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Re: Namaka entry in Etomology

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  • einamaka
    Very informative! thank you so much... =) Cheers! Erika ... spelling, ... spelled as ... Latin maximus = ... Maximovich i
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 4, 2004
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      Very informative!
      thank you so much... =)

      Cheers!
      Erika

      --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, bbadzio@l... wrote:
      > Erika,
      >
      > I forgot to mention that Maksymovych (the current Ukrainian
      spelling,
      > transliterated) would be a patronymic of Maksym (may also be
      spelled as
      > Maxim). My little name dictionary derives this from the
      Latin "maximus" =
      > greatest.
      >
      > Bohdana
      >
      >
      > > PS... is this book still in your possesion? If so I'd like to see
      > > the entry for another name if possible... Maksemovich,
      Maximovich i
      > > think is the same name... thanks!! =)
    • Laurence Krupnak
      Hello Bohdana, ... ******** I think the following might be useful for Erika. Most baptismal names used by Rusyns/Ukrainians are modifications of Greek names,
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 4, 2004
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        Hello Bohdana,

        You wrote in part:

        > As for Hebrew meanings, you'll find that in all christian names. That's
        > where they come from, later being modified to fit better into the
        > recepient, so to speak, language. A little more on the meaning of NAUM and
        > many other given names see http:www.behindthename.com .
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Bohdana

        ********


        I think the following might be useful for Erika.

        Most baptismal names used by Rusyns/Ukrainians are modifications of
        Greek names, some of which have Hebrew origins (i.e., they are
        "biblical"
        names).

        Other baptismal names derived from the Greeks don't have Hebrew
        origins, such as Dmytro which is from the Greek name Dimitrios, who was
        the son Demeter, the Greek mythological goddess of fertility.

        Other baptismal names are purely Slavic, such as Iaroslav, etc.

        There are names of foreign origins too, such as Volodymyr (Vladimir)
        from the Nordic name Valdemar. There are not many names used by Rusyns/
        Ukrainians which are from Western European or Roman origins. Those that
        are are names of some saints of the unified church, i.e. before the
        church schism in 1054. But not pre-schism saint names are used, e.g.,
        Patrick is not used by Rusyns/Ukrainians, even though Saint Patrick is
        a very prominent pre-schism saint.

        ________

        Lavrentiy

        .
        .




        bbadzio@... wrote:


        > As for Hebrew meanings, you'll find that in all christian names. That's
        > where they come from, later being modified to fit better into the
        > recepient, so to speak, language. A little more on the meaning of NAUM and
        > many other given names see http:www.behindthename.com .
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Bohdana
      • einamaka
        Thank you! Baptismal name, meaning first names? The the first names of my family (Namaka) were for the most part all biblical... Maryia, Anastazya, Michal, and
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 4, 2004
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          Thank you!

          Baptismal name, meaning first names?

          The the first names of my family (Namaka) were for the most part all
          biblical... Maryia, Anastazya, Michal, and then Oleska (Alex) would
          be Greek i guess...? Im not sure where Brazil or Hrynko originate...
          the American children had biblical Americanized names, Mary, Peter,
          Paul, Andrew, Michael, John.

          Is there anything that differenciates Rusyn-Ukrainian names from non-
          Rusyn names? I'm still trying to figure out if my family is
          indeed "Rusyn"...

          Cheers!
          Erika



          --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, Laurence Krupnak
          <Lkrupnak@e...> wrote:
          > Hello Bohdana,
          >
          > You wrote in part:
          >
          > > As for Hebrew meanings, you'll find that in all christian
          names. That's
          > > where they come from, later being modified to fit better into the
          > > recepient, so to speak, language. A little more on the meaning
          of NAUM and
          > > many other given names see http:www.behindthename.com .
          > >
          > > Regards,
          > >
          > > Bohdana
          >
          > ********
          >
          >
          > I think the following might be useful for Erika.
          >
          > Most baptismal names used by Rusyns/Ukrainians are
          modifications of
          > Greek names, some of which have Hebrew origins (i.e., they are
          > "biblical"
          > names).
          >
          > Other baptismal names derived from the Greeks don't have Hebrew
          > origins, such as Dmytro which is from the Greek name Dimitrios,
          who was
          > the son Demeter, the Greek mythological goddess of fertility.
          >
          > Other baptismal names are purely Slavic, such as Iaroslav, etc.
          >
          > There are names of foreign origins too, such as Volodymyr
          (Vladimir)
          > from the Nordic name Valdemar. There are not many names used by
          Rusyns/
          > Ukrainians which are from Western European or Roman origins.
          Those that
          > are are names of some saints of the unified church, i.e. before
          the
          > church schism in 1054. But not pre-schism saint names are used,
          e.g.,
          > Patrick is not used by Rusyns/Ukrainians, even though Saint
          Patrick is
          > a very prominent pre-schism saint.
          >
          > ________
          >
          > Lavrentiy
          >
          > .
          > .
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > bbadzio@l... wrote:
          >
          >
          > > As for Hebrew meanings, you'll find that in all christian
          names. That's
          > > where they come from, later being modified to fit better into the
          > > recepient, so to speak, language. A little more on the meaning
          of NAUM and
          > > many other given names see http:www.behindthename.com .
          > >
          > > Regards,
          > >
          > > Bohdana
        • MHHighlanders@comcast.net
          Dear Bohdana: Thank you for working this out in the room. I am learning too! Wasyl ... From: bbadzio@look.ca To: Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com Sent:
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 5, 2004
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            Dear Bohdana:
            Thank you for working this out in the room. I am learning too!
            Wasyl
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: bbadzio@...
            To: Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 4:05 PM
            Subject: [Galicia_Poland-Ukraine] Re: Namaka entry in Etomology


            Hello Erika,

            since your message inadvertently went to the group, I'll reply to the
            group also - perhaps, someone else will find this useful.

            Surname NAMAKA did appear in the dictionary in this exact form, which
            means that Wasyl Irklievsyj found it in the Ukrainian sources he chose for
            his work. The word "HAMAKA" in the right top corner of the cell is indeed
            the Ukrainian spelling of the surname (I probably forgot to mention this
            in my earlier message regarding the posted Word document). Ukrainian "H"
            is the "N" sound.

            Actually, almost 40% of Ukrainian alphabet appears exactly like English
            letters: A, B, E, I, K, M, N, O, R, C, T, X (prepare for the test next
            time: what sounds do they denote? :)) And then, there is the backward R (
            the "ya" sound), the backward N (the "i" and in "mitts") and the
            uppside-down V ("L"). Finally, handwritten Y looks like the letter for
            "oo". Together, 16 out of the 32 Ukrainian letters, or 50%. Confusing or
            curious?

            As for Hebrew meanings, you'll find that in all christian names. That's
            where they come from, later being modified to fit better into the
            recepient, so to speak, language. A little more on the meaning of NAUM and
            many other given names see http:www.behindthename.com .


            Regards,

            Bohdana




            >
            >
            > Hello Bohdana!
            >
            > thank you so much for taking the time to do this for us!
            >
            > you had mentioned in your email that some names you put on your
            > final list might have been "next best matches". I am wondering if
            > mine was one of them?
            >
            > I noticed the spelling looked like "Hamaka" and not Namaka. Is the
            > cyrillic letter that looks similar to a Roman "H" pronounced as a
            > Roman "N"? My greatgrand-parents grave sites were carved in
            > Ukrainian cyrillic (I thought so anyway because Maria's name looks
            > like "Mapia") and the name "Namaka" looks as is... with out the "H"
            > looking letter.
            >
            > I was suprised to see it had a Hebrew meaning, which is
            > interesting...!
            >
            > Thanks so much for any help...
            > Erika...
            > PS... is this book still in your possesion? If so I'd like to see
            > the entry for another name if possible... Maksemovich, Maximovich i
            > think is the same name... thanks!! =)
            >


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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Laurence Krupnak
            Hello Erika, ... A baptismal name is the name given to a person when that person is baptized. Not all first names are baptismal names. For example, in
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 5, 2004
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              Hello Erika,

              You wrote:

              > Baptismal name, meaning first names?


              A baptismal name is the name given to a person when that person is
              baptized. Not all first names are baptismal names. For example, in
              Orthodox churches names such as William, Charles, Tyrone, Cheryl, Erika,
              etc. are not Orthodox Christian names.


              > The the first names of my family (Namaka) were for the most part all
              > biblical... Maryia, Anastazya, Michal, and then Oleska (Alex) would
              > be Greek i guess...?


              o Maria and Michael are biblical names, i.e., they
              are names present in the Bible (in the Old and/or
              New Testament).

              o Anastasia is from the Greek word anastasis, which
              means resurrection.

              o Oleska is a diminutive of Oleksander, which is the
              Ukrainian version of Alexander. Alexander is the
              from two the Greek words: <alexo>, "to defend,"
              and <aner>, "man."

              Note that there is also Oleksa which is a diminutive of
              Oleksiy, which is the Ukrainian version of the Greek name
              Alexios. Oleksa is regarded by some as a variant of
              Oleksander.


              > Im not sure where Brazil or Hrynko originate...


              What is the source of the Brazil spelling? It could be Vasyl, which
              is Ukrainian version of Basil.


              Hyrnko is a diminutive of Hryhoriy, which is Ukrainian version of
              Gregory.



              > the American children had biblical Americanized names, Mary, Peter,
              > Paul, Andrew, Michael, John.
              >
              > Is there anything that differenciates Rusyn-Ukrainian names from non-
              > Rusyn names?



              There are many cases where names differ and there are some instances
              where a name is used by Ukrainians and is not used by Rusyns and vica
              versa.



              > I'm still trying to figure out if my family is indeed "Rusyn"...


              There is a saying, "all Ukrainians are Rusyns, but not all Rusyns are
              Ukrainians."


              Join the Rusyn Mailing List at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/rusyns
              to learn thge differences between Rusyns and Ukrainians.


              > Cheers!
              > Erika


              _______

              Lavrentiy

              .
              .
            • bbadzio@look.ca
              Thank you, Lavrentiy, for this clarification. Bohdana
              Message 6 of 10 , Nov 5, 2004
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                Thank you, Lavrentiy, for this clarification.

                Bohdana


                >
                > Hello Bohdana,
                >
                > You wrote in part:
                >
                >> As for Hebrew meanings, you'll find that in all christian names. That's
                >> where they come from, later being modified to fit better into the
                >> recepient, so to speak, language. A little more on the meaning of NAUM
                >> and
                >> many other given names see http:www.behindthename.com .
                >>
                >> Regards,
                >>
                >> Bohdana
                >
                > ********
                >
                >
                > I think the following might be useful for Erika.
                >
                > Most baptismal names used by Rusyns/Ukrainians are modifications of
                > Greek names, some of which have Hebrew origins (i.e., they are
                > "biblical"
                > names).
                >
                > Other baptismal names derived from the Greeks don't have Hebrew
                > origins, such as Dmytro which is from the Greek name Dimitrios, who was
                > the son Demeter, the Greek mythological goddess of fertility.
                >
                > Other baptismal names are purely Slavic, such as Iaroslav, etc.
                >
                > There are names of foreign origins too, such as Volodymyr (Vladimir)
                > from the Nordic name Valdemar. There are not many names used by Rusyns/
                > Ukrainians which are from Western European or Roman origins. Those that
                > are are names of some saints of the unified church, i.e. before the
                > church schism in 1054. But not pre-schism saint names are used, e.g.,
                > Patrick is not used by Rusyns/Ukrainians, even though Saint Patrick is
                > a very prominent pre-schism saint.
                >
                > ________
                >
                > Lavrentiy
                >
                > .
                > .
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > bbadzio@... wrote:
                >
                >
                >> As for Hebrew meanings, you'll find that in all christian names. That's
                >> where they come from, later being modified to fit better into the
                >> recepient, so to speak, language. A little more on the meaning of NAUM
                >> and
                >> many other given names see http:www.behindthename.com .
                >>
                >> Regards,
                >>
                >> Bohdana
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
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