area) - in English Kazakhstan.
          >
          > http://en.infoglobe.cz/traveller-guide/a-journey-to-siberia-nowosibirsk/
          >
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Laurence
          > To: GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Sunday, July 31, 2011 8:48 AM
          > Subject: [GaliciaPoland-Ukraine] Re: Logging camp Name in Syberia
          >
          >
          >
          > Michael,
          >
          > Spell the name and what part of Siberia?
          >
          > _______
          >
          > Lavrentiy
          >
          > --- In GaliciaPoland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Telega" <mtelegajr@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I interviewed my 2nd cousin Czeslawa Golubienko (Telega). In the interview she told me the name of the camp she was at. But could not spell it for me. I will add a sound file of the interview where she says the name of the camp where our family was deported to in siberia.
          > >
          > > I added the sound file in the files section named InterviewCehaTelega.mp3
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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